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Who is healthy and STILL has an advanced directive???

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someone mentioned advanced directives in another thread and it got me to thinking. dh and i were discussing advanced directives today. we are in our 50's very healthy and active. i'm an apn and he's a high school teacher. neither of us have an advanced directive. i know for myself at this point in my life if i had something acute happen, ie cardiac arrest, mva, i would want everything done at the outset but maybe down the road if things weren't looking good, especially if i wouldn't be cognitively intact, i would not want to live like that. dh isn't sure what he wants - he just knows he doesn't want to be old and useless. we both value quality of life over quantity.

 

so...my question is: who has advanced directives for themselves/spouses and what do they say? who keeps them? how does the hospital know you have them?

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I have the short form of an advanced directive---in Oregon it's called a POLST form, or Physician's Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment---which clearly spells out my wishes in case of a catastrophic medical event. My PCP was reluctant to sign it because he thought I was "too young to be a DNR", but as I told him, he and I both know what happens in a code and I didn't want any part of that---if I'm down and there are no signs of life, LEAVE ME ALONE!!

I'm OK with treatment if I have a shockable rhythm and there is a chance I could recover from whatever felled me, but if not, fuhgeddaboutit. Yes, give me antibiotics if I'm septic, put me on a vent if I've got pneumonia and an SaO2 of 70%, operate if someone shoots me in the back and I've got even half a chance of survival......but don't anyone DARE try to keep me alive past my expiration date. I've lived a good life, and from here on out it's all about the quality, not the quantity, of the time left to me.

My hubby has yet to complete one of these forms; even though I know what he would prefer, I worry sometimes because there's no way to make sure his wishes are followed. I've seen too many instances of this in the case of nursing-home residents, many of whom would be just as content to fade away and be with their loved ones who have gone on before them, but whose families just can't seem to "let go and let God", so to speak. No WAY do I want to be like that, suspended between life as I've lived it and death, unable to speak for myself or take care of my own needs. :(

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Agree with you there!

At this stage of the game, I don't want to be a DNR but I do want someone looking out for my best interests...

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Funny you should ask as, I'm going to get "all my papers" together next week before I leave for India.

I'm very healthy as well. Obviously if I were to suddenly drop and someone did CPR that would not be "futile care", but what happens after that is what I want control over. If I come back in a vegetative state brain dead, no tubes and lots of morphine please, or if I get a terminal illness, I'll accept that terminal means terminal and refuse futile treatment.

I recently picked a funeral home and a cheap plan for my cremation through a program in my church, and need to let my family know. Also, I want to specify what happens to my house (which will go to my ex and not my family) and my meager savings.

When did I get so old and responsible.

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We are both heatlhy and have had Advanced Directives for at least 20 years.

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I am nearly certain that the POLST document Viva refers to was part of the many papers the DW and I signed when we hired a lawyer to make out a will and get "our affairs in order". But the next time I see our lawyer at church I'm going to ask him.

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My husband has an advanced directive; he had gotten forms to fill out from the National Guard and, in case something happens to him, I have POA and the right to refuse futile treatment. (Keep telling him he'd better be nice to me! LOL!)

As of yet I do not have one done. I will get it done before I go in for surgery. DH wants me to be very specific regarding what I want done and not done. Right now, I am fairly healthy and only fifty so I would want heroic measures taken if there was a reasonable chance of recovery. And that means, yes, I do want CPR if I code on the table. However, in the case of brain death, all bets are off. I don't want anything done other than to keep my organs going until they can be harvested for transplant if I am brain dead.

My husband is aware of my wishes and knows that I do not want to end up in a persistent vegetative state or have futile care that will not increase the quality of life when I am old and frail, especially if I have dementia.

I will definitely take care of this prior to my procedure.

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This is a repeat, but we have to ask all our moms, even the teenagers, if they have an AD, and if not, would they like to have some information about them. Most of them, and many others also, don't know what they are, so we have to explain it...an admission task that just adds to our work load.

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Don't claim to be "extra healthy" but I've had an advanced directive for I guess 20 years maybe a bit longer.

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I am proud of myself. Today I completed an advanced directive, two copies, one to be kept in our safe deposit box and the other that I will take with me to the hospital when I have surgery on Monday. I have made it very clear that, while I am healthy, yes, do whatever is necessary to prolong the quality and quantity of life but should I suffer brain death, keep me alive only long enough to procure organs for transplant. I also stated that I do not want to ever end up in a persistent vegetative state and that should I suffer dementia at some point, I only want comfort cares, no lifesaving efforts.

I have seen too many people suffer needlessly when their bodies and minds have been ravaged by Alzheimer's and other dementia-causing illnesses. My own aunt died from Alzheimer's earlier this year and it got to the point, when I worked LTC, that I saw her face in so many of the residents for whom I cared at work.

Felt kinda weird when I got the documents notarized but it feels good to have gotten this done.

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moogie, i know it is still early but wanted to wish you well for your surgery on monday.

if i didn't do it now, goodness knows when i'd remember again.

everything is going to go smoothly and your giblets will be gone, Gone, GONE!!!:yeah:

how long will you be hospitalized?

hugs and a gentle noogie, my friend.:redpinkhe

leslie

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Everything that Leslie said; only a little harder noogie. :D

(Er, a "noogie" is where you rub your knuckles on a person's head, right? I'd hate to get "noogie" mixed up with "wedgie". :lol2: )

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