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The Congressional Thread

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You are reading page 16 of The Congressional Thread. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

7 hours ago, Spidey's mom said:

Brandon Straka's story highlights this as well.  Since he left the Democrat party and became more conservative after Hillary lost (to which he cried about), he's gotten death threats and been dumped by friends.

I already put his initial video on AN that sped like wildfire all over the internet about a year ago so won't do that here. 

I follow him on FB and Instagram with his #WalkAway movement.  The statements by followers are pretty amazing.  A myriad of folks from all walks of life actually getting along.  

He's having a 1 year anniversary celebration in DC on May 18.  

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He is a gay conservative and no doubt is getting a hard time, but with rhetoric like "   For years now, I have watched as the left has devolved into intolerant, inflexible, illogical, hateful, misguided, ill-informed, un-American, hypocritical, menacing, callous, ignorant, narrow-minded and, at times, blatantly fascistic behavior and rhetoric.”  you get what you give.   

I would dump a friend like that.  I don't have friends like that.  That you would follow him and praise him is no surprise, but disappointing.   But you listen to Limbaugh's rhetoric so there's that.  😂

Me personally, I can understand someone "walking away" but do so with dignity and respect yourself because everyone has a right to be heard.   Why make enemies on your way out?

I'm always curious about these "death threats" that so many people get.  It is something online like "you should die, I hate you".  Or "I have a plan to kill you".  The first is just internet trolling to the extreme and not a death threat.  Just wondering out loud because so many people are claiming death threats.

 

Edited by Tweety

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New report from from Senator Elizabeth Warren and Representative  Pramila Jayapal explains how President Donald Trump's government is allowing corporations to do whatever they want. 

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Rigged Justice 2.0: Government of the Billionaires, by the Billionaires, and for the Billionaires

Executive Summary

Our country is supposed to operate on the principle of Equality under the Law. People or corporations that break the law should be held accountable – regardless of how wealthy, powerful, or well-connected they are.

But just having laws on the books does not guarantee equal justice for all. Laws aren’t effective if they aren’t enforced strictly and consistently - or if they aren’t enforced at all. Our justice system’s soft touch with huge corporations and billionaires is not a new phenomenon. But under President Trump, it is far worse than it has ever been. The Trump administration has treated their billionaire buddies and corporate campaign contributors like the old friends they are: handing them the keys to government regulatory decisions and neutering the federal government’s enforcement tools to address and prevent corporate crime.

And this is no accident. This administration has become a government run by corporate billionaires to benefit corporate billionaires. It has worked tirelessly to put personnel and policies in place that undermine government enforcement efforts at the expense of workers, consumers, taxpayers, public health, and the environment.

 These efforts include:

• Installing corporate insiders in leadership positions across the government – including a former coal lobbyist atop the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); a former oil industry lobbyist to head the Interior Department; a former Wall Street insider to run the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); and a former forprofit college official in a key high-level position at the Department of Education

 • Cutting hundreds of staff responsible for enforcing federal laws that protect the security of our financial markets, the safety of our workplaces, and the quality of our air and water

• Adopting corporate-friendly enforcement policies that handcuff the government’s ability to hold white-collar criminals accountable, including new policies at the Departments of Labor and Justice (DOL and DOJ) that allow corporate wrongdoers to admit their crimes but completely avoid penalties for ripping off workers or bribing foreign governments

This administration’s approach to enforcement has widened the gap between our country’s two justice systems. This new report from Senator Warren and Rep. Jayapal, the second in a series, highlights how the federal government has failed to hold corporations and their executives accountable for crimes and misbehavior. It examines trends across the Trump administration and includes information on specific cases in which the Trump administration failed to hold companies accountable for flouting federal laws, ripping off, or injuring Americans.

Examples of the decline in enforcement, and its impact include:

 • A rapid decline in the number of white collar crime enforcement actions, bringing enforcement activity to a 20-year low - down 33.5 percent from 2013, and down 41 percent from 1998

• A decline in monetary penalties and enforcement actions across nearly every federal government agency, including drops in penalties of more than 80% during the administration’s first 20 months at the DOJ, the EPA, and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

• A failure to punish banks and financial firms that break the law, including a more than 50% decline in the number of cases brought by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), SEC, and DOJ But the decline in enforcement is more than just a statistic. It involves real-life cases of gross corporate malfeasance where the government let corporate lawbreakers off the hook.

Examples of these cases include:

• Syngenta Seeds LLC: In December 2016, the Obama administration sought penalties of over $4.8 million against Syngenta Seeds for exposing 19 workers to an insecticide that causes abdominal pain, dizziness, vomiting, and skin and eye problems. Over a year later, after amending the complaint to add a second alleged violation that exposed an additional 42 workers to the same pesticide –the Trump administration settled the case, imposing only a $150,000 civil penalty, and failing to require Syngenta to admit guilt.

• JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, Barclays, UBS, and Deutsche Bank: Each of these banks have, within the last six years, faced criminal convictions for marketmanipulation schemes. But in December 2017, the Department of Labor granted valuable new waivers from required misconduct penalties for each of them, allowing them to continue managing millions of dollars in corporate retirement plans. Absent these waivers, their criminal convictions would have banned them from these management activities.

 • Citigroup: In January 2019, after Citigroup discriminated against minority borrowers by failing to offer the same mortgage discounts they offered to other borrowers, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) opted not to fine the bank, letting it off with merely a warning and imposing no other consequences.

https://www.warren.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Rigged Justice Report.pdf 

 

 

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If you have watched congressional hearings much you might simply shrug your shoulders.  The misogyny has LONG evident in those settings and now the racist underbelly of the fixation on these women is just barely covered by a veneer of legitimacy. 

Yeah, I don't think she should have gone there necessarily but I'm not going to suggest that there's nothing to see here.

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1 hour ago, toomuchbaloney said:

If you have watched congressional hearings much you might simply shrug your shoulders.  The misogyny has LONG evident in those settings and now the racist underbelly of the fixation on these women is just barely covered by a veneer of legitimacy. 

Yeah, I don't think she should have gone there necessarily but I'm not going to suggest that there's nothing to see here.

Other African American and Latino congresspeople aren't seeing it either.   I'm tending to side with the Speaker more.  AOC saying "And wielding the power to shift it is how we actually achieve meaningful change in this country."  Shows where her true nature lies...in power.  Pretty arrogant for a newly elected person.  But good for her, a whole lot of people seem willing to yield that power to her and she knows how to use it.  But playing the race card really isn't going to win some of us over.  But young people and her social media fans go wild.  She knows she has time and millennials on her side.  

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Meh

We rush to call it "pulling the race card" when people of color speak about their observations and experiences with racism in America. Just the other day some protesters here in Alaska were entering an area with the intent to convince conservative lawmakers to meet with the rest of the legislators in the capital. Was it coincidence that the only protester who was physically restrained from the area by conservative bystanders was a diminutive native woman? Unlikely. These patterns of thinking and behavior are so ingrained they are subconscious.

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1 hour ago, toomuchbaloney said:

Meh

We rush to call it "pulling the race card" when people of color speak about their observations and experiences with racism in America. Just the other day some protesters here in Alaska were entering an area with the intent to convince conservative lawmakers to meet with the rest of the legislators in the capital. Was it coincidence that the only protester who was physically restrained from the area by conservative bystanders was a diminutive native woman? Unlikely. These patterns of thinking and behavior are so ingrained they are subconscious.

Understood.  I don't need convincing that racism is alive and well, and ingrained in people, so providing examples isn't necessary.  

I do believe that the Speaker was calling them out for what she felt was legit reasons and not subconscious racism.  I think the Speaker like the rogues say is resistant to power shifts and radical change, and wants to appear united and keep dirty laundry in the closet, but I don't think she was racist and it's weak on AOC's part to play that card.  

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Rep. Duncan Hunter says his unit 'killed probably hundreds of civilians' in Iraq

 Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., is currently awaiting trial for misusing over $250,000 of federal campaign funds for personal use. But this hasn't stopped him from stirring the pot further.

In an interview with Barstool Sports' Zero Blog Thirty podcast, Hunter said while serving as a Marine field artillery officer in Iraq, his unit had "killed probably hundreds of civilians, if not scores, if not hundreds of civilians" and "probably women and children." 

Hunter's comments came in response to a question about his support for Navy SEAL Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, who was accused of using a knife to kill a teenage Islamic State prisoner in Iraq and posing for a picture with the body, and of other killings of civilians...

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/onpolitics/2019/06/03/indicted-rep-duncan-hunter-admits-his-unit-killed-civilians-iraq/1327264001/

 

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About "Moscow Mitch" he really really doesn't like that.

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 Senator Mitch McConnell is usually impervious to criticism, even celebrating the nasty nicknames critics bestow on him. But Mr. McConnell, the Senate majority leader, is incensed by the name “Moscow Mitch,” and even more miffed that he has been called a “Russian asset” by critics who accuse him of single-handedly blocking stronger election security measures after Russia’s interference in 2016.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/30/us/politics/moscow-mitch-mcconnell.html?action=click&module=Top Stories&pgtype=Homepage

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