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Saysfaa

Saysfaa

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  1. Saysfaa

    Looking for Cruelty free makeup

    Arbonne.
  2. Saysfaa

    unwanted discussions regarding religion

    StNeotser, you are assuming they are trying to peddle it. They very well might be; some people do, of course. But they might also be sharing their life. Sort of like my mother-in-law talks about my neices that she babysits, my brother talks about the business he is trying to get going on his own, my sister talks about her school. None of them have much else in their lives right now and they are passionately interested in these topics. So they talk about them, and even the other things they talk about tend to refer to these things.
  3. Saysfaa

    unwanted discussions regarding religion

    The same way you would let someone know you aren't interested if it were any other topic - things like looking away and/or very little responsiveness in your eyes, dismissive or withdrawing body language, politely changing the subject, etc.
  4. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    from page 14, top post... "i feel shy dogs and dog-aggressive dogs, are ONE GREAT REASON to adopt ADULT dogs that no one seems to admit is valid great reason to avoid taking home a puppy," I think there are many valid reasons to avoid taking home a puppy. This reason doesn't rank very high on my list but I'm willing to go at least as far as agreeing that it is one of the valid reasons. As for your last post to me, Jean Marie... no problem. Incidently, Collies come from Scotland and England, and possibly Ireland, source sources say the border counties of Scotland and England which is were Border Collies originated. But it is unlikely their coats were developed in response to the weather because the they weren't excessive until sometime later than the early 20th century. I'm not sure if you were talking to me about the shy syndrome thing, if so, then no, I don't know of entire litters being stricken with it or even every litter of parents who have produced it but I don't see what that has to do with my point. I haven't looked at research in the relationship between personality traits and brain structure in dogs but I have looked at a fair amount of such research in humans. So far it tells us there is some correlation. However, correlation doesn't prove causation; even if there is causation, correlation doesn't indicate which is the cause and which is the effect.
  5. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    From page 13, last post "I myself, do not always follow every rule i hear of, in every situation. Earlier on thread, someone without a fence, but did not need a fence, was upset he could not adopt. IN that case, i'd just say i had a fence. I do not follow every rule i hear. but, that's just me." This is why so many rescue organizations require a home visit before considering an applicant. And sometimes multiple home visits per year as long as you have the dog (not that they always do them, but that they can if they wish or else just take the dog).
  6. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    "When I asked the owner (a new client), she said oh yeah he's like that" ugh, what do people think?
  7. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    "there are still some breeds who don't need brushing" Sigh, I know. I have a lab now. She sheds a lot and enjoys the brushing but if I don't get to it for a few days she doesn't matt. But I love collies (in all of their various breeds). They were my first love and what my family always had back through generations and they suit my personality so they are the most comfortable and I seem to click with them the easiest. With many other breeds, I have to pay more attention to what I'm doing. I love my lab, too, (she is pretty darn close to perfect for us) but partly because she isn't a particularly typical lab. It isn't just the brushing that makes collies not a good fit for me right now so I guess it ultimately doesn't directly matter. It just makes me sad that it is harder to take care of them for no good reason that I can see.
  8. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    "It might be, that what i value in dog, does not match other people's ideas." I'm glad. The world is a much better place because people value different things. I'm very, very happy that you value the things you mentioned and that a really lot of other people do too.
  9. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    1920's rough coated collie.... these are Terhune's (very famous author and collie breeder) vs todays (from AKC Collie website)... and sometimes in real life... Mine's coat wasn't as full as either of these but my neighbor's collie's was despite being a female. Mine never matted (except a bit behind the ears) but it took many hours several times a week even when she didn't run through the burrs. I could be wrong about the border collie, I don't follow the shows and I guess I haven't revisited the issue in quite a few years. I included them because mine's coat looked about like this.... and yes, very easy to brush and shortly after they reached akc provisional status, I started seeing pictures and meeting border collies that looked like shelties their coats were so full. I don't see such pictures today, though. And, come to think of it, haven't for quite some time.
  10. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    Have you read "Where the Red Fern Grows?" and if you did, looked for what the dogs do rather than what an English teacher might have pointed out? Especially, what makes Ole Dan and Lil Anne more effective than the other dogs at the competition. It is similar to Agility - most dogs will chase prey just as most dogs can do agility if you are talking about fun and hanging out doing something. That is wonderful that they do (incidently, I thoroughly enjoy it too and have no desire to compete even against myself, I like the "new tricks to learn" aspect of it). But if you are looking for a dog that can excel at it, to be quick and precise and accurate, you aren't going to pick a pug. -------------------------------------- I know we will never run out of dogs. If we ever do stop puppy mills and back yard breeders and irresponsibility (the oops litters) we will still not run out of dogs. It is easy enough to increase numbers that ethical breeders could do it if they still exist. If not, then we will ship dogs in from other countries, as some people already do.... just like they ship them into the northeast from the south only not nearly to that extent yet. I think we will run out of homes ever faster as we make having a dog ever harder and riskier, when you systematically weed out the stable (physically, tempermentally) you are left with ever increasing percentages of unstable. You can link to examples of ethical breeders and/or lists of criteria for ethical breeders if you wish. I've seen a lot of them and I'm not looking for a dog, but I like exploring dog related stuff. I'll probably not get into evaluating them here, though. Hm, you will find they are very much slanted toward the show world with some leaway for the working dog world. I don't remember defining designer - I looked back, oh... I was trying to allow for your use of of the term as planned characteristics so that it includes really close to all breeds. I meant rare, unusual whether it is the latest fashion craze (like teacups or breed crosses) or a new import (like, meh, all the examples that come to mind aren't very recent.... like dogge de bourdeau was right after the movie Turner and Hooche came out.)
  11. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    I had read all the posts. What you said and say again about the recessive fear-aggressive gene is true as far as it goes but the advantage to ethical breeders is that you don’t see the pup in the box and his siblings and his mother and, if you are lucky, his father. You indirectly see all of his siblings and half siblings and nieces and nephews, both grandmothers, both grandfathers, all eight greats, all sixteen great greats, and all of his cousins because the breeder has been evaluating the temperments of his own dogs and those of the breeding lines associated with his line. That is part of what makes him an ethical breeder another part is that he is willing to do more about that than note it. Recessive stuff does occasionally pop up but it is nothing like the pup in the box and his parents that you describe. I have seen a few puppy mills setting up what looks like legitimate rescues but usually it is very well meaning people who can’t save “this” dog. It is common, although not universal, for rescues to rescue directly from puppy mills. Look on petsmart, you will see heartbreaking stories in the past histories of “retired breeding stock” and sometimes even among the puppies but they don’t necessary tell that part with the puppies. They call it rescuing, not buying, and think it is different because the puppy mill doesn’t make any money. Quite often they rescue pays a little bit but even if they don’t they save the puppy mills the costs (in money, time, hassle) of disposing of the dogs they can’t sell or use anymore. Sometimes the rescuers think they are making progress because the puppy mills agree to breed less for a while or even shut down completely but the puppy mills know how to work the system and either planned to decrease anyway for a while (they misjudged their market - that is why they have extra dogs around) or they shut that location down and open another somewhere else. Oh, you are NOT the only one using “never.” Or “always adopt” which the other version of it. And I probably shouldn’t have been that pointed as it was kinda rude to be (sorry about that ) that is only one of the messages that would help shut ethical breeders down along with puppy mills (and quite often instead of the puppy mills.) The ones that charge 10s of 1000s of dollars for a pup are the top end show breeders (and possibly a few high end working kennels) and some of the designer (exotic in some way, not planned) breeds. They charge that because they can. That is what you consider not shutting down ethical breeders? Hm, kinda my point, especially since neither of us are very supportive of AKC's world. We need the moderate, reasonable breeders who are not aiming at the extremes. I doubt you will see the difference but these are not the “backyard breeders.” Backyard breeders don’t follow temperaments across generations or the do hip and elbow certs or eye certs ect. (Although, for some breeds now, I suppose it does run up into the tens of thousands of dollars esp for the breeds that can barely birth a pup or two a litter and/or that are pretty much a total genetic mess). It goes unnoticed because you say that and then follow it with how “that” situation isn’t one of them…. Like the comment about border collies making coon dogs. Uhm, no. You can probably approximate some of what a coon dog does just like you can probably get a coon dog to cross a balance, weave, and creep through the tunnel but it isn’t going to be an Agility dog on anything but a casual level. Inherently dysfunctional” is one of beefs I have against AKC too… I include the show coats on rough coated collies and border collies in “inherently dysfunctional.” “I am sorry you were unable to bring out the best in BCs, like i say, and like everything you read about the breed will say----------the breed is not for everyone. I know TONS of lovely, well behaved BCs like my own, and to slap the entire breed as "boneheads" displays a lack of experience with the breed, and i am sorry you ended up with a "fearful" dog.” I'm sorry I was unclear. My border collies were delights and a perfect fit for my life at the time - less so for the last one I had because my life changed but we figured it out. Not boneheaded or fearful at all, neither were the rough coated collies. I don't want the breeds of the bonehead/fearful ones to sidetrack the point. I was just saying I know what requiring grooming and exercise can mean and what dogs that require a lot of work mean.
  12. Saysfaa

    Can Dogs Handle a Nomadic Lifestyle?

    The nomadic part is unlikely to be a problem from the dog's persepctive. Although, a crate is an even better idea than usual because of the sense of security it provides (assuming you take the time needed to introduce the crate). Having a dog will limit your choices in finding lodging, though, which could be a problem when you move so often. I don't know how much, I haven't tried to move all that often with dogs but at the least you will probably spend extra time looking and it might even limit which travel assignments you are willing to or able to accept. (I've never been a travel nurse or moved with a small dog, though, so maybe it isn't as bad as finding temporary housing with a big dog or as finding lodging with a dog while vacationing).
  13. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    I disagree. I will never “adopt” a dog from a rescue again. Partly because of the attitudes of so many of the people who push adoption, partly because too many “rescues” are nothing more than alternative marketing entities for unethical breeders particularly puppy mills, partly because I have no desire to support organizations that want to shut down ethical breeders or that push policies that would shut them down (like pushing messages such as never buy a dog), partly for other reasons, and mostly because I have no desire to co-own my dog which is all the semi-palatable (read – notalternative marketing entities for unethical breeders) rescue organizations will allow. I willlook for an ethical breeder when and if I am ready for another dog. Partly because I want the (sensible) health checks and puppy immunizations, and, yes, Iknow there are thousands of perfectly healthy dogs on death row but I don’tknow which ones they are and, for the most part, neither does anyone else. Partly because I want the well-done early socialization. And, yes, I know there arethousands of beautifully tempered dogs in the pounds but, again, I don’t knowwhich ones they are and my experience has been that rescuers aren’t muchhelp. Often because they don’t know nearly as much as they think they do and/or they are so bent on their mission that they miss on stuff they might actually know. I also know a bad early start can be overcome. I know how to do it; I’ve successfully done it. I don’t like doing it. Given achoice I would not have a dog rather than do that. I take care of the issues that come up with my dogs, whatever they are, but I see no reason to jump into the pool when Idon’t want to swim. Partly because I support the ethical breeding of dogs because I don’t like whathappens when there are too few ethical breeders. I think “ethical” includes a lot of thingsthat most people probably don’t (like variety in the gene pool – such as mixing English/American &/or field/bench strains of labs) and doesn’t include a lot that most people probably do (like AKC – I’m not opposed to registering, just to the agenda intrinsic to the show world and the bottle-necked genetic pools). And yes, I have taken dogs and cats from their kennels to (well, it wasn’t a gaschamber, it was anesthetic followed by lethel injection) on many days as Iworked as a kennel attendant (cleaned, fed, watered, mostly. Also bathed, walked, comforted, groomed fur and nails, gave medicine to, and moved forvarious reasons, and on and on). I’ve shed tears over it also, although I didn’t give many (any?) of them a last hug…they usually don’t like that under the best of circumstances and after theyknow you well, it adds to their stress, and, for most of the dogs and cats in that situation - it is a pretty sure fire way of getting bitten. So, I guess I get to talk? I also think pushing rescue to the exclusion of common sense is a somewhat strange agenda. A speutered house mutt in the home of an intact dog isn’t going to add to the population. Incidentally,there is nothing wrong with wanting an easy dog – easy grooming, easyexercising, easy training (ultra willing and somewhat dumb), easy to live with (laid back and absolutely no baggage),easy vet visits. I’ve had rough-coated collies, border collies, in-your-face-attitudes-all-the-time boneheads, fearful projects - and thoroughly enjoyed all of them in the times and places they each were mine. But the alternatives can be even better and are certainly more appropriate for most families.
  14. Saysfaa

    Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

    "show me a breed that is NOT a designer dog.." Carolina Dogs (the real ones with the distinct behavioral traits, not the feral lab-mix-types) Pariahs Basenji (the root stock in Africa)
  15. Saysfaa

    I think my daddy's right and other opinions from myself

    "So, my dad had said that he thinks that it will be the American people that get the economy back on track, not the politicians. I have to agree." I agree too. I think people are going to start learning skills and such that it is either going to drive the cost of services down ... or the person/business will go out I agree. People are trading services. I agree. One thing that I love, that some communities have and I think it should be more wide spread, is a community garden. I agree. Everyone who wants to participate works in the garden and then, they get x amount of produce from the garden. Our community rents plots to citizens who pay for their plots with a little bit of money ($25, I think) and a minimum committment of time twice a year (less than a half day). The time goes to pulling mulch off, marking the plots with stakes and string and maintaning the picnic tables, rail fences, walkways, parking lots and such. In the fall, the time goes to cleaning up plots, putting mulch on, and maintaning stuff like in the spring. There is no organized community garden sales that I know of but there is a farmers' market a block away where people can sell things. The problem with doing it by requiring participation in the garden as a whole is that 20 percent of the people do 80 percent of the work (even if the other 80% of the people show up - and they mostly don't show up after the first few days without a lot a effort by someone and sometimes not even then. The 20 percent don't usually mind doing 40 or 60 percent of the work if they are doing the extra for the frail old lady or the mom with little babies who are doing what they are able to do but it is really irksome to do the work of the able people who spend 80% their time texting, leaning on their hoes, and watching the clouds. I think the American people should have more ownership of businesses and public establishments. I agree (or, actually, that many of our public establishments should be privatized by allowing private establishments to exist also - especially schools). What I mean is everyone pays a small fee (like part of taxes), but they have stake into a business preventing one or two people from owning something and charging astronomical prices and such. I don't agree. It is the sacrifice put into owning something that makes the thing valued. People take much better care of things they value. Besides, it doesn't prevent astronomical prices from being charged for two reasons. 1st, someone decides how much to charge... non-owners (or owners of tiny pieces) have a worse record than owners. 2nd, because when prices are set too low, the people providing the thing/service stop providing it. A better way is to keep the start up costs low so other people can start businesses that will also provide the thing/service when they charge less people can then pay less. If the prices are still too high, still other people will be attracted to starting another similar business. Start up costs include things like licensing requirements (including building permits for renovations or whatnot) and setting up business plans and so on as well as the actual costs of equipment and supplies. And have stable property laws and legal systems so people can know what the rules are before they decide whether or not to sink so much of their time and money into starting a business. Oh, and I also like how other countries have tougher immigration stipulations ... give jobs to their people first before immigrants are considered. I haven't decided what I think on all the ins and out of the immigration issue. On one point I have thought quite a lot about - I would rather see much tougher enforcement of much eased immigration stipulations. As in - let lots and lots and lots of people in but enforce that they come legally.
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