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Where are the healthcare professionals?

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18 hours ago, MoondoggieRN said:

Michael Bennett agrees:

"Donald Trump, you can see it in his face. He thinks the game is coming to him. You can see it in his face every day,” Bennet said in regards to Democrats eliminating private insurance and forcing everyone into government-run healthcare. “If we nominate someone that is for that plan, we will not win the presidency, and we will have no hope of winning a majority in the Senate.”

“If we’re going to go into this election talking about taking away [employer-based] health insurance for 180 million people, I guarantee we will be on defense,” Bennet added."

Considering overall support for medicare-for-all / single payer ranges between just over 50% and 70%, it would seem unlikely that pushing a single player plan would be detrimental to any candidate, democrat or republican, which might be why Donald Trump ran on a universal coverage platform.

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16 hours ago, MunoRN said:

Considering overall support for medicare-for-all / single payer ranges between just over 50% and 70%, it would seem unlikely that pushing a single player plan would be detrimental to any candidate, democrat or republican, which might be why Donald Trump ran on a universal coverage platform.

Which he has yet to deliver on.  Imagine if he and the Republicans actually did this when they had the majority how different things would be in this campaign.

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17 hours ago, MunoRN said:

Considering overall support for medicare-for-all / single payer ranges between just over 50% and 70%, it would seem unlikely that pushing a single player plan would be detrimental to any candidate, democrat or republican, which might be why Donald Trump ran on a universal coverage platform.

Yes, the ambiguous medicare for all/ single payer polls quite high.

Doing away private insurance and forcing everyone on medicare will not be nearly as popular.

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13 hours ago, MoondoggieRN said:

Yes, the ambiguous medicare for all/ single payer polls quite high.

Doing away private insurance and forcing everyone on medicare will not be nearly as popular.

Specific medicare-for-all also polls quite high.  https://thehill.com/hilltv/what-americas-thinking/412545-70-percent-of-americans-support-medicare-for-all-health-care

Private insurance doesn't go away with Medicare.   Medicare plans make up the largest portion of plans for a few different insurance providers. 

What do you see as preferable about private insurance plans vs Medicare?

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1 hour ago, MunoRN said:

Private insurance doesn't go away with Medicare.

Under Warren's plan, it does.  

1 hour ago, MunoRN said:

42% strongly supported it a year ago.   Not too impressive.  And it's likely many of those polled, like yourself now, didnt understand it means getting rid of private insurance completely. 

 

1 hour ago, MunoRN said:

What do you see as preferable about private insurance plans vs Medicare?

 

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11 hours ago, MunoRN said:

Specific medicare-for-all also polls quite high.  https://thehill.com/hilltv/what-americas-thinking/412545-70-percent-of-americans-support-medicare-for-all-health-care

Private insurance doesn't go away with Medicare.   Medicare plans make up the largest portion of plans for a few different insurance providers. 

What do you see as preferable about private insurance plans vs Medicare?

You can go bankrupt by using private insurance for an expensive health need.  The private insurer may well try to deny your expensive care before they pay for it, using your precious time and resources to argue with them.  Private insurers may have limited provider catalogs with few choices in some regions.  Those are all preferable, right?

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33 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

You can go bankrupt by using private insurance for an expensive health need.  The private insurer may well try to deny your expensive care before they pay for it, using your precious time and resources to argue with them.  Private insurers may have limited provider catalogs with few choices in some regions.  Those are all preferable, right?

You can go dead waiting for services because many providers wont be able to stay in business relying only on medicare rates to survive.

Letting insurers operate in any region would be a easy fix to limited choices.

 

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Cost of Employer-Provided Health Coverage Passes $20,000 a Year

Annual premiums rose 5% to hit $20,576 for an employer-provided family plan in 2019, according to the yearly poll of employers by the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation. On average, employers bore 71% of that cost, while employees paid the rest...

...   Employees’ costs rose at an even faster clip—the average annual amount workers paid toward premiums for the family plans grew 8%, to $6,015 this year...

...  For an individual employer plan, the average total premium cost was $7,188 in the 2019 survey, or 4% higher than last year...

...    The rate of growth in coverage costs, including those borne by employees, continued to outstrip rises in inflation and wages, according to the Kaiser foundation, squeezing workers despite a low unemployment rate that might encourage companies to sweeten their benefits.

“For some workers, employer-based coverage isn’t such a great deal,” because of the high costs they have to bear, said Gary Claxton, a senior vice president of the Kaiser foundation.

The survey also showed that firms with a large share of lower-wage workers tended to require them to pay a larger amount toward their premiums on average, and many of their employees remained uncovered.

“Health-care affordability is generally the No. 1 issue for voters,” said Dan Mendelson, a founder of a health-care consulting firm and former federal official who is now an operating partner at a private-equity firm. “The issue is the costs that consumers actually see, including deductibles, copays and the cost of prescription drugs.”...

https://www.wsj.com/articles/cost-of-employer-provided-health-coverage-passes-20-000-a-year-11569429000?mod=mktw&link_id=6&can_id=4ede6423e423726bdee78262ebd4207b&source=email-let-me-tell-you-whats-happening-in-washington&email_referrer=email_656351&email_subject=let-me-tell-you-whats-happening-in-washington 

 

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On 11/2/2019 at 3:49 PM, MunoRN said:

There are insurance company employees with an RN who don't work as nurses, that's according to nursing boards not just my opinion.  Reviewing the claims for the purpose of denying coverage is not acting as a "Caregiver".  Medicare and it's contracted private companies however also employs nurses, but as nurses, they oversee the care of patients with chronic conditions to help avoid hospitalizations.  I don't see any problem with transitioning nurses from interfering with care to supporting care but replacing for-profit insurance with medicare.  

Yes, this your opinion. Nurse work for insurance company facts as telenurses. There are a multitude of fields of nurse work. 

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Health Insurance Whistleblower Reveals How Industry Will Attack Warren’s New Plan

Now that we’ve seen Senator Elizabeth Warren’s plan to pay for Medicare for All without raising taxes on the middle class, let me tell you what is happening in Washington. 

Forbes Tate, the Washington-based PR firm hired by big insurance, drug and hospital companies to create and run a front group called the Partnership for America’s Health Care Future, will already have convened an urgent conference call with its clients to go over Warren’s plan and begin implementing a strategy to attack it. A big part of that strategy will be to reach out to reliable industry allies to do the dirty work...

...   The health insurance industry believed it was marching Warren into a trap, and now they’re scrambling to come up with a response to preserve their treasured but failing cash cow: the employer-based health insurance system...

...   The advocates of preserving the U.S. employer-based system—most notably America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) and Forbes Tate’s Partnership, of which AHIP is a member—will be forced to quickly come up with new talking points.

As the former head of corporate communications for Cigna, one of AHIP’s biggest members, and a former member of AHIP’s strategic communications committee, I can assure you that health insurers will find Warren’s plan terrifying because it will force their employer customers to question the need for, the “value proposition” of, private health insurers...

...   Even before Warren rolled out her plan, I had heard from employers all across the country that the current system no longer works for them, that it simply is no longer economically sustainable for either them or their employees.

Employers of all sizes have woken up to the reality that private insurers cannot and do not want to control ever-escalating health care costs. They are fed up with being hit year after year with double-digit premium increases and having to push their workers into high-deductible plans.

Their fury has been building for years as they have seen bigger and bigger hits to their bottom lines because of an expense they have little control over—the cost of providing coverage to their workforce. As the Kaiser Family Foundation has documented, over the past two decades, the cost of an employer-sponsored family plan has soared from $5,791 (in 1999) to $20,576 (in 2019)...

...  Plus, workers are becoming increasingly aware that employer-sponsored coverage is anything but secure. They know that if they lose their jobs, they also lose their employer-sponsored health insurance. And they are also becoming increasingly aware that, unlike Medicare, private insurers are limiting their choice of doctors and hospitals...

...   In my old job at Cigna, I worked with many organizations that agreed to carry health insurers’ water whenever the status quo was under threat. Expect groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce (to which AHIP quietly funneled $100 million ten years ago in an effort to kill what became the Affordable Care Act), the National Federation of Independent Business (which I worked with in the late ’90s to kill the Patients’ Bill of Rights), and the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), a longtime ally, to come out swinging against Warren’s plan.

It is especially notable that NAM is a member of the Partnership, and it also has a vested interest in protecting private insurers despite the challenges its members are facing with rising premiums and health care costs. NAM has recently jumped into the health insurance business with UnitedHealthcare, the nation’s biggest private health insurer. They have teamed up to sell association health plans to employers who want to offer coverage to workers that is exempt from the protections provided under the Affordable Care Act (and consequently less comprehensive and valuable)...

https://www.nationalmemo.com/health-insurance-whistleblower-reveals-how-industry-will-attack-warrens-new-plan/?cn-reloaded=1 

 

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1 hour ago, luv2 said:

Yes, this your opinion. Nurse work for insurance company facts as telenurses. There are a multitude of fields of nurse work. 

I worked in the health insurance industry as a health professional.  The largest role of the health professionals and medical directors was to provide the medical language and justification for the denial or redirection of care according to the insurance company policy or procedure.  Yep, they have telenurses too. IMV It's naive to presume that insurers are in the business of providing care rather than making money and that their professional employees are anything but tools to generate profit. 

It's crazy what people will do for money. 

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I know many Kaiser Permanente telephone advice nurses. A Telephone Advice Nurse is an experienced registered nurse who utilizes the nursing process to evaluate patient needs over the telephone.   https://www.jofdav.com/jobs/8368002-advice-nurse

Also some nurses function as case managers for an insurance company. Many truly listen to assess the needs of the patient, communicate with physicians,  and help people access the care they need. 

Although one purpose of this is to save money I think these nurses often truly help patients. 

BUT as with Kaiser, where Kaiser also owns the hospitals and clinics and is the employer of their nurses, physicians, and other workers corporation nurses must always advocate in the best interest of their patients.

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