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Patti_RN

Patti_RN

RN
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  1. Patti_RN

    Is coffee creamer fattening?

    I have no idea how old you are, but sometimes people jump in weight in their late teens, or early twenties--others lose a few pounds during that period without trying. A third of a cup of any kind of creamer isn't going to be the best thing to consume--especially 4 times per day--think about it, that's over one cup of creamer each day!!! You might try gradually cutting back so it's easier to adjust to the different taste. I used to pour cream in my tea and never thought I'd switch to anything lighter. But, by first going to half and half, a few weeks later using whole milk, then 2%, then eventually I switched to skim milk in my tea. Sure, it's not like cream, but then again we don't eat chocolate cake for breakfast, either! Making changes in your diet will help your dad make changes in his. It's probably better not to have creamer in the house--or anything else 'off limits' for a person with HTN who just had an MI. Do him (and your mom and yourself) a favor and cut back on the butter, cream, red meats, etc. And go for walks together when he's able. Back to the question of your age... I'm assuming you're no more than 30 years old. That's very young to have cholesterol levels that are 'not great'. As you're probably aware, HTN and cholesterol problems can be familial, so developing good habits now will be to your advantage, later. Wouldn't it be great if chocolate and butter were health foods, and spinach and green beans were junk foods?
  2. Patti_RN

    Is coffee creamer fattening?

    Probably depends on how much creamer, and what type. Even if you use whole cream there are about 50 calories in a tablespoon. To gain one pound of body fat, you need to consume about 3,500 calories. So, that would be 70 cups of coffee with cream to gain a pound. Drinking two cups per day, you'd gain about a pound in a month. Unless you're drinking much more coffee than that, it's doubtful that it's simply the cream. Sweet tea may be the culprit. In a McDonald's large sweet tea (using that brand as an example) there are 230 calories. That's a LOT of sugar! Besides the calories, consuming massive amounts of sugar can lead to insulin resistance which can ultimately can lead to type 2 diabetes. You'd be better cutting back on both the cream and the sugar, not just for weight gain, but for the associated diseases fat and sugar can cause. Have you had your cholesterol levels checked?
  3. Patti_RN

    Maybe a hot topic.

    This is shocking! The original post was made two days ago, and more than a dozen NURSES responded, most saying that circumcision is a personal issue, and others saying it's not a medical decision. Not a single response spoke of the correlation between increased VD rates and lack of circumcision. We are patient educators whose knowledge should be current on basic health care issues. There are numerous studies correlating uncircumcised males with higher incidence of HPV in their female partners. Further, the CDC is considering a recommendation that all male infants be circumcised because doing so decreases the risk of contracting HIV via penile/vaginal intercourse--by 50%! Male Circumcision and Risk for HIV Transmission: Implications for the United States | Factsheets | CDC HIV/AIDS www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/hpv.pdf
  4. Patti_RN

    Adoption

    @Exit96, I'm sorry you were denied the opportunity to know your birth family, or know about them. Thankfully attitudes and opinions have changed in the last decades; many adoptions are open or semi-open. My daughter knows her birth family and it's been a blessing for her. She also feels that I am her 'real' mom, her dad is her 'real' dad and that her life is happy and settled. I wish you would have had that opportunity. But, I'm convinced that every birth mother loves her child enormously and selflessly--otherwise she wouldn't have made such a painful decision.
  5. @Herring! we should go surfing some day! If we can't pop up on the boards, we'll blame the oil in the sunscreen! It's amazing what people (especially women) in the name of beauty... uncomfortable shoes that cause foot deformaties, cosmetic surgery (no one I know looks 'younger'; some of them look 'rested', other people look 'stretched'), and some really bizarre gunk they smear on their faces (sheep plancenta? really?)
  6. Patti_RN

    Adoption

    I got your PM and tried to send a response, but it doesn't seem to be sent (it's not showing up in my 'sent' folder! Grrrr!) Send me another if you didn't get it.
  7. Patti_RN

    Adoption

    I respectfully disagree with JadeLPN. Adopted children know they are adopted and this fact weighs on their minds every day of their life. It's not just a curiosity, but it's a need to find one's origins and have the answers to questions thay plagued them for years: why did my birthmom make this decision? do I look like her? do I have birth siblings? Just like a birth mother who waits 18 years to finally meet her child, many birth children wait their entire childhoods in hopes that they will be contacted by their birth mother. The mother/ child role is never completely broken. Allowing another parent to care for your child is pure unselfishness. The original poster is well aware of putting her child first: she made the incredible sacrifice of allowing another mother to raise her child because she did put her child's needs ahead of her own desires. This was the ultimate act of love for a child she couldn't raise for her own very personal, very painful reasons. No birth mother gives a child for adoption without pain and anguish. When her child is 18 and she's (hopefully) able to be in contact, she'll give her child a second opportunity--the opportunity to meet her birth mother.
  8. Patti_RN

    Weight Loss

    First, your son will be proud of you no matter how much you weigh. Look at your accomplishments, and what you're planning on doing. You're working full time, raising your son, you were admitted to nursing school and you'll graduate before you know it. These are truly things to be proud of. Sadly, weight is one of the few personal problems people have that are evident to the rest of the world with just a glance. People smoke, they lie, they cheat, they gossip, they do all kinds of horrible things, yet no one walking down the street can see those faults, but they can see when a person is overweight and judge them. With all the emphasis on being thin more than half the US is obese. You're not alone. It's so difficult to lose weight when everything in stores, on TV, in restaurants, and at our friends' houses is laden with fats, sugars, and calories. When I was in nursing school an instructor told us that if a person walked at a fairly brisk pace, 15 minutes per day, every day they would lose from 5 to 10 pounds in a month. Being a skeptic, I did this, attempting to prove her wrong. At the end of the month, I had lost 14 pounds--happily, I was wrong! Much of our battles stem from lifestyle and lack of exercise. You might try buying a comfortable, supportive pair of walking/running shoes (New Balance makes great shoes--and you can wear them at clinicals, too!) Try walking every day; you'll find it's not only good for your heart and weight, but it's a great way to relieve the stresses of life (and nursing school!) Like DutchRN, I'm also a fan of Mark Bittman. He makes sense of the complicated issues of food by making it simple. Back in the days before food was controlled by industry we ate healthy, nutritious foods--homemade dinners, no corn sweetners, and actually very little sugar or refined flours. It may sound extreme or unrealistic or fanatical, but actually it's the way the world ate until a few decades ago--and obesity wasn't a major problem. Here's a video of him from Ted.com: Mark Bittman on what's wrong with what we eat | Video on TED.com Whatever you do, don't try fad diets or try to drastically cut your caloric consumption to an unhealthy level. You'll mess up your metabolism and make it even harder to lose weight. I noticed you have one star (stars are given based on the number of their posts on this board). I believe your account is restricted and you're unable to send or receive PMs until you've made a few more posts and get another star. When you've done this, PM me and I'll share some more thoughts, if you're so inclined. Good luck!
  9. Patti_RN

    Senator Schumer's plan to tax people who leave the US.

    Good advice, KnottedYarn! I'm outta here!
  10. Patti_RN

    Senator Schumer's plan to tax people who leave the US.

    He knew his potential exposure when he participated in the enterprise. If a person buys a lottery ticket, they know full well that winning and cashing it will expose them to income taxes. An investment has a floor but no ceiling, so it would not have cost him "everything he owned" But, I don't have the time or inclination to give investment lessons here. No one participates in the accumulation of others' wealth, but our society is entitled to taxes on that money. And, these are not 'earnings' they are capital gains. But, again, that's another lesson... I have never accused him of tax evasion, what he is doing is tax avoidance. If he chooses this route, Senator Schumer simply wants to remove the 'welcome mat'. Good riddence, Saverin.
  11. Patti_RN

    Senator Schumer's plan to tax people who leave the US.

    Let's make this simple. Saverin comes to the US to enjoy the freedom, education, safety,lifestyle, and potential for prosperity this country affords its citizens. You and I pay for these privileges in taxes and service to our country. Saverin becomes wealthy beyond measure. Instead of remaining, being appreciative of the advantages given by the American people, and paying a mere 15% on the accumulated wealth, he takes the drastic step to sever ties with the country and it's people. He moves his money to an off-shore account and does not pay taxes on the great wealth America enabled him to find. Instead of expressing outrage and anger some are actually defending this Saverin's actions.
  12. Patti_RN

    Senator Schumer's plan to tax people who leave the US.

    Saverin was a US citizen and resident when he contributed to the founding of Facebook. His basis was possibly a few thousand dollars; his ROC has not yet been fully realized. Capital gains are due when there is an event; he has sold some stock and his exposure was covered. Shedding stock in the future would expose him to future gains; he is proactively protecting himself from taxes on his ROC. This is a very simple, straightforward intent to reduce or eliminate future taxes on future gains.
  13. Patti_RN

    Senator Schumer's plan to tax people who leave the US.

    Wow. Three separate articles, one from the somewhat liberal side, one middle-of-the-road, and one a conservative voice, (and it happened they were the three top hits from my search--no need to spend countless hours sifting through propaganda to find supporting evidence). It's very convenient when a person wants to arbitrarily dismiss valid evidence when it doesn't support their unfounded theory. The simple fact is, people have the duty to pay taxes. Those taxes pay for basic services enjoyed by all Americans (and enjoyed by some immigrants like Saverin). The goal of taxation should be fairness, and the goal of providing services should be need based. Typically, people define 'fair' as "You should pay more; I should pay less". The irony in our country today is we have lower-income and middle-income people advocating for the super-rich, in essence saying, "I'll pay a much higher percentage of taxes so Bill Gates can protect his billions". And, I'll answer my own question about why a person would revoke their US citizenship: the reason this is done, in the great bulk of cases, is for tax avoidance. Revoking one's citizenship is a very grave, monumental, and drastic action. This is akin to disowning your child, abandoning your family, permanently disengaging from your mother, or a state seceding from the Union. This isn't a light-hearted, "I think I'll vacation in the south of France for a few months" kind of deal. Besides tax ramifications, people have threatened to revoke their citizenship over extreme and bitter political policy disagreements (especially when the US has a sympathetic position for a country at war with the person's family homeland). US citizens who have strong connections to either Israel or Arab countries have made rumblings about revoking their citizenship when the pendulum of US foreign policy swings to a position they do not support--but I don't know of cases where people have actually taken this step. By far, the most common reason people renounce citizenship is to avoid paying taxes--every other reason falls into a tiny minority. Using the analogy, above, if a person disowned their brother it is highly unlikely the brother would welcome them into his house some years later. So, Saverin takes his billions (of which he is avoiding paying his full share of taxes on) and hangs out in Singapore. It's unbelievable that any working class individual would support this and say, 'he's not paying his share, but he's paying enough...' When a person (like Saverin) takes this drastic pathway, he's effectively demanding a divorce from the country. And, the US should allow him back??? Saverin has unrealized investment gains; he may have paid taxes on the gains realized to date, but by renouncing his citizenship, moving his assets offshore, then selling his stock when he's no longer subject to US or Brazil's taxation. When else in the history of the world did commoners side with the privileged and defend the wealthy's rights to hoard gold, diamonds, and cash--when the direct consequence is that the poor and middle classes pay more taxes, receive less services, and are at an even greater financial disadvantage? Sure, go ahead and advocate for and subsidize the hedge fund managers, the CEOs of companies, and those who made a fortune on investments, surely they appreciate your efforts on their behalf.
  14. Patti_RN

    Surgery

    It's a terrible job market; the fact that she's over 50 probably doesn't help (but you can't sue every place you interviewed because you suspect you weren't hired because of unlawful discrimination). It sounds drastic, and incredibly invasive and painful to undergo all that surgery because you believe you'll be more employable after cosmetic surgery. The other danger (besides risk of infection, pain, and complications of surgery) is that 'tweaking' is one thing, but the extent of her surgery may result in her looking more like a caricature than a gracefully aging woman. She may be replacing the known (loose skin under her arms and slighly sagging breasts) with long red scars under her arms and rock-hard implants. Will her own kids even recognize her after all that? I've had friends who have had some minor cosmetic surgery and the results are very subtle and they look good (not 'younger' though... they still look their age, just, ah... 'well rested'). I've known of others who went the drastic route: one woman's smile is crooked, another has mis-shapen eyes, and another's lips look like she got punched. I'd catagorize their changes as 'hideous' rather than attractive. One friend was candid enough to admit that she's not pleased with the change, but she doesn't trust her original surgeon to fix her lips, and other docs won't do anything as they say it might make it worse.
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