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FraidoCat

FraidoCat

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  1. FraidoCat

    Breaking News. The T-Rex was ate vegetables.

    Meyer supports ID, which is not the same as Creationism.
  2. FraidoCat

    Breaking News. The T-Rex was ate vegetables.

    No one is denying them their first amendment rights. That's not the issue. We're not comparing artwork either, we are discussing the origin of life on this planet, the age of our planet and the proper tools to ascertain the correct information. Religion simply can not compete with science in answering these questions because they are using too different tools. The first, is stories with no evidence, and the second the scientific process based on observations. This was a home schooling community. I disagree that it's okay for them to teach what they are teaching, because those were small children that have yet to develop the proper intellectual capabilities to question what they are learning. The "teachers" were teaching those children lessons about the origins of the world that are not correct. How is that okay?
  3. FraidoCat

    Christians...help me out here......

    You're point? I don't think those are good reasons to vote for a person. Are you claiming, Pierette, that people voted for Obama because he is a black person? Voting on the basis of gender and/or race are just as stupid as voting on the basis of religion. I did not single out religion, in fact I was quite clear that there are many reasons for what ails the world. I was referring to religion because it was/is the topic of this thread and I do believe that it creates problems. I think it stands to reason that a fundamentalist Christian will vote for issues that concern them. Like, the abolition of abortion, for example. Let's assume for a moment that one day, this country elects enough Congresscritters and a prez who are anti-abortion. And together, they do the will of the the majority and put an end to legal abortion. My first question is, what do you think would be the outcome of such a measure? First, those who are truly desperate to rid themselves of the unborn would seek help to do it. They would have to take advantage of shady services and would risk injury, or even death. Not to mention, they could do jail time or pay hefty fines for their "crime". So, such a legislative action would not actually put an end to abortion, it would however put an end to a woman's access to safe health care. My second question is, what are we going to do with all those hungry mouths? Undoubtedly, many women would opt to carry the unborn to term because they simply do not want to risk injury, jail, fines or death. They would do this even though they know there is no way they can afford to care for a child. 50% of all pregnancies are not planned, and a fair deal of them are to low income homes. So, another mouth goes on the welfare rolls, and the Christian Right would have something else to complain about. But no one would win. My last question is, who would such a measure help? And before someone mentions, the unborn, let me remind you that a woman who wants to get an abortion, but does not because it's illegal, probably isn't going to treat her child like the joy of her world, and perhaps the kid would be better off not being born at all. And it certainly doesn't help the citizen, who has to do the heavy mind work of deciding whether or not they are going to allow children to starve in droves, or ante up and pay. So, I ask again, who does it help? How does it benefit the citizens of the USA to criminalize abortion? If we are ever in a position in this country where such a thing were to happen, no good would come of it. And we could rightly thank God for that.
  4. FraidoCat

    Christians...help me out here......

    Well, not exactly Leslie. The only way to acknowledge and/or understand God (through the Abrahamic Faiths) is through holy texts and to listen to religious leaders. When one puts their faith into these interpretations they are by extension putting their faith in God. And if God tells you to kill, you kill. If God tells you to abandon your life, in order to pursue a Crusade in the holy land, you do it. So, it has everything to do with God, who most likely is a fiction, but a very powerful one nonetheless.
  5. FraidoCat

    Christians...help me out here......

    The question for me is, does a system do the most good for the majority? And in the case of places with a heavy religious element, the answer is most certainly no. Saudi Arabia, for example has a long history of oppressing women. Now, these human rights abuses can be viewed from a sociological stand-point. If they are then we have to acknowledge that Sharia Law, which is influenced by Islam, which is informed by The Koran, is merely a means of running a society. As outside observers (still thinking from a socioligical perspective) we would have no right to judge what we don't understand. The goal would merely be to understand. But we do judge, because we ask questions about the source, which is the Koran in this example. And while you might call Sharia Law a distortion or perhaps a perversion of Islam, there is an opposing argument that suggests this is a valid interpretation, and that it is theologically correct. Regarding the countries run by atheists, I can only assume that you are speaking about the Soviet Union (and I might add here that not everyone in a position of power was an atheist). And I agree with you that they had a very bad record on human rights abuses. But atheism is not a belief, it is the absence of belief. Just because your leaders suddenly decide that religion is illegal, doesn't mean you will stop believing. The USSR made a grave mistake when it failed to recognize the religious element of its people, but, blaming atheism for the attrocities makes no sense. It wasn't their goal to be atheists, there was no atheist book telling them to kill certain people, they killed and committed attrocities for purely political reasons. Now that doesn't it make it okay, but, it's not the same. Now regarding religious reasons for killing. You have already brought up the Crusades, Inquisitions, etc... Now I will be the first to admit that the Crusades, for example, were not fought solely on the grounds of religion. But they were in fact, sanctioned by it. It was a religious war supported by the representative of God. The Pope. So, by extension it was the will of God. And, if you are peasant feasting on tree bark (quite literally they did eat bark in some cases) and you are told by your lord that you must go to the Holy Land and wage war for God, you are not going to argue, you are going to go and fight for God. That doesn't make you a sociopath, that makes you a believer. Even to this day, the world is negatively impacted with religion. It might be more subtle, but it hinders progress. Think of voting and be honest with yourself when I ask this question. How many people, do you think vote with their religious beliefs in mind? I read some numbers recently that suggest 76% of Americans call themselves Christians and 45% of that percentage consider themselves fundamentalists (meaning they believe that God created the world in six, twenty-four hour days, that Jonah was actually swallowed by a whale, etc... ). Now, when fundamentalist cast their ballots, how do you think they are going to vote? They are going to vote the way the think God wants them to vote (think anti-abortion, prayer in school, etc.... ). Is this an informed decision? No, it's religion screwing up the world, plain and simple.
  6. FraidoCat

    Christians...help me out here......

    What I find particularly bothersome about your post Elvish is there doesn't seem to be any accountability for religion itself. I don't understand how you can simply say, that religion plays no part in what ails the world, when historical data proves otherwise. You claim (and you could be right) that there are sociopaths all over the world and that they merely use relgious doctrine as an excuse to carry out their bad deeds. However, don't you think it's odd, that some of the most backwards places on the planet have a heavy religious element? And further, that these places are home to unspeakable acts of violence, does indicate to me at least, that fundamentalist religion is a bane to the world, not a boon. It keeps us in the dark and keeps us distracted, and that is the least of our trouble regarding religion, at worst, it kills us, and it keeps us groveling to a man in the sky when what we should be doing is taking responsibility for ourselves as citizens of the world. The United States is certainly no exception. We have the highest homocide of any developed country in the world. Now, I will not lay that responsibiliy solely at the feet of religious, but I do atleast acknowledge it as a factor.
  7. FraidoCat

    Christians...help me out here......

    I take issue with the idea that violent Islam is just a mere distortion, it is an interpretation, not a pervesion. To offer another perspective, think of the book of Leviticus in the Old Testament. I can not remember chapter and verse, but it clearly instruct people murders those men, who lay with other men. How is one to interpret that, in a tolerant, politically correct way, so as not to offend the masses of Jewish, Christian and Muslim individuals? As far as a crazy person using religion as justification for an act, isn't it more likely that said person was nurtured in religious doctrine that actually encourages violence? If my holy book says that I must kill infidels because God wants it to be so, then I must kill infidels in order to get into heaven. Another example; (from the New Testament and the Old Testament) if my holy book says that I must murder homosexuals, then I must do it. It is the will of God.
  8. FraidoCat

    Breaking News. The T-Rex was ate vegetables.

    Noted and respected. If you will please, delete the offending sentence...
  9. FraidoCat

    Breaking News. The T-Rex was ate vegetables.

    I didn't write the title. I don't know who did. Perhaps you could take your own advice and move beyond your "delicate sensibilities", or not. Either way, please do not derail this into another "poor persecuted American Christian" thread.
  10. FraidoCat

    A Cat's Guide to Living With People

    :lol2: A fine article. I find it's best to claim certain areas in the dwelling. For example, the chair by the window is mine, so is the stack of papers underneath the coffee table. If you establish these boundaries early and make an honest effort at keeping them, your human will learn the ropes and respect that he/she is merely a servant.
  11. FraidoCat

    Breaking News. The T-Rex was ate vegetables.

    Yes of course, but when we question science we are supposed to use the scientific process. Religious doctrine is not an appropriate tool to assertain the validity of the theory of evolution.
  12. FraidoCat

    Breaking News. The T-Rex was ate vegetables.

    A very well rounded response and I agree completely with the part in bold. School children should have the option to take a religious studies class (as an elective) to learn about creationism. It has no place in any science course.
  13. FraidoCat

    Breaking News. The T-Rex was ate vegetables.

    When I watched that clip, I was reminded of the scene in The Holy Grail when King Arthur comes across the knight in black. He hacks the Knight to pieces, literally, but the Knight would not surrender, rather like creationists. Decades of research firmly ground the theory of evolution, but a few fundamentals hang on. Still, it's enough to make 50% of the American population doubt evolution all together.
  14. I found this youtube clip from the show Nightline interesting. Apparently a small Christian-based home schooling community that believes in Creationism leads a gang of youngsters on a field trip to a natural history museum. The claims made by the guides are absurd and arguably dangerous. But, what I found most disturbing is how the tour guides described the theory of evolution as a mere religion, on equal footing with creationism. In the beginning of the clip the reporter reveals that some 50% of Americans do not believe in the theory of evolution. The clip is a few years old, but still relevant today.
  15. FraidoCat

    America has lost its identity

    Spot on. E Pluribus Unum. We have always been fragmented and given to factionalism.
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