Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait, or learned behavior?

  1. Hello Allnurses!

    A question I have been pondering for a very long time now is in regard to the topic of Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait (and if so, does snowflakism seem to be a dominant or recessive trait? Does one need two snowflake donor parents, or does this trait naturally become dominant?) or is snowflakism indeed a learned behavior leading one to believe environmental factors play a greater impact on developing the disabling trait of snowflakism? Thoughts?
    Last edit by 3ringnursing on Feb 24
  2. Poll: Is snowflakes a genetic trait, or a learned behavior?

    • Yes

      0% 0
    • No

      100.00% 1
    • Undecided

      0% 0
    1 Votes
  3. Visit 3ringnursing profile page

    About 3ringnursing, BSN, RN

    Joined: Sep '16; Posts: 534; Likes: 1,610

    42 Comments

  4. by   Palliative Care, DNP
    The interesting thing to consider is that both parties seem to consider the other snowflakes. Thus, would everyone not then be a snowflake? Basically, no one is special.
  5. by   amoLucia
    I thought it was caused by a mutated gene.
  6. by   TriciaJ
    The poll is not helpful; it asks an either/or question and then requires a yes/no answer. For the record, it is learned. Everyone wants their child to have a better childhood then they themselves had. Our parents were happy to give us new clothes and an occasional vacation. As we've all become more affluent how do parents improve on that? By trying to eliminate all the unfairness and discomfort from their child's life.

    A good example is to read the school nursing forum and how different things are now. There was no nurse in my school. There was no food provided. There was no playground supervision at recess. A child could ask to leave the room to use the restroom. If anyone had a headache, earache, toothache they either toughed it out, or if it was too bad the teacher simply sent the kid home. Teachers had no qualms calling out bad behaviour and parents seldom interfered with discipline provided by the school.

    I'm not saying the old way was better; there are very good reasons why things aren't done that way any longer. But the flip side is children who are unable to receive correction without feeling devastated. Bluntness is conflated with "bullying" and "hate".

    Even nursing schools try to provide a "positive experience". However, hospitals care a lot less about nurses than they ever used to. So you have a young adult whose every experience has been controlled for her safety and comfort and now she's thrown to the wolves. The wolves are her hospital environment, not her seasoned coworkers. But it is their responsibility to get her up and running and they don't have the luxury of adequate time to do everything. They don't have the time to couch everything in diplomatic, affirming language. So they are seen as the bullies. And the fresh young thing who doesn't know what hit her is labelled a snowflake.

    We need to find ways to avoid the trap of being pitted against one another. We need a united front now more than ever.
  7. by   3ringnursing
    Not actively including children in this discussion. I work with adults. I have no data about children, and cannot add any pertinent information about those under 18 years of age. Although those who wish to may. My focus is adult behaviors, although I am leaving the forum broad for any thoughts on this matter as it has been recurring for me in my line of work recently.
    Last edit by 3ringnursing on Feb 24
  8. by   BCgradnurse
    So what behaviors, traits, or characteristics are necessary to be diagnosed as a snowflake? Is it necessary to demonstrate only one trait, or is a constellation of symptoms/characteristics required?
  9. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from 3ringnursing
    Not actively including children in this discussion. I work with adults. I have no data about children, and cannot add any pertinent information about those under 18 years of age. Although those who wish to may. My focus is adult behaviors, although I am leaving the forum broad for any thoughts on this matter as it has been recurring for me in my line of work recently.
    If you're asking whether a condition is innate or acquired then childhood experiences become pertinent to the discussion.
  10. by   itsybitsy
    What is your definition of "snowflakism"? It's not a word according to the dictionary, so it's doesn't have a clear definition.

    The term "snowflake", can be used to define a person, as a slang term. According to Wikipedia:
    Someone who believes they are as unique and special as a snowflake; someone hypersensitive to insult or offense, especially a young person with politically correct sensibilities.
    snowflake - Wiktionary

    So someone easy offended? Needs political correctness to censor offensive speech or behaviors?

    If that's what you are referring to, I think it can be formed from nature and nurture. Nature because, as some studies have shown, in homosexuality, there are certain differences biologically in some who are gay, that make them feel a certain way towards the two genders. I'm sure with more research you could pinpoint certain "genes" to portray people to feel a certain way.
    Cross-Cultural Evidence for the Genetics of Homosexuality - Scientific American

    Furthermore, in regards to nature, I think if you look a certain way, attributed to your DNA, such as race or prominent facial features, those biological differences may shape the way you see yourself and then how to act, from nurture aspects.

    There are millions of different scenarios in why someone thinks the way they do, from a nurture standpoint, so that point is pretty obvious, in that of course a person's experiences form the way they think. ESPECIALLY in regards to thinking they are special and reasons they are offended.

    Everyone gets offended at some point in their life, the important part is how they deal with it.
  11. by   GrumpyRN
    So someone easy offended? Needs political correctness to censor offensive speech or behaviors?

    Everyone gets offended at some point in their life, the important part is how they deal with it.
    I like Stephen Fry's answer to offence. (Warning, 1 bit of bad language at the end)

    Stephen Fry on _being_offended.mov - YouTube
  12. by   GrumpyRN
    Ha, ha. I have posted a bit about offence and I have been moderated to ensure my post does not cause offence.

    Love the irony.


    PS moderators, I am NOT complaining, I completely understand why you moderated my post but I could not resist commenting on the irony.
  13. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    So what behaviors, traits, or characteristics are necessary to be diagnosed as a snowflake? Is it necessary to demonstrate only one trait, or is a constellation of symptoms/characteristics required?
    I have a few examples. I am truly not trying to be snarky to patients in general (I've been one enough times myself) but there seems to be a certain subset of patient's I am frequently encountering lately and I would genuinely like thoughts - even if you personally believe I am unkind, for which I am sorry.


    Patient X calls telephone triage at 4 pm on a Saturday because he ran out of his Percocet Rx 6 days early despite having a pain contract agreement promising to use the Rx as ordered, and only call for Rx refills during business hours (this is not the the first time doing so). Patient is argumentive and wants his PCP to call in a Rx now. Patient calls every month on weekends outside of clinic hours to demand a bridge Rx. Patient calls several times throughout the day to argue despite being told the is nothing that can be done until the provider is back in the office. Finally the triage nurse contacts the PCP who is not on call - provider agrees to give patient enough Rx medication to get through the weekend, however patient must agree to come in for an appointment with PCP on Monday to discuss the frequent requests for refills of his narcotic pain medication too soon. Patient gets Rx's free at our clinic pharmacies, but as our pharmacies are all closed on weekends the patient has to have Rx called into an unaffiliated chain pharmacy instead and pay out of pocket. Patient becomes angry, states he does not have the money to pay for Rx. Patient calls back 5 additional times to yell at triage nurse and complain it is not fair.

    Patient Y wants to seen right away by PCP therefore arrives at clinic as a walk-in without an appointment. All the providers are already overbooked and cannot squeeze another patient in to their schedule as a walk-in. Patient becomes angry and starts yelling at the check in desk, and is not happy with proffered compromise to either accept an appointment the following day, or go to urgent care instead, because patient says their copay at urgent care is too high. Patient calls telephone triage 4-5 times angry because the triage nurse cannot schedule an appointment for her that day either, and she will not agree to try home care advice. Patient threatens to get a lawyer and sue everyone - including the triage nurse attempting to help her.

    Patient Z had an appointment earlier that day but was a no-show. Patient elects to go to the ER later that night instead for symptoms of productive cough with green sputum. Patient calls telephone triage nurse from the ER waiting room because she is angry for being made to wait 3 hours, and wants to speak to someone in charge: because it is 1030 pm there is no one in charge available, just the one lone telephone triage nurse on duty. Telephone triage nurse attempts to explain that we have no control over the wait time in other medical facilities. Patient becomes enraged, and begins to yell they don't want to wait for 12 hours to be seen. The triage nurse attempts to calm the patient by offering her another clinic appointment in the morning instead with home care for the interim, but patient refuses. Patient calls back telephone triage nurse roughly every 30 minutes to complain about the ER wait time until the shift finally ends for the triage nurse.
  14. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from TriciaJ
    If you're asking whether a condition is innate or acquired then childhood experiences become pertinent to the discussion.
    Sure, we can add that too. All personal experiences are welcome in this discussion.

    I'm not really asking anything specific, so any interpretations are also welcome.
  15. by   itsybitsy
    Quote from GrumpyRN
    I like Stephen Fry's answer to offence. (Warning, 1 bit of bad language at the end)

    Stephen Fry on _being_offended.mov - YouTube
    Me too.

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