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What is dirtier? Do you know? Door Knob? Toilet? Pay Phone?

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Ew, Yech, Hurl....:barf01:

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/211020_putergerm07.html

Keyboards and mice that look squeaky clean also deserve a health hazard sticker. If you only knew what's lurking there, you might back off -- or run out the door screaming.

Your fingers would collect fewer germs from tapping on the typical toilet seat than they do from using the average keyboard or mouse.

Charles Gerba, a microbiologist at the University of Arizona, counted bacteria on different surfaces found in offices and homes. The study was funded by The Clorox Co., which sells household disinfectants.

Gerba found that office toilet seats had an average of 49 germs per square inch. Germ counts on computer keyboards were more than 60 times higher, averaging 3,295 bacteria per square inch. Even worse were the tops of desks (21,000) and telephones (25,000).

Makes sense, doesn't it? Toilet seats get frequent cleaning with strong disinfectants that kill germs. Keyboards and mice may never get sanitized.

People are constantly coughing and sneezing on them. Germs from unwashed fingers and hands also get deposited. Some can remain alive for several days. People who share computers share each other's germs.

It's a special risk in offices where workers share computers and in families with children notorious for paying little attention to hygiene.

Businesses may reduce illness and absenteeism by scheduling keyboards, mice, telephones and other often-touched surfaces for regular cleaning. Families may stay healthier by doing the same.

Many kinds of services, devices and products are available.

Search the Internet for terms like "sanitize keyboards mice" to see examples. They range from devices that use ultraviolet light to kill germs without touching the surface to aerosol sprays and pre-moistened towelettes.

Inexpensive alternatives are better than nothing. Unplug the computer. Mix a few drops of dishwashing detergent and water. Gently wipe the keys and mouse with a soft cloth dampened (not wet) in the solution. Repeat regularly.

Individuals can help by remembering the high germ counts. Computer users unconsciously touch their eyes, mouth and nose while working. Few people would do that after touching a toilet seat. And a keyboard is 60 times germier. Ewwww......

germs.jpg

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Wow that is something we all should think about.

(I for one haven't drank out of a water fountain after my Micro class. Another student did a bacteria testing from the actual spigot where the water comes out of. It was DISGUSTING!!!!!)

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I always suspected as much.

Maybe we need to add a "Please wash your hands after using the computer" sign, like the one in the bathroom.

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Computer keyboards in hospitals have been known to be one of the dirtiest areas in a hospital. Most do not have a cover over the keys that permit daily cleaning. Nothing new.:(

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Hand rails on stairs are filthy! They are rarely cleaned, and nearly everyone touches them going down or up stairs....can't tell you how many times I've seen people cough or sneeze, then put their hands on them...and who knows where their hands have been before that...23_3_64.gif

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Hand rails on stairs are filthy! They are rarely cleaned, and nearly everyone touches them going down or up stairs....can't tell you how many times I've seen people cough or sneeze, then put their hands on them...and who knows where their hands have been before that...23_3_64.gif

All so very true. I tell my kids and husbands all the time "Don't put your hands on the rails". We keep hand sanitizer in the cars and in my purse. What's the deal with using it too much and creating super germs? I understand super germs when it comes to the overuse of antibiotics but how does hand sanitizer create super germs?

Have you seen the new spray you can use on everything including pacifiers, food, pet dishes, etc made by clorox? I bought some. I sprayed in on Wyatt's baby swing tray and it smells very strong like Clorox. It says no need to rinse but I did.

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To be honest, I figure I've survived this far without hand sanitizers and such. Most people have. So I don't bother.

Isn't it something like less than 10% of microbes cause disease? The rest are either beneficial or neutral. So we're killing off those beneficial ones and probably barely denting the disease-causing ones.

Those germs have been around a lot long than we have anyway. I really think we aren't helping our immune systems by sanitizing every little thing we come in contact with.

Just my :twocents:

~Kat

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To be honest, I figure I've survived this far without hand sanitizers and such. Most people have. So I don't bother.

Isn't it something like less than 10% of microbes cause disease? The rest are either beneficial or neutral. So we're killing off those beneficial ones and probably barely denting the disease-causing ones.

Those germs have been around a lot long than we have anyway. I really think we aren't helping our immune systems by sanitizing every little thing we come in contact with.

Just my :twocents:

~Kat

Interesting......Thanks!

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To be honest, I figure I've survived this far without hand sanitizers and such. Most people have. So I don't bother.

Isn't it something like less than 10% of microbes cause disease? The rest are either beneficial or neutral. So we're killing off those beneficial ones and probably barely denting the disease-causing ones.

Those germs have been around a lot long than we have anyway. I really think we aren't helping our immune systems by sanitizing every little thing we come in contact with.

Just my :twocents:

~Kat

I feel the same.

Infact, one could say that with all the killing - the virulent ones find it easier to grow. Previously they had to copete for space and resources with all the other neutral bacteria... but now, maybe not?

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I feel the same.

Infact, one could say that with all the killing - the virulent ones find it easier to grow. Previously they had to copete for space and resources with all the other neutral bacteria... but now, maybe not?

That's right. With almost everything available in antibacterial, it is probably killing off the good bacteria.

Thus, giving the bad bacteria plenty of room to grow by the millions, plenty of 'food' to eat, etc.

Although after touching handrails, sneezing/coughing in your hands, I can see using an antibacterial wipe to clean your hands off.

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