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The President Donald Trump Thread

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You are reading page 312 of The President Donald Trump Thread. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

There is an article in today's NY Times about the rollback of Obama issued rules concerning coal fired power plants.

The Trump administration admits there will be premature deaths caused by the loosening of the rules.

What for?

Short-term economic gain. Nothing more.

Coal isn't coming back.

Since Trump has been in WH, coal jobs haven't returned to KY, where I live.

THANK GOODNESS!!!

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Anyone here read Nickeled and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich?

Never heard of her. Do enlighten me. She's a Socialist?

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From your source "Minimum wage workers tend to be young. Although workers under age 25 represented only about one-fifth of hourly paid workers, they made up about half of those paid the federal minimum wage or less." I think things might have even changed in the year this was published as labor markets get tighter.

I'm stretching and I know this group is all about the resources, providing evidence and not talking off the top of their head, but I'm doing so with that admission. Often these people aren't breadwinners, or have roommates, spouses making an income, living with parents, etc. not primary breadwinners trying to pay rent, childcare and what not all alone. That said, it does indicate that over 50% are older than 25, a different demographic.

That said there are likely tens and millions of breadwinners making low wages. One source, I read mentioned about 60 million making low wages causing them to struggle.

Again, "tend to be young" and "usually suburban teens" are two entirely different things. The BLS 2017 stats show only 21.3% of minimum-wage workers are "teens," suburban or otherwise. The remaining 78.7% are 20 years old or older. I don't know how you define "usually," but, where I come from, "usually" would have to mean a lot more than 1/5.

I don't want to sound too argumentative because we basically agree on the underlying issues here. But the old stereotype of minimum wage workers being middle-class teens working for pocket money is long dead and buried.

I'm sure that a lot of those workers aren't heads of household, parents, breadwinners; but I'm also sure that a lot of them are. There was a lot of coverage of who is actually working for minimum wage jobs these days a few years ago, when a bunch of states were considering increasing their state minimum wage and there was a push to increase the federal minimum. It was quite eye-opening.

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Again, "tend to be young" and "usually suburban teens" are two entirely different things. The BLS 2017 stats show only 21.3% of minimum-wage workers are "teens," suburban or otherwise. The remaining 78.7% are 20 years old or older. I don't know how you define "usually," but, where I come from, "usually" would have to mean a lot more than 1/5.

I don't want to sound too argumentative because we basically agree on the underlying issues here. But the old stereotype of minimum wage workers being middle-class teens working for pocket money is long dead and buried.

I'm sure that a lot of those workers aren't heads of household, parents, breadwinners; but I'm also sure that a lot of them are. There was a lot of coverage of who is actually working for minimum wage jobs these days a few years ago, when a bunch of states were considering increasing their state minimum wage and there was a push to increase the federal minimum. It was quite eye-opening.

I stand corrected and perhaps was misguided in my search for stats on the number of people that are making minimum wage and are the sole breadwinners.

I have read data, from the link you posted, that people collecting minimum wage are declining to 2.7% of workers in 2016 and down from 3.3 in 2015. Below the 13.4% in 1979 when I was making minimum wage. My guess even moreso this past year.

Which is an entirely different topic than "livable wage". I think minimum wage definitely needs to be raised.

Edited by Tweety

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Never heard of her. Do enlighten me. She's a Socialist?

I have no idea what her politics are, although I imagine she is a liberal progressive author, since her books for the past 30 years, have all examined the myth of the American Dream.

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Again, "tend to be young" and "usually suburban teens" are two entirely different things. The BLS 2017 stats show only 21.3% of minimum-wage workers are "teens," suburban or otherwise. The remaining 78.7% are 20 years old or older. I don't know how you define "usually," but, where I come from, "usually" would have to mean a lot more than 1/5.

I don't want to sound too argumentative because we basically agree on the underlying issues here. But the old stereotype of minimum wage workers being middle-class teens working for pocket money is long dead and buried.

I'm sure that a lot of those workers aren't heads of household, parents, breadwinners; but I'm also sure that a lot of them are. There was a lot of coverage of who is actually working for minimum wage jobs these days a few years ago, when a bunch of states were considering increasing their state minimum wage and there was a push to increase the federal minimum. It was quite eye-opening.

When I lost my middle-class job in 2008, due to the Great Recession, I was forced to take a pharmacy tech position with CVS, while I took classes to get into nursing school.

I availed myself to the CVS tuition reimbursement program, of $1000 a semester. It didn't cover all my costs, but helped.

I was an adult, with a college degree, earning less than $12 an hour to fill prescriptions. The job still pays less than $12 an hour.

Lots of adults with children working this job.

It isn't minimum wage, but it isn't a living wage, either.

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Yesterday was a terrible day for Trump, in several ways.

The biggest is that he will most likely face federal charges upon leaving the WH, based on Michael Cohen's admission of guilt.

I wonder if Trumpsters will finally start to ask themselves why Trump constantly attacks the press?

He knows he is dirty, and he knew this day was coming. So attack the messenger.

I am sure Trumpsters will keep their heads buried deep in sand.

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As far as minimum wage earners being primarily suburban teens: I WISH. Neither of my kids could get these jobs. They were filled by middle-aged folks who lost employment in the 2008 crisis and have yet to even come close to earning what they did back then.

All the fast food and Walmart, etc workers I see in the cities around here are beyond teen-20-something.

They are supporting families, caring for aged parents, and just struggling to make it. Meantime, the teens who would seek these jobs, can't get them.

Things have changed since the 90s when a kid could get a job earning pocket money at Taco Bell or Mickie D's.

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I stand corrected and perhaps was misguided in my search for stats on the number of people that are making minimum wage and are the sole breadwinners.

I have read data, from the link you posted, that people collecting minimum wage are declining to 2.7% of workers in 2016 and down from 3.3 in 2015. Below the 13.4% in 1979 when I was making minimum wage. My guess even moreso this past year.

Which is an entirely different topic than "livable wage". I think minimum wage definitely needs to be raised.

Expanding on that, only 8% of teens, and 1% of adults over 25, make minimum wage or less.

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