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Where are the healthcare professionals?

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Today Friday,  November 1st, 2019, Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat Presidential candidate, a Senator, a lawyer, a former special education teacher who has never worked in healthcare, has written a new way to pay for Medicare for All?

 My questions as a Registered Nurse are:

Where are the healthcare professionals to state it makes no sense? Her plan is unrealistic, at best.

Is Senator Warren’s Medicare for All plan the new vision of the Democratic party?

How are hospitals going to pay for getting the room cleaned and sterilized, therapies, who will deliver the medication, who will distribute the medicines, who will answer the phone, who will cook the meals, and who will case manage the patient's care to name a few?

Are all healthcare professionals getting paid the same as a new graduate with no experience? 

What about documentation?

What are staffing ratios for the profession?

Healthcare is a litigious profession who will pay for malpractice insurance?

Biden finally calling her out.

 

Edited by luv2
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Please start at  00:15 when Senator Elizabeth Warren tells healthcare professionals to start to look for a new job. My response is how about I look for another candidate to be President of the United States of America?  

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I think you're reaching by referring to insurance company staff as "healthcare professionals".

We have an unnecessarily bloated health insurance industry and reducing it's size wouldn't be a bad thing, luckily we also have a healthcare industry that needs more caregivers.

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I know many more health professionals in favor of single payer health care than are opposed to it. 

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2 hours ago, luv2 said:

Today Friday,  November 1st, 2019, Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat Presidential candidate, a Senator, a lawyer, a former special education teacher who has never worked in healthcare, has written a new way to pay for Medicare for All?

 My questions as a Registered Nurse are:

Where are the healthcare professionals to state it makes no sense? Her plan is unrealistic, at best.

Is Senator Warren’s Medicare for All plan the new vision of the Democratic party?

How are hospitals going to pay for getting the room cleaned and sterilized, therapies, who will deliver the medication, who will distribute the medicines, who will answer the phone, who will cook the meals, and who will case manage the patient's care to name a few?

Are all healthcare professionals getting paid the same as a new graduate with no experience? 

What about documentation?

What are staffing ratios for the profession?

Healthcare is a litigious profession who will pay for malpractice insurance?

Biden finally calling her out.

Any bill offered by the president would have to go through a process, be voted for in both houses of congress before being signed into law.

Also Medicare For All would pay the hospitals and providers. Just as Medicare does not  run the hospitals now. CMS regulations are minimal. Here is a link:

https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/Manuals/downloads/som107ap_a_hospitals.pdf

Many states have additional regulations. Here are a couple links to nursing requirements and staffing requirements for my state:

What must be done by a registered nurse: https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Document/IFD69DB90621311E2998CBB33624929B8?viewType=FullText&originationContext=documenttoc&transitionType=CategoryPageItem&contextData=(sc.Default)

Nurse staffing regulations: https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Document/I8612C410941F11E29091E6B951DDF6CE?viewType=FullText&originationContext=documenttoc&transitionType=CategoryPageItem&contextData=(sc.Default)

 

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48 minutes ago, MunoRN said:

I think you're reaching by referring to insurance company staff as "healthcare professionals".

We have an unnecessarily bloated health insurance industry and reducing it's size wouldn't be a bad thing, luckily we also have a healthcare industry that needs more caregivers.

There are nurses who work for different healthcare insurance companies. Do the research. By the way, we are a team from nurses to doctors, NP, PA, RT, OT, PT anyone who works in healthcare is part of the caregiver team.

 

Edited by luv2
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48 minutes ago, MunoRN said:

I think you're reaching by referring to insurance company staff as "healthcare professionals".

We have an unnecessarily bloated health insurance industry and reducing it's size wouldn't be a bad thing, luckily we also have a healthcare industry that needs more caregivers.

There are plenty of actual healthcare professionals who will soon realize what a disaster Warren's plan is.

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41 minutes ago, herring_RN said:

Any bill offered by the president would have to go through a process, be voted for in both houses of congress before being signed into law.

Also Medicare For All would pay the hospitals and providers. Just as Medicare does not  run the hospitals now. CMS regulations are minimal. Here is a link:

https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Guidance/Manuals/downloads/som107ap_a_hospitals.pdf

Many states have additional regulations. Here are a couple links to nursing requirements and staffing requirements for my state:

What must be done by a registered nurse: https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Document/IFD69DB90621311E2998CBB33624929B8?viewType=FullText&originationContext=documenttoc&transitionType=CategoryPageItem&contextData=(sc.Default)

Nurse staffing regulations: https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Document/I8612C410941F11E29091E6B951DDF6CE?viewType=FullText&originationContext=documenttoc&transitionType=CategoryPageItem&contextData=(sc.Default)

 

How are hospitals going to have safe staffing ratios when there is a corporate tax? Unfortunately, more hospitals will have to close down.

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49 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

I know many more health professionals in favor of single payer health care than are opposed to it. 

It depends on where financially you are in life.

 

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27 minutes ago, MoondoggieRN said:

There are plenty of actual healthcare professionals who will soon realize what a disaster Warren's plan is.

This is the TRUTH!!! People are not realizing it will cost millions of workers their jobs. 

 

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36 minutes ago, luv2 said:

How are hospitals going to have safe staffing ratios when there is a corporate tax? Unfortunately, more hospitals will have to close down.

One physicians thoughts and opinion:

Quote

How Medicare for All Would Stop Hospitals Like Hahnemann From Closing

Taking the profit motive out of health care would ensure that hospitals could provide excellent care to all who need it.

Hahnemann has been losing money, so Joel Freedman, president of the private-equity firm that owns the hospital, has decided that there is no choice but to shutter it for good—and possibly sell off its valuable real estate...

...   Regardless, a hospital closure is not an act of nature. The fact that a hospital can close because it is unprofitable is only possible because we allow it, and in this respect, Hahnemann is far from unique. More than 100 rural hospitals across the nation have closed in recent years, leaving many poor communities bereft of access to even basic health-care services. From 2004 to 2014, some 650,000 women of childbearing age in rural counties lost all access to obstetric services, according to a 2017 study...

...   Could Medicare for All, as some have argued, save Hahnemann? The answer is yes, but the point is not merely changing who pays for health care, but how it is paid for. A well-structured single-payer system, unlike other health-care reform proposals, could indeed extract the profit motive from hospital financing. This would not only help save endangered hospitals throughout the country but also help transform them for the better.

For one thing, single payer can be used as a tool to directly push for-profit corporations out of the health-care delivery business altogether, by excluding them from participation in the public plan and buying out their facilities (in this respect, both single-payer bills in Congress can use bolstering). After all, for-profit providers have worse results—and often at higher costs. And as long as hospitals exist as businesses, they can close like businesses when their investors see better opportunities for profit elsewhere...

...   Whether hospitals are legally for-profit or nonprofit, most (to varying degrees) are profit-oriented. And to a large extent, they have to be, as a 2018 editorial in the Journal of General Internal Medicine described: Profitable hospitals expand, upgrade, beautify—attracting more patients and revenues—while unprofitable hospitals deteriorate, shed patients, lose staff, suffocate. That may be the law of market competition (which, not surprisingly, means that disadvantaged populations are often the worst-served), but that law need not govern our health-care system.

How would things be different with Medicare for All? Well, single-payer financing would allow us to separately fund hospitals’ capital costs—like new facilities or wards or major upgrades—with public funds. At the same, we can fully cover hospitals’ operating expenses through global “lump sum” budgets, as in Canada (or as proposed in the House Medicare for All bill). With such a financing model, there are no hospital profits, and so profitability ceases to be the criterion that dictates which hospitals open or close, and which expand and beautify. It would remove the incentive for hospitals to chase lucrative service lines, like spinal surgery, at the expense of unprofitable ones, like mental health. And it would ensure that we have hospitals, obstetric units, and mental health wards in the communities that need them—not just where firms think that they will be profitable...

...   In her book In Sickness and in Wealth: American Hospitals in the Twentieth Century, historian Rosemary Stevens traced how US hospitals have long contained within their walls two contradictory identities. On the one hand, they are revenue-maximizing, expansionary, businesses. On the other hand, they are community institutions embodying our “hopes and ideals”—of science, but also of solidarity. Yet the two souls of the American hospital co-exist in an unstable equilibrium. More and more, however, we are seeing the business-identity emerge triumphant.

And that is what the struggle to save Hahnemann, and Allen Psych, is all about—to transform hospitals from the businesses they increasingly are becoming into the social institutions our communities deserve, and require...

https://www.thenation.com/article/hahnemann-hospital-medicare-for-all/

 

 

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1 hour ago, herring_RN said:

One physicians thoughts and opinion:

 

 

I want make it clear healthcare is a human right regardless of someone's socioeconomic status, race, religion, or sexual orientation, and whatever factor that causes people to discriminate.  However, when people state healthcare is not a business, then please tell the state to donate electricity, water, gas, and handle medical waste, to name a few. It is a service business, but none the less a SERVICE BUSINESS. It is an uncomfortable REALITY.  

 

 

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