Jump to content
dudette10

dudette10

Registered User
advertisement

Activity Wall

  • dudette10 last visited:
  • 343

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 25,557

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

  1. dudette10

    What Would You Do?

    Just thinking out loud...if the patients are total care, it stands to reason that their lives have been extended due to our technologies. For those that were previously independent and are total care for the moment (trauma, post-op e.g CABG, etc.), they would most likely die within hours without continuing technology. For the ones who are chronic total care and in the hospital, they might be kept alive for longer through manual interventions, but it would just be delaying the inevitable. The scenario posed is the end of our lifestyles as we know it. Permanently. With a technology apocalypse, survival and self-preservation is priority. I will admit that all I wrote in the first paragraph is mere justification for my actions, to assuage my own guilt. But it's also very true in what would probably happen. I couldn't save these people, but I could save myself and my family. If I was the previously healthy person in that bed due to trauma or surgery, without a doubt, if I was able to express my wishes, I would want my nurse to euthanize me then go save her own loved ones. Otherwise, I would just die a slow, painful death anyway, even with her there.
  2. dudette10

    What Would You Do?

    It would take some time for people to realize what happened and that it is most likely a permanent thing. As soon as reality hit, I would steal a bike and get my ass home. There's no way I would want to be out in the open in the murder capital of the US for long. In such an extreme scenario--the ultimate scenario, really--it's survival of the fittest. However, there is a hospital about four blocks from my home. Depending on the stability of my family situation, I might check in there. I would also try to procure a gun from one of the cops that live near me.
  3. dudette10

    The worst decision I ever made.

    Thank you for this! We're in a position to pay for it out of pocket if not covered by insurance. I will talk to my oncologist about it!
  4. dudette10

    The worst decision I ever made.

    Thank you so much to both of you. Knotted, thank you also for sharing your struggles post-hyst. You are so right when you mentioned the daily struggles that well-meaning people don't fully understand. I can't blame them, of course. They are happy I beat cancer, and many of the post-hyst symptoms are just too intimate for polite conversation, ya know? It is incredibly helpful that you shared, as it makes me feel less alone. Herring, your suggestion of a support group is a good one. Maybe I will try...I'm one of those that looks warily on support groups for myself, but maybe it's time. i hope others that read this will share and not feel alone.
  5. dudette10

    The worst decision I ever made.

    A couple years ago, I was diagnosed with multi-centric IDC breast cancer, and, because of my family history, I was genetically tested, and I have the BRCA2 mutation. I had lumpectomy with sentinel node biopsy (clear), double mastectomy with immediate reconstruction, tissue expander exchange, and chemo. Having waited my entire life for the diagnosis due to my extensive family history, my attitude toward the diagnosis was, "Finally! Now, lets get this over with!" My husband said I treated that year of my life like I had a very bad cold. I was inpatient for less than 24 hours for the first 3 surgeries, and, while going through chemo, I didn't miss a day of work. My only disappointment was that I felt my boobs could have been a bit bigger (LOL) because I was barely an A-cup prior to my diagnosis, and part of my pectoral muscle on the affected side had to be removed for clean margins, so I have what I term "a crater," an indentation, at the top of the affected breast above the implant. Then came the suggestion that I have a total vaginal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy to reduce my risk of ovarian cancer due to my genetic mutation and risk of uterine cancer due to the carcinogenic properties of one of my chemo drugs. My female oncologist, who also has a genetic mutation, had already undergone her TVH-BSO by the time she had suggested it to me, and she made no mention of the side effects of the procedure. My period had stopped shortly after my first chemo infusion, and I was started on Tamoxifen after chemo ended. I had a few mild hot flashes, but that was really it. My energy level was good, and I didn't think much of the final surgery. Once my breasts had completely healed after an in-office reconstruction of my nipples through a simple flap procedure and tattooing of my aureolas, I thought, ok, ready for the TVH-BSO. Pit was the worst decision of my life. Because it was a vaginal removal, I felt great after the surgery, and I was discharged less than 24 hours after walking in as an outpatient. No bleeding, no pain, peeing fine, out I go. The trouble started--or at least I began noticing the trouble--about six months ago. I have gained 20 pounds in a year without a change in my eating habits or activity. My hot flashes are nearly debilitating. I have had patients look at me with concern as sweat drips off my forehead, and I attempt to laugh it off without giving information. In isolation rooms, it's even worse, and I sometimes feel lightheaded and like I'm on fire! I am on 800 IUs of vitamin E and extended release Lexapro for hot flashes. Every joint south of my waist screams when I get up in the morning and after getting up from a charting session at work. I have been diagnosed with chronic posterior tibial tendinitis and a talar dome lesion in my left ankle that prevents me from being able to do weight-bearing plantarflexion and running. I have to wear high tops and a sole insert while at work to keep from limping. I had a Dexascan, and I have osteopenia. My calcium levels are fine, but it's obviously being leached from my bones. We are struggling with getting my D3 levels up, and I am now on a once-a-week prescription for 50,000 IUs of ergocalciferol and daily calcium supplements. My vagina. Oh, my vagina, how you betray me! I took a look with a mirror, and I self-diagnosed with Dr. Google that I have vaginal vault prolapse. Because of the appearance--and despite the fact that I have one of the most loving and supportive husbands who was ever created and who is yearning for me--I refuse oral sex out of embarrassment. Speaking of sex....who needs it! I have no libido, no lubrication, and mild-to-moderate dyspareunia. Orgasms are difficult-to-impossible to achieve and more than one attempted lovemaking session has ended with me crying in my perfect husband's comforting arms. Emotionally, I have become a little distant, as my husband has told me with pleading, loving eyes. There are times where I daydream of a deserted island with a good book and an iPod or hope I am scheduled for work on the day of a planned get-together. Lets not talk about sneezing or coughing and peeing a little at the same time! I am fatigued. Fatigued beyond belief. Drag myself off the couch fatigued. Not sleepy, just achy-bone tired. It takes all my energy to do laundry in a 3-level house. What's more concerning is the more frequent palpitations and unexplained shortness of breath I feel. My kids say, "Mom, are you out of breath? Let me carry that for you." The ones I've been charged to protect are now protecting me. During my last oncology appointment, all I did was cry and talk about my post-hysterectomy symptoms. Because I can't have hormone replacement, there's really nothing more that can be done! Ok, I'm done. I am unashamedly writing this because I do need a pat on the back, a cyber-hug, and some practical advice. And I end this post with tears of frustration running down my face. Thank you in advance. Just thank you.
  6. dudette10

    Teen charged for having sex with same sex teen

    I'd also like to note that this situation is a crime in Florida, but not a crime in Georgia. Some states would consider it a misdemeanor, while other states consider it a felony. ETA: Based on other reports I've read, Hunt was arrested shortly after her 18th birthday, the parents of the younger girl knew about the relationship prior to that, and the younger girl is refusing to cooperate with authorities because she doesn't want Hunt prosecuted.
  7. dudette10

    Teen charged for having sex with same sex teen

    Even the law recognizes that consensual sex between two teenagers has special circumstances associated with it. While Hunt can still be convicted of stat rape, Florida has a so-called "Romeo and Juliet" law on the books that may not require her to register as a sex offender if convicted. This isn't all black and white, and even the law recognizes that.
  8. dudette10

    Do the writers of Season 4 of Nurse Jackie read this board?

    Oh, yeah, there's still the completely outrageous, like even thinking of leaving the floor for an hour to attend the ultrasound for O'Hara's baby. The advocacy though? There are times I wish we could do some of the things she does without getting fired. She had Chloe and Lenny go pick up the recently widowed and just-discharged father (from another hospital) of a daughter diagnosed with a subarachnoid hemorrhage who was refusing to go into surgery because of her worry over her dad. I loved that!
  9. dudette10

    Do the writers of Season 4 of Nurse Jackie read this board?

    Not everything, as poetic license makes for good TV, but elements in all episodes were spot on, especially the tension between the new DON and the nurses regarding his ideas.
  10. Every element of what frustrates nurses--and what we talk about here--is represented in this season. Corporate takeover, focus on profit, firing or demoting good, experienced nurses, understaffing, too much paperwork, etc. Either the writers read here or they have working nurses as consultants. It's eerie!
  11. dudette10

    I have cancer

    Good luck to you during this journey to recovery and survivorship! Think positively.
  12. dudette10

    Props to God, ignore the nurses

    I agree with your post (the bolded portion). Just because I'm an atheist does not mean I am anti-religion. For the record, my husband is a devout Christian of his own doctrine (but attends Catholic Mass), and he is in charge of the kids' catechism. To answer your question about how religion survives in a secular world in which most Western governments no longer have a stake in doctrine: The way that those in power use a tool is often different than the way those without power use it. It has evolved into a fulfilling spiritual lifestyle for many people, despite its political beginnings. I fear you are ignoring the current political and religious environment of some non Western countries/groups that continue to use their religions to enslave huge segments of their citizenry. Malala Yousafzai - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  13. dudette10

    Props to God, ignore the nurses

    It was always about political control and creating empires. What people were told was a way to make them fall in line to the then-current regime's way of thinking.
  14. dudette10

    Props to God, ignore the nurses

    As a recovering Catholic and current atheist, I have to respond to this. Yes, some people will interpret the Sacrament of Reconciliation as "just ask for forgiveness, and you're good to go." However, when I was a serious Catholic, I talked to priests during Reconciliation, and it is NOT meant to be that way. It is supposed to be a true Reconciliation (hence the name change from Confession to Reconciliation) with God, with yourself, with those you've wronged or hurt. It always annoyed me when people took Reconciliation extremely lightly and never grew from it. So many never did, but that was between them and their God. The funny thing is that the Sacrament of Reconciliation developed me more as a human being--even as a current atheist--than any other doctrine of my Catholic teachings.
  15. dudette10

    Props to God, ignore the nurses

    No, the "official statements" do not trump individual experience. Official statements are intellectual concepts that may or may not be practiced at the smaller community level. As an example, how do you explain the Catholic Church's support of worker rights through unionization when so many Catholic hospitals fight establishment of nursing unions tooth and nail? That's just one example, but it illustrates my point. ETA: An organization can say anything they want, but if it isn't followed through for the members of the organization, the word means absolutely nothing.
×