Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait, or learned behavior? - page 2

Hello Allnurses! A question I have been pondering for a very long time now is in regard to the topic of Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait (and if so, does snowflakism seem to be a dominant or... Read More

  1. by   BCgradnurse
    Quote from 3ringnursing
    I have a few examples. I am truly not trying to be snarky to patients in general (I've been one enough times myself) but there seems to be a certain subset of patient's I am frequently encountering lately and I would genuinely like thoughts - even if you personally believe I am unkind, for which I am sorry.


    Patient X calls telephone triage at 4 pm on a Saturday because he ran out of his Percocet Rx 6 days early despite having a pain contract agreement promising to use the Rx as ordered, and only call for Rx refills during business hours (this is not the the first time doing so). Patient is argumentive and wants his PCP to call in a Rx now. Patient calls every month on weekends outside of clinic hours to demand a bridge Rx. Patient calls several times throughout the day to argue despite being told the is nothing that can be done until the provider is back in the office. Finally the triage nurse contacts the PCP who is not on call - provider agrees to give patient enough Rx medication to get through the weekend, however patient must agree to come in for an appointment with PCP on Monday to discuss the frequent requests for refills of his narcotic pain medication too soon. Patient gets Rx's free at our clinic pharmacies, but as our pharmacies are all closed on weekends the patient has to have Rx called into an unaffiliated chain pharmacy instead and pay out of pocket. Patient becomes angry, states he does not have the money to pay for Rx. Patient calls back 5 additional times to yell at triage nurse and complain it is not fair.

    Patient Y wants to seen right away by PCP therefore arrives at clinic as a walk-in without an appointment. All the providers are already overbooked and cannot squeeze another patient in to their schedule as a walk-in. Patient becomes angry and starts yelling at the check in desk, and is not happy with proffered compromise to either accept an appointment the following day, or go to urgent care instead, because patient says their copay at urgent care is too high. Patient calls telephone triage 4-5 times angry because the triage nurse cannot schedule an appointment for her that day either, and she will not agree to try home care advice. Patient threatens to get a lawyer and sue everyone - including the triage nurse attempting to help her.

    Patient Z had an appointment earlier that day but was a no-show. Patient elects to go to the ER later that night instead for symptoms of productive cough with green sputum. Patient calls telephone triage nurse from the ER waiting room because she is angry for being made to wait 3 hours, and wants to speak to someone in charge: because it is 1030 pm there is no one in charge available, just the one lone telephone triage nurse on duty. Telephone triage nurse attempts to explain that we have no control over the wait time in other medical facilities. Patient becomes enraged, and begins to yell they don't want to wait for 12 hours to be seen. The triage nurse attempts to calm the patient by offering her another clinic appointment in the morning instead with home care for the interim, but patient refuses. Patient calls back telephone triage nurse roughly every 30 minutes to complain about the ER wait time until the shift finally ends for the triage nurse.
    Curious....why did you post this in the Political threads?
  2. by   3ringnursing
    Quote from itsybitsy
    What is your definition of "snowflakism"? It's not a word according to the dictionary, so it's doesn't have a clear definition.

    The term "snowflake", can be used to define a person, as a slang term. According to Wikipedia:

    snowflake - Wiktionary

    So someone easy offended? Needs political correctness to censor offensive speech or behaviors?

    If that's what you are referring to, I think it can be formed from nature and nurture. Nature because, as some studies have shown, in homosexuality, there are certain differences biologically in some who are gay, that make them feel a certain way towards the two genders. I'm sure with more research you could pinpoint certain "genes" to portray people to feel a certain way.
    Cross-Cultural Evidence for the Genetics of Homosexuality - Scientific American

    Furthermore, in regards to nature, I think if you look a certain way, attributed to your DNA, such as race or prominent facial features, those biological differences may shape the way you see yourself and then how to act, from nurture aspects.

    There are millions of different scenarios in why someone thinks the way they do, from a nurture standpoint, so that point is pretty obvious, in that of course a person's experiences form the way they think. ESPECIALLY in regards to thinking they are special and reasons they are offended.

    Everyone gets offended at some point in their life, the important part is how they deal with it.


    I like that line of reasoning. I guess inappropriate, and/or some forms of entitlement behavior stem from as many different factors amongst people (i.e., patient's) as there are different patterns of snowflakes - each one unique and individual based upon the person in question. So given this line of thought, it can become entangled in both genetic and learns responses? Nature plus nurture? Your thoughts make perfect sense if I am interpreting them correctly.

    The patients I am thinking about specifically are patient's who don't also have concurrent behavioral health issues.

    I'm genuinely curious about this type of mindset, as to how this comes to be (if it's not a behavior carried over from childhood). How do some patient's arrive at the crossroads of this type of thinking?

    I personally have encountered a small percentage of patient's that truly feel all their wants should be granted right now with special disposition, despite the fact that they themselves may have played a part in creating the bad scenario they are currently suffering.

    Kind of like, "The rules are fine, but they apply to everyone else, just not me" mentality.

    Many of these same patient's also do not seem to give a fig about the fact that their demands or behavior geared toward having their wants granted on the instant may possibly have an impact on how addressing the needs of the next patient may also be effected, due to being a high user of medical resources without emergent need.

    It's possible these patients may all be very nice people in their everyday lives, I don't know - but yelling, threatening, or demanding while asking for something sure seems to leave a bad taste in my mouth so to speak while interacting with them. I do try to cut them some slack while trying my best to remain cool and unruffled, but privately here? I admit I feel frustrated and irritated at times on the inside (like geez, didn't your parents ever teach you manners?). Please and thank you sure goes a long way in my opinion, and it's free. Sometimes I just want to say, "I'm not a genie in a bottle".
  3. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    Curious....why did you post this in the Political threads?
    Or what any of it has to do with snowflakes.

    As far as I can tell reading the little stories of patients X, Y and Z all that is showing is that their bad behaviour is being encouraged by their provider (I may be using provider wrongly, I am in UK and don't fully understand US system).
    If patients are shouting at staff police should be called and they should be removed and/or arrested. If patients are phoning and shouting then the phone gets hung up.

    Doing anything else is just reinforcing them to continue.
  4. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from 3ringnursing
    I'm genuinely curious about this type of mindset, as to how this comes to be (if it's not a behavior carried over from childhood). How do some patient's arrive at the crossroads of this type of thinking?

    I personally have encountered a small percentage of patient's that truly feel all their wants should be granted right now with special disposition, despite the fact that they themselves may have played a part in creating the bad scenario they are currently suffering.

    Kind of like, "The rules are fine, but they apply to everyone else, just not me" mentality.

    Many of these same patient's also do not seem to give a fig about the fact that their demands or behavior geared toward having their wants granted on the instant may possibly have an impact on how addressing the needs of the next patient may also be effected, due to being a high user of medical resources without emergent need.

    It's possible these patients may all be very nice people in their everyday lives, I don't know - but yelling, threatening, or demanding while asking for something sure seems to leave a bad taste in my mouth so to speak while interacting with them. I do try to cut them some slack while trying my best to remain cool and unruffled, but privately here? I admit I feel frustrated and irritated at times on the inside (like geez, didn't your parents ever teach you manners?). Please and thank you sure goes a long way in my opinion, and it's free. Sometimes I just want to say, "I'm not a genie in a bottle".
    As per my previous post; you are encouraging this behaviour!

    Walk away and tell them that they get nothing until they are polite and reasonable.

    They have learned that if you shout and scream then you get what you want - every drug addict knows this. That is why they are aggressive from the start.

    Edited to add; and by the way, they are not "very nice people" in their everyday lives. They have no reason to be.
  5. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Some folks have no common sense. It doesn't even occur to them to think, let alone think outside their own little boxed-in brains. "The Rules" are completely disregarded, as is civility.
    Sometimes they are yelling because they know they are wrong, but "the squeaky wheel gets the grease".
    The world is full of morons.
    I don't know if calling them "morons" is politically incorrect, but really, what can be said about those who keep doing what they are doing, and yet expect different results? Even dogs will try to wear you down unless they are taught to behave, but some folks are unteachable.

    "I want what I want when I want it, and therefore I should get it."
    ...and they won't accept that it isn't going to happen that way.

    Working with "The Public" is a thankless job a lot of times. That's why I don't do it.
  6. by   Have Nurse
    Agreed.
  7. by   joshsc
    What an unprofessional post.
  8. by   heron
    Quote from joshsc
    What an unprofessional post.
    So what? It's the breakroom, after all.
  9. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Quote from heron
    So what? It's the breakroom, after all.
    Notice the avatar, heron?
  10. by   heron
    Quote from No Stars In My Eyes
    Notice the avatar, heron?
    I do now, but I must be extra dense this morning. What am I missing?
  11. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from joshsc
    What an unprofessional post.
    Whose post was unprofessional? Be specific. Randomly calling people unprofessional is unprofessional.


    Quote from No Stars In My Eyes
    Notice the avatar, heron?
    Hi Stars, what is it about the avatar?
  12. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Military posture = regimented/unyielding

    Angel's wings = self-acclaimed divinity

    Eyes = averted over the viewer's right shoulder

    Arms crossed = with-holding/resistant


    (this is just flippant pop-culture analysis; don't know the guy at all, but I got a general sense of Humor Deficit and a judgmental huffiness.)
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from BCgradnurse
    Curious....why did you post this in the Political threads?
    More than likely it was moved from the Yellow Side by moderators. "Snowflake" has political connotations. Conservatives in particular like to spit it out when liberals complain about things like inequality, the high cost of higher education, etc.

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