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Jules A Jules A (New Member) New Member

Signing up for nursing without researching

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Mods please feel free to nix this if it is totally out of line (or be warned that I might need some censorship in the near future lol) but

OMG I am about ready to kirk out on the next person who posts a long sob story about how they had no clue what nursing entailed, the availability of jobs or the pay.

AND now the plan is to go straight to NP school. Where they will soon be begging for preceptors because they haven't ever met a freaking NP and really have no clue what the job entails, the availability of jobs or the pay...

:banghead:

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I don't like it. Not one little bit.

What I love best about NPs? They have tons of experience as nurses.

I also said something about clinical time "these days". Do the students not get clinical time?

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Ugh, right?

When I was growing up I thought nurses wore white dresses and hats and stood around waiting for nurses to do what doctors said. That's why I never wanted to be one.

I got a Spanish degree then had no idea what to do. Ended up working in the office of a home health company. When those nurses found out I spoke Spanish, they took me on some visits to interpret and I was SO amazed at what nurses could do. I was fascinated by their knowledge base, their independence, and their confidence. Where were the doctors to run the show?? This was incredible. As quickly as possible, I was back in school, getting my nursing degree but, as I went to school, I was working on the local hospital floor getting tech experience.

It wasn't a surprise when I hit the floor as a real nurse. The salary was no surprise nor was the workload or schedule. It was tough, stressful and scary but it was exactly what I expected.

Nursing isn't what I pictured as a child, though. Standing around in my starched white dress and hat waiting for the doctor to tell me what to do next...

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Do the students not get clinical time?

They do but it isn't much especially compared to physicians and PA hours which I believe was initially set up this way counting on the NP having nursing experience. Sadly my sign off list for the FNP program was filled with stupid stuff that had my precepting Doc shaking their head like "provides empathetic and holistic care" blah blah.

I quickly learned that our actual education inside the school was largely nursing fluff, sigh, so I arranged my own clinical experiences geared toward the environment I wanted to eventually practice in which was also the area I had my RN experience. I also picked my own preceptors because I wanted to be with physicians who I knew were competent providers. I guess its like anything there are good, bad and somewhere in between providers in all fields and I wanted to make sure I learned from the ones who knew what they were doing.

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I read that one on the other side this morning and was thinking WTH? I work with many young nurses who have

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I don't like it. Not one little bit.

What I love best about NPs? They have tons of experience as nurses.

Not all of them do unfortunately. Sadly, it sometimes shows on the direct entry NP graduates. They may learn assessments, but years of experience teaches you the nuances that you miss without experience. I love NPs with years of nursing experience

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Not all of them do unfortunately. Sadly, it sometimes shows on the direct entry NP graduates. They may learn assessments, but years of experience teaches you the nuances that you miss without experience. I love NPs with years of nursing experience

Me too, and that's mostly what I have worked with. Now I'm in a school, so I'm not likely to encounter working with a fresh from school NP with no floor experience. Thank God.

RNinIN, if they can't handle the floors, how can they handle the responsibilities of being a practitioner? I mean, it's not literal poo, but it's still a lot of **** !

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RNinIN, if they can't handle the floors, how can they handle the responsibilities of being a practitioner? I mean, it's not literal poo, but it's still a lot of **** !

I swear it is HARD and I'm no wuss. I love, love, love it but never in a million years expected it to be so stressful.

Was talking with another older gal the other day and we wondered if our age makes us more prone to feeling the gravity aka stress of what we do? I meet so many young ones who are fearless and seem oblivious to the fact that they don't know what they don't know and have just been handed a prescription pad!

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I swear it is HARD and I'm no wuss. I love, love, love it but never in a million years expected it to be so stressful.

Was talking with another older gal the other day and we wondered if our age makes us more prone to feeling the gravity aka stress of what we do? I meet so many young ones who are fearless and seem oblivious to the fact that they don't know what they don't know and have just been handed a prescription pad!

That's not fearless, that's ignorance.

Jules, you will be fine. More than fine.

Hey, even NOADLS says it's hard, and cutting in to his Candy Crush time. I have NO DOUBT it's hard.

I have neither the intelligence nor the ambition to pursue it.

What is about NP that you like? What made you take the plunge?

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There were two things that got me thinking of doing the NP. The first was watching two attendings on an acute psychiatric unit prescribe and seeing the amazing difference in outcome. One was really good and the other not so much. It was so obvious that not only was medicine magic but there is a huge difference in someone who knows what they are doing and someone who doesn't. As a RN we were monitoring, assessing and choosing which prns to administer based on the patient's presentation and our knowledge of how we have seen medications work in other patients. I actually got quite good at being a psych RN and really enjoyed it. I also worked on an inpatient adolescent unit which I loved but those kids kicked the crap out of us on a regular basis. Even as a spry 40yo I knew my shelf life was limited if I wanted to continue with this population and although I still spend a lot of my time cruising the unit and standing on my feet, I'm not doing the hand to hand combat nearly as often, lol.

What I love about being a NP is being able to prescribe whatever I want for my patients rather than having to pick from what someone else ordered. It is so rewarding when I see patients improve especially those with a psychotic process. I love managing medical detox for benzos and alcohol. I'm well known in my area, make excellent money and the gravity of prescribing medications keeps my neurons firing full speed. Plus all the perks for medical staff are pretty cool.

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Are you still going to be working with adolescents?

As a SN, I find them joyful and tragic. The mentally ill/depressed ones? I'm a bleeding heart. I can't imagine that all the time.

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Are you still going to be working with adolescents?

As a SN, I find them joyful and tragic. The mentally ill/depressed ones? I'm a bleeding heart. I can't imagine that all the time.

I'm not a new NP and at least for now will continue with the punky adolescents. I love/hate? them, lol. They are amazing and I admire their resilience in the face of the abuse and neglect that most of them have experienced. Things are changing for the worse when dealing with juveniles. Many of their parents were these kids and have zero respect for any kind of social rules or authority which of course translates into their children's responses. Our society is so politically correct that our hands are often tied with regard to rules, consequences and requiring they take responsibility for their actions so the frustration level is up but I'm not done just yet.

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