Jump to content
Tweety Tweety (Member) Expert Nurse

The President Donald Trump Thread

Politics   (11,793,818 Views 8,942 Comments)
6 Followers; 53,057 Visitors; 29,241 Posts
If you find this topic helpful leave a comment.

You are reading page 735 of The President Donald Trump Thread. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

30 minutes ago, Lil Nel said:

Where do out of staters stay?

The infection rate in TN is far higher than KY, due to TN's governor not taking stringent action at the beginning of this crisis.

I respectfully disagree with you.

Without proper testing available, and no proven treatments or vaccine, we had better keep working on containment.

It is one of the few tools available in the tool box.

Beshear also wanted to use lodges at least two state parks to house fire fighters and police who needed to be quarantined. 

But I don't know if that plan has been put into action.

 

Tennessee has about the same number of total deaths, and less deaths per capita then Kentucky.

Edited by Lucylu71

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Lil Nel said:

Where do out of staters stay?

Tents. 

I don't think people are saying they should be allowed to stay in hotels or park lodges.

32 minutes ago, Lil Nel said:

The infection rate in TN is far higher than KY, due to TN's governor not taking stringent action at the beginning of this crisis.

I respectfully disagree with you.

Without proper testing available, and no proven treatments or vaccine, we had better keep working on containment.

It is one of the few tools available in the tool box.

Beshear also wanted to use lodges at least two state parks to house fire fighters and police who needed to be quarantined. 

But I don't know if that plan has been put into action.

 

There are two counties in Kentucky with infection rates far higher than any county in Tennessee, so why then should people from Butler or Jackson county in KY (481 and 322 cases per 100k) be allowed to go to McCreary county KY yet people from adjoining Scott county TN not be allowed to even though the infection rate in Scott county is slightly lower than in McCreary county?  

At what scale of geographic area does that stop?  Infection rates in more densely populated urban areas are higher than in outlying areas, should people in inner city areas be required to do all their food shopping at the convenience store on their block rather than going to an actual grocery store?  That's a slipper slope that pretty quickly gets dicey.

Just as a general rule, social distancing requires actual geographic space, limiting a fixed amount of people to a smaller geographic space isn't a defensible position based on the science, it seems to be more statism than science.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MunoRN said:

Tents. 

I don't think people are saying they should be allowed to stay in hotels or park lodges.

There are two counties in Kentucky with infection rates far higher than any county in Tennessee, so why then should people from Butler or Jackson county in KY (481 and 322 cases per 100k) be allowed to go to McCreary county KY yet people from adjoining Scott county TN not be allowed to even though the infection rate in Scott county is slightly lower than in McCreary county?  

At what scale of geographic area does that stop?  Infection rates in more densely populated urban areas are higher than in outlying areas, should people in inner city areas be required to do all their food shopping at the convenience store on their block rather than going to an actual grocery store?  That's a slipper slope that pretty quickly gets dicey.

Just as a general rule, social distancing requires actual geographic space, limiting a fixed amount of people to a smaller geographic space isn't a defensible position based on the science, it seems to be more statism than science.  

I think the intentions are good.  Slowing movement of people from any one area to another area is part of containment and mitigation during a pandemic.  Movement of people from point A to point B may be relatively safe but it definitely increases the possibilities for transmission. The more people who recreate at home and limit travel the less likely unexpected contact and contamination can occur. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Lucylu71 said:

Tennessee has about the same number of total deaths, and less deaths per capita then Kentucky.

Really?

Please show all of us the numbers you used to determine this and your source.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, MunoRN said:

Tents. 

I don't think people are saying they should be allowed to stay in hotels or park lodges.

There are two counties in Kentucky with infection rates far higher than any county in Tennessee, so why then should people from Butler or Jackson county in KY (481 and 322 cases per 100k) be allowed to go to McCreary county KY yet people from adjoining Scott county TN not be allowed to even though the infection rate in Scott county is slightly lower than in McCreary county?  

At what scale of geographic area does that stop?  Infection rates in more densely populated urban areas are higher than in outlying areas, should people in inner city areas be required to do all their food shopping at the convenience store on their block rather than going to an actual grocery store?  That's a slipper slope that pretty quickly gets dicey.

Just as a general rule, social distancing requires actual geographic space, limiting a fixed amount of people to a smaller geographic space isn't a defensible position based on the science, it seems to be more statism than science.  

The county in KY that you referenced is in southern KY, along the TN border.

A number of counties in KY that border TN have been hit very hard by the virus.

And that is because, as I have previously posted, TN didn't in act strict social distancing policies as quickly as KY.

So people traveled to TN to eat out, and go to church, as I posted one of my foolish former coworkers did.

People who engaged in that kind of irresponsible behavior, then brought the virus back to KY with them, and infected others.

Kind of like FL spring breakers.

Many of these counties don't have large populations, so it is very sad to see them so deeply impacted.

Especially the nursing homes in those areas, that have been truly hit hard.

That's why our governor says: Healthy At Home!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Lil Nel said:
15 hours ago, Lucylu71 said:

Tennessee has about the same number of total deaths, and less deaths per capita then Kentucky.

Really?

Please show all of us the numbers you used to determine this and your source.

KY: Population, 4,499,696; confirmed cases, 2,960; fatalities, 146; cases per 100,000, 65.8; fatalities per 100,000, 3.2.  

TN: Population, 6,897,576; confirmed cases, 7,070; fatalities, 148; cases per 100,000, 102.5; fatalities per 100,000, 2.1.

Population data retrieved from World Population Review's  US States site.  COVID case and fatality data retrieved from Johns Hopkins University’s COVID-19 United States Cases by County map. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Lucylu71 said:

Tennessee has about the same number of total deaths, and less deaths per capita then Kentucky.

It doesn't look to me like Chare proved your point, dude.

And what is your point?

That stricter guidelines lead to fewer deaths?

That not enacting strict social distancing guidelines leads to more deaths?

Is there even a point?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chare said:

KY: Population, 4,499,696; confirmed cases, 2,960; fatalities, 146; cases per 100,000, 65.8; fatalities per 100,000, 3.2.  

TN: Population, 6,897,576; confirmed cases, 7,070; fatalities, 148; cases per 100,000, 102.5; fatalities per 100,000, 2.1.

Population data retrieved from World Population Review's  US States site.  COVID case and fatality data retrieved from Johns Hopkins University’s COVID-19 United States Cases by County map. 

Thanks Chare for showing the numbers that prove KY has fewer coronavirus cases than TN.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From today's NY Post:

KY Sees Its Highest Spike In Coronavirus Cases After Lockdown Protests

Of course these protests didn't directly impact the spike, which was reflected in numbers announced by Governor yesterday, but perhaps in 14-20 days.

Look at the photos the accompany the story.

These people are zombies.

And you would have to be, to participate in a mass gathering like that while virus cases are still climbing.

Zombies would be immune, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, toomuchbaloney said:

I think the intentions are good.  Slowing movement of people from any one area to another area is part of containment and mitigation during a pandemic.  Movement of people from point A to point B may be relatively safe but it definitely increases the possibilities for transmission. The more people who recreate at home and limit travel the less likely unexpected contact and contamination can occur. 

Travelling itself doesn't actually increase the possibilities for transmission, it's the person-to-person interaction and proximity characteristics that determine that risk.  In some cases, such as air travel, it certainly increases those risks, people driving to and from a trailhead where doing so decreases the person-to-person interaction and proximity that would have occurred if they had added to the density of people using their neighborhood trails and sidewalks doesn't increase the risk and if anything it decreases the overall risks of transmission.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Lil Nel said:

The county in KY that you referenced is in southern KY, along the TN border.

A number of counties in KY that border TN have been hit very hard by the virus.

And that is because, as I have previously posted, TN didn't in act strict social distancing policies as quickly as KY.

So people traveled to TN to eat out, and go to church, as I posted one of my foolish former coworkers did.

People who engaged in that kind of irresponsible behavior, then brought the virus back to KY with them, and infected others.

Kind of like FL spring breakers.

Many of these counties don't have large populations, so it is very sad to see them so deeply impacted.

Especially the nursing homes in those areas, that have been truly hit hard.

That's why our governor says: Healthy At Home!

The infection rate both those border counties I mentioned was about 50 per 100k, significantly lower than 'hard hit' counties.  

Again, I'm not really sure how someone hiking with far fewer people per area than they would if they didn't go there increases the transmission risk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MunoRN said:

Travelling itself doesn't actually increase the possibilities for transmission, it's the person-to-person interaction and proximity characteristics that determine that risk.  In some cases, such as air travel, it certainly increases those risks, people driving to and from a trailhead where doing so decreases the person-to-person interaction and proximity that would have occurred if they had added to the density of people using their neighborhood trails and sidewalks doesn't increase the risk and if anything it decreases the overall risks of transmission.

We agree in general.  Geographically, travel here, in Alaska, can represent a statistical increase in likelihood that we will encounter someone. It's statistically likely that if you travel out of a population dense area of Alaska and have a chance encounter with someone, they will be from that local region. Perhaps the nearby village will save me when I get into trouble through no fault of my own. 

 It's that whole "stuff" happens philosophy.  When the available scenarios include those which can kill you or someone else, plan for those which can kill you or someone else. 

But yeah, we agree.  I went for a drive the other day. Bought takeout pie from a local business.  The recommendations aren't really intended to correct the behavior of knowledgeable people who understand levels of risk and good social behavior in a crisis. Smart people figure out how to hunker down and interact cautiously with cautious local business.

The recommendations are needed for the foolish and the belligerent. Smart people were keeping to themselves the minute they understood what was going on.  The silly people are always the last to catch on. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.