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Presidential Election 2020

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You are reading page 66 of Presidential Election 2020. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

8 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

I'm surprised that you haven't heard them.  

Tax reform. UBI. Single payer health care.  Free public education. Employee chosen corporate board members.  Improved and expanded infrastructure.  

Those are a number of the "liberal" proposals which would serve to decrease income and wealth disparity.  I'm sure I could come up with a few more if I Googled it.  

So, redistribution of wealth is the liberal plan.

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1 hour ago, Lil Nel said:

I know you are well versed in how to use the Internet, so I will not insult you by spoon feeding you information.

Again, if you are TRULY interested in the problem, check out the platforms of Sanders and Warren.

If you are not TRULY interested, please continue the spin.

 

If you were to read my question closely, and Baloney missed this too, you would see I was asking which ideas YOU thought would fix income inequality.

Baloney tossed a few out there, but I’d really like someone to articulate how those things would fix income inequality.

 

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1 hour ago, SC_RNDude said:

So, redistribution of wealth is the liberal plan.

Sure. You are entitled to your opinion, which is clearly influenced by the GOP narrative seeking to describe such ideas in the most pessimistic and unflattering light.  

What is the conservative plan? Does it also include redistribution of wealth?

 

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1 hour ago, SC_RNDude said:

So, redistribution of wealth is the liberal plan.

The Trump tax scheme was a redistribution of wealth.

Did you think of it as a "Liberal" plan?

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28 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

Sure. You are entitled to your opinion, which is clearly influenced by the GOP narrative seeking to describe such ideas in the most pessimistic and unflattering light.  

What is the conservative plan? Does it also include redistribution of wealth?

 

“Those are a number of the "liberal" proposals which would serve to decrease income and wealth disparity”

Those are your words.  If youre decreasing the income of some to increase benefits for others, wealth redistribution seems like a great description.

 

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43 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

You are entitled to your opinion, which is clearly influenced by the GOP narrative seeking to describe such ideas in the most pessimistic and unflattering light.  

Sure, it’s the GOP narrative to describe things that way.  Like that the US is running concentration camps at the border?

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7 hours ago, SC_RNDude said:

What’s getting lost here is that unlike these other places mentioned, LA and SF have had decades of liberals implementing policies to “fix” these problems and have spent billions on social welfare programs.  In CA, almost a trillion $ in the last 25ish years.

A interesting opinion piece on the subject: https://www.manhattan-institute.org/html/why-liberal-california-poverty-capital-america-10882.html

Again, I've read one of the reasons is the high cost of housing.  That will raise the poverty rate.  

The state with the next highest poverty rate is Florida.  So conservative policies don't seem to help that much either.  

 

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55 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

What is the conservative plan? Does it also include redistribution of wealth?

 

Yes.  A good deal of the wealth has been redistributed under the current republican run government.  The difference between the Conservative and Liberal redistribution of wealth is the conservatives start at the top and the rich get the most benefit.  But they claim it will trickle down to benefit society as a whole.  If it doesn't it's still obey because taxing their hard earned money is akin to theft.

Edited by Tweety

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Just now, Tweety said:

opps sorry

 

Edited by Tweety

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On 6/17/2019 at 10:23 AM, SC_RNDude said:

Great point.  I would throw NYC in there too.

Not coincidentally, it’s difficult to think of a more liberal or progressive  oriented city over any of those four.

You should check out the documentary, “Seattle is Dying”.

Your argument is like saying hospitals obviously make people sick instead of treating illness because there are so many sick people in hospitals.

One of the main causes cited in "Seattle is Dying" for the surge in homelessness is that it's become known as a good place to go if your poor. 

There are two reasons for this, the first is that your chance of escaping poverty in Seattle and the other 'liberal' cities you've mentioned is 2 to 3 times better than in traditional republican strongholds.  I don't think helping people escape poverty is a goal worthy of criticism.  

The tricky part of programs that help people escape poverty is that they can be taken advantage of by those who have no desire to escape poverty and just want to take advantage of that system.  I would agree that preventing these people from abusing the system requires continuous vigilance to prevent this, but I don't think that even these liberal cities fail to recognize that.

My retired dad volunteers at a drop-in center for the poor and homeless, funded by the same programs you're suggesting are part of the problem.  It's very much the prototypical bleeding heart liberal sort of place, yet they have impressively little tolerance for those just looking to take advantage of the system.  People who need and want help, and who are looking to improve their situation have access to various forms of assistance, those who don't are prohibited from even going inside the drop-in center, there's certainly no coddling of those who aren't interested in bettering their situation.

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In the 1950s and 60s I worked many years for minimum wage. Most of those years I worked full time while going to school. 

Minimum wage was $1.25 an hour which was $50.00 a week before taxes. A single apartment in a nice neighborhood was $40 to $45 a month. I lived in a single when by myself. My Grandma and I shared a one bedroom University approved apartment that went for $50.00 a month. 

Frugal workers could save for and purchase a house earning minimum wage. Yes it was possible to barely support a family on $200 a month. Thrift shop clothing, household good, furniture and such had to be carefully chosen. No going to a restaurant or buying new items. People washed their hair with bar soap.  

Now minimum wage workers making 40 hours a week will soon earn $15.00 an hour. That comes to about $2,400.00 a month (or a little more depending on the month)

Rents start at $2,000.00 a month. Wages have not kept up with inflation. 

Quote

 

Americans in the top 1 percent average over 39 times more income than the bottom 90 percent. The nation’s top 0.1 percent and everyone else. Americans at this lofty level are taking in over 188 times the income of the bottom 90 percent.

https://inequality.org/facts/income-inequality/

 

I am a sustaining donor to this and a more local food bank. Although I've not met Mary I am glad to be helping her and others feed themselves, and their families.

The Los Angeles Regional Food Bank and LA Mission helped Mary get back on track There are so many stories about the devastating and growing issue of homelessness in Los Angeles County. For a variety of reasons, and sometimes through little or no fault of their own, homelessness is a reality for approximately 10 percent of clients served by the Food Bank.

Mary, for example, lost her job, her home and was unable to find new work because of health issues. “I was homeless for about a year, and I learned a lot,” she says. “It was scary, but you find that most homeless people aren’t really how people present them. They’re nice. They just have situations like everyone else.”

When she lost her home, Mary found the LA Mission. “Things are getting better. A lot better.” The LA Mission provides three meals a day, as well as programs to help get people back on their feet. The majority of the food they distribute through meals and other programs comes from the Food Bank.

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Here's an interesting article that speaks of poverty.  It sources the US Census as did the artel that named California #1 in poverty rates.  Mississippi is first on this list.  I wonder if it's a difference in calculations.

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/slideshows/states-with-the-highest-poverty-rates-in-the-us

Experts in this article below say Californias problem is housing.  Someone in SF making $100,000 would probably be poverty level. 

https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/opinion/the-conversation/sd-california-poverty-rate-20180913-htmlstory.html

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