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SuesquatchRN

SuesquatchRN

Registered User
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Posts by SuesquatchRN

 
  1. Ahhh...kudo wars. I've seen online communities where kudo options were recently added, and people's feelings were really hurt. Some admins even removed them because it just got out of hand.

    Ravelry has lots of buttons. "Disagree" has caused some amazing threads, boy!

  2. xtxrn, I "kudoed" your post because I agreed with it. And I wasn't targeting you or your comments. I went and found her threads and there's a lot of that. You are kind. Some are kind and starry-eyed. I also deliberately refrained from quoting you so that it would be clear that my response was not directed at you.

  3. Edited by SuesquatchRN

    Although I quite agree that a high level of asshattery was shown, notwithstanding the extenuating circumstances of the OP, it's also rather presumptuous to expect that everyone will refrain from posting something snarky prior to having thoroughly researched the poster. The wholehearted support of what is clearly an exceedingly unrealistic goal stymies me. Dreams are nice, but need we provide fodder for the impossible?

  4. Sorry, last thing...From Merriam-Webster, the definition of bully...

    3bully

    verb

    transitive verb

    1

    : to treat abusively

    Just sayin'.

    Yes, but is one snotty crack bullying? I think not. But we disagree.

  5. @Tait-I appreciate that someone volunteers to moderate this site, and there are a lot of posts, however, this is "all nurses" . CNA's, MA's, and student nurses are not at present, "nurses" (which has been argued as-nauseum on this forum -but I digress). Upon registration, if someone says they are not a registered nurse, then, let them look, but, please allow them to only post on the appropriate board.

    Just saying....

    May LPNs?

    I would not want to exclude anyone but I do agree that the starry-eyed stuff gets old, particularly as a lot of the moderation, IMO, is to keep everybody happy, which is simply not possible. As a result, we get a watered-down site geared to the least common denominator.

    The big thing for me, though, is the "new" format. It's just difficult to navigate with too many subfora, even (maybe especially) in Central. It's no longer possible to come in and just browse everything.

  6. What's wrong with Marinol? That it doesn't produce a "high"?

    At least for appetite improvement, Marinol is NOT as effective as straight old weed. There is speculation that THC is not the only cannabinol that stimulates appetite.

  7. what ticks me off is if you disagree with any of black folks allegations, it is automatically implied one is racist...

    whether it is blatant or not.

    I have never experienced that. I have met idiots, black and white, but never have I disagreed with someone black and been called racist for it.

  8. Sorry, but this statement is a racist statement. To say that, because someone is white, they do not have the same level of hardship that a black person has is ignorant.

    Nobody has said that. Individual experiences all vary. A Huxtable kid has advantages over the kid in Raising Hope. But the kid in Raising Hope is never going to pulled over for driving while black, and if you clean her up she will be perceived, at first glance, more positively than a similarly outfitted black kid.

  9. It points out both sides of being a man in nursing. To repeatedly insist that men in nursing are treated better than women is a discriminatory statement. How does it feel to be a bigot? :D

    Pretty good, actually! And I don't insist that men are treated better in nursing. They're treated better, period.

    :clown:

  10. Im not sure why this upsets you so much but you honestly need to open your mind a little more.

    If I open it too much my brains will fall out!

    And I am not upset, Shazoom, just a realist. There is a power balance in the world, and men are on top. Generally white men are on the tippity-top. Black women are pretty low on the social totem pole. It annoys me when people a) can't see their own privilege and b) tell those who are experiencing something that it does not, in essence, matter.

  11. Thank you for assuming im American friend, but im from Canada.... and a minority is still just that.

    Canada, then. Culturally far more similar than you probably care to admit. Certainly you sound like any number of defensive white men I know here.

  12. You have just put your foot in your mouth as I am a minority, but it has nothing to do with my skin color. Im a male nurse in a position dominated by women. Its good you can assume all nurses are female. I stand by what I wrote her, if you have negative thoughts towards your career because you would rather focus on skin color and not the merit of thoes around you, you have isolated yourself.

    *ahem*

    As a white male in nursing in the US you are a privileged minority. In just about anything else you are in the privileged majority.

    http://sap.mit.edu/content/pdf/male_privilege.pdf

    http://sap.mit.edu/content/pdf/male_privilege.pdf

  13. As a middle class white woman I can't say that I can identify with your feeling of isolation. The closest I can come is to remember visiting Egypt, where I stood out like the proverbial sore thumb.

    I will say that Blacks are under-represented in the sciences and there are probably many reasons behind that, not the least of which is what you are experiencing, which is people expecting you to be "less than." I'm sure it plays a role before advanced education as well, with Black and Hispanic kids being steered, probably largely unconsciously, towards less well-paying fields.

    Hold your head high and reach out, perhaps to the National Black Nurses Association. Certainly there must be something to what you are feeling else people would not have come together into their own group.

    http://www.nbna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=74&Itemid=133

    And best of luck to you.

  14. Hmmm... as with many issues, I don't think the extremes define the viewpoints. One could argue that there are euthanasia proponents who would like use the force of law to end the lives of those whom some might consider a drain on society or resources, or those who have no "quality of life," as defined by some faceless paper-pusher with no connection to the patient in question.

    Just my :twocents:

    I am not a faceless paper-pusher. I am a nurse who has watched people tortured by their adult children for various reasons, usually the child's own inability to come to terms with mortality, sometimes as venal as that as long as Daddy is alive they can live in his house.

    I could give that injection in the heartbeat it takes to stop his. I see so much needless suffering and prolongation of death, not extension of life.

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