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3ringnursing

3ringnursing

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  1. 3ringnursing

    Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait, or learned behavior?

    I like that line of reasoning. I guess inappropriate, and/or some forms of entitlement behavior stem from as many different factors amongst people (i.e., patient's) as there are different patterns of snowflakes - each one unique and individual based upon the person in question. So given this line of thought, it can become entangled in both genetic and learns responses? Nature plus nurture? Your thoughts make perfect sense if I am interpreting them correctly. The patients I am thinking about specifically are patient's who don't also have concurrent behavioral health issues. I'm genuinely curious about this type of mindset, as to how this comes to be (if it's not a behavior carried over from childhood). How do some patient's arrive at the crossroads of this type of thinking? I personally have encountered a small percentage of patient's that truly feel all their wants should be granted right now with special disposition, despite the fact that they themselves may have played a part in creating the bad scenario they are currently suffering. Kind of like, "The rules are fine, but they apply to everyone else, just not me" mentality. Many of these same patient's also do not seem to give a fig about the fact that their demands or behavior geared toward having their wants granted on the instant may possibly have an impact on how addressing the needs of the next patient may also be effected, due to being a high user of medical resources without emergent need. It's possible these patients may all be very nice people in their everyday lives, I don't know - but yelling, threatening, or demanding while asking for something sure seems to leave a bad taste in my mouth so to speak while interacting with them. I do try to cut them some slack while trying my best to remain cool and unruffled, but privately here? I admit I feel frustrated and irritated at times on the inside (like geez, didn't your parents ever teach you manners?). Please and thank you sure goes a long way in my opinion, and it's free. Sometimes I just want to say, "I'm not a genie in a bottle".
  2. 3ringnursing

    Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait, or learned behavior?

    Sure, we can add that too. All personal experiences are welcome in this discussion. I'm not really asking anything specific, so any interpretations are also welcome.
  3. 3ringnursing

    Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait, or learned behavior?

    I have a few examples. I am truly not trying to be snarky to patients in general (I've been one enough times myself) but there seems to be a certain subset of patient's I am frequently encountering lately and I would genuinely like thoughts - even if you personally believe I am unkind, for which I am sorry. • Patient X calls telephone triage at 4 pm on a Saturday because he ran out of his Percocet Rx 6 days early despite having a pain contract agreement promising to use the Rx as ordered, and only call for Rx refills during business hours (this is not the the first time doing so). Patient is argumentive and wants his PCP to call in a Rx now. Patient calls every month on weekends outside of clinic hours to demand a bridge Rx. Patient calls several times throughout the day to argue despite being told the is nothing that can be done until the provider is back in the office. Finally the triage nurse contacts the PCP who is not on call - provider agrees to give patient enough Rx medication to get through the weekend, however patient must agree to come in for an appointment with PCP on Monday to discuss the frequent requests for refills of his narcotic pain medication too soon. Patient gets Rx's free at our clinic pharmacies, but as our pharmacies are all closed on weekends the patient has to have Rx called into an unaffiliated chain pharmacy instead and pay out of pocket. Patient becomes angry, states he does not have the money to pay for Rx. Patient calls back 5 additional times to yell at triage nurse and complain it is not fair. • Patient Y wants to seen right away by PCP therefore arrives at clinic as a walk-in without an appointment. All the providers are already overbooked and cannot squeeze another patient in to their schedule as a walk-in. Patient becomes angry and starts yelling at the check in desk, and is not happy with proffered compromise to either accept an appointment the following day, or go to urgent care instead, because patient says their copay at urgent care is too high. Patient calls telephone triage 4-5 times angry because the triage nurse cannot schedule an appointment for her that day either, and she will not agree to try home care advice. Patient threatens to get a lawyer and sue everyone - including the triage nurse attempting to help her. • Patient Z had an appointment earlier that day but was a no-show. Patient elects to go to the ER later that night instead for symptoms of productive cough with green sputum. Patient calls telephone triage nurse from the ER waiting room because she is angry for being made to wait 3 hours, and wants to speak to someone in charge: because it is 1030 pm there is no one in charge available, just the one lone telephone triage nurse on duty. Telephone triage nurse attempts to explain that we have no control over the wait time in other medical facilities. Patient becomes enraged, and begins to yell they don't want to wait for 12 hours to be seen. The triage nurse attempts to calm the patient by offering her another clinic appointment in the morning instead with home care for the interim, but patient refuses. Patient calls back telephone triage nurse roughly every 30 minutes to complain about the ER wait time until the shift finally ends for the triage nurse.
  4. 3ringnursing

    Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait, or learned behavior?

    Not actively including children in this discussion. I work with adults. I have no data about children, and cannot add any pertinent information about those under 18 years of age. Although those who wish to may. My focus is adult behaviors, although I am leaving the forum broad for any thoughts on this matter as it has been recurring for me in my line of work recently.
  5. Hello Allnurses! A question I have been pondering for a very long time now is in regard to the topic of Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait (and if so, does snowflakism seem to be a dominant or recessive trait? Does one need two snowflake donor parents, or does this trait naturally become dominant?) or is snowflakism indeed a learned behavior leading one to believe environmental factors play a greater impact on developing the disabling trait of snowflakism? Thoughts?
  6. 3ringnursing

    Fellow Nurse with a no moral compass

    Wow is this for real? Do nothing ... time will take care of it's self.
  7. 3ringnursing

    August 2017 Caption Contest - Select $100 Winner!

    "I didn't know anyone was in the room! Oh geez ..."
  8. 3ringnursing

    Has Our Privacy Just Been Sold to the Highest Bidder?

    It's funny you should mention this: tacked on to the middle of your article are adverts from my last online Google search. I wanted to laugh - but I was too scared.
  9. 3ringnursing

    Help! My Husband Snores Like A Category 5 Hurricane!

    I'm so sorry for your loss. This is what frustrates me the most. His laissez faire attitude that it's no big deal. We've all seen diabetics, or people Dx'd with HTN who take this attitude and it doesn't work out so well. He thinks he's special and therefore it doesn't apply to him. I hope someday he doesn't reach the point of no return when he discovers how wrong he is.
  10. 3ringnursing

    Help! My Husband Snores Like A Category 5 Hurricane!

    I'm fairly sure I don't have OSA, but why not? There is worse things than spending the night doing a sleep study (like listening to the rumbling buzz from across the hall - it sounds like a bear in hibernation, or a nest of dragons). I know I talk in my sleep, a lot. He's complained about it, and I've woken up talking or giggling on occasion too. Yeah, that must be pretty annoying, but it's not all night long. Not that I will ever admit that to him. :angrybird9: I really appreciate everyone's suggestions. Thank you - again, I will keep anyone who is interested posted on the out come.
  11. 3ringnursing

    Help! My Husband Snores Like A Category 5 Hurricane!

    Really? That's some cool information to have in my arsenal when I go on the frontal attack of the Battle of the Snoring. He has terrible buyer's remorse (the last time we bought a couch, love seat and recliners I believe he looked in every store in town. Researched everything for best price, quality, etc … then felt he made the wrong choice and perseverated on it for weeks). That store won't know what hit them when he goes looking for a mask! LOLOLOL … this should be entertaining! :)
  12. 3ringnursing

    Help! My Husband Snores Like A Category 5 Hurricane!

    That's a great idea. I'll check it out. First I need to convince him he needs it - I thinking putting his CPOX on his finger and filming him with my cellphone is a good place to start. I enlisted the help of my son as my accomplice who is on board. I'll keep you all posted.
  13. 3ringnursing

    Help! My Husband Snores Like A Category 5 Hurricane!

    I hear ya - my husband broke his leg on a pony at 2 y.o., this was the reason he said he rocks that leg back and forth while falling to sleep. I married him when I was 17 and now I'm 50 … as of 15 months ago when I moved into another bedroom he still did it, and likely still does. Every comforter we own is all pilly from that back and forth motion on his side of the bed. I find it funny the cats moved with me into my room when I got the heck out of Dodge in favor of some sleep. Apparently the noise kept them awake too.
  14. 3ringnursing

    Help! My Husband Snores Like A Category 5 Hurricane!

    This I know (perhaps I have a bit of denial too?) but I guess I hope something will create change. This truly sucks. From what I'm reading here denial seems to be mass rampant with a certain population of snorer's. I'm not sure how that can even be for him - he has woken himself more than once on a really good honk/tweet/snore (looking rather surprised) that had enough suction action going on to suck in a bowling ball. He's an OT, and spends all day working with various patient populations reteaching various life skills. He couldn't possibly want to join his patients? I fear this is the direction Mr. Stubborn is heading. His mother has mild to moderate dementia that is worsening as time passes. I know for fact she snores too. I thank everyone for their input and for sharing their own stories. That is very giving of you all. Much obliged.
  15. 3ringnursing

    Help! My Husband Snores Like A Category 5 Hurricane!

    He swore the Breathe Right strips would fix the problem for years: nada. He sure tried though. They were stuck to sheets, the floor - you name it. He swore it was because he was congested due to allergies … then nasal congestion due to a cold … then it would improve when he lost weight - but he hasn't been overweight for years, in fact he's quite slender now. Denial: not just de river in Egypt … What he's got going on seems to be a saggy soft palate that sounds like it closes like a lead curtain, flapping against his airway in an oddly rumbling honk. He say he fights against the CPAP - that it tries to deliver a breathe when he is exhaling. I've never heard another CPAP user complain of that, and I've asked many - patients, coworkers, friends, and neighbors. I've begged him to see our dentist to discuss the possibility of what a Rx mouth guard may do to keep that airway open: "No". Or check into the head splints that are advertised online that are supposed to hold the airway open (I admit they're not beautiful, but after 34 years of marriage my quality of sleep is more important than his beauty): "That's stupid". Perhaps go see an ENT to see if surgery to trim what appears to be excess, floppy soft palate is an option: "No way!". At one time he was so tired he'd nod out in odd places (I suspect red lights while driving). He was Rx'd provigil, but upon discovering it was a stimulant he refused to use it. He can literally fall asleep in less than 5 minutes - the snoring (at first a wheezy accordion of sound) starts by the 6th-7th minute. Every night after dinner he routinely nods off in the recliner, snoring - after dinner entertainment at our house. My son and I just can't get through to him, but he's not unintelligent. He's stubborn as a mule, and I can't seem to get through to him. And I am very afraid for him.
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