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President Trump National Scandal

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You are reading page 106 of President Trump National Scandal. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Did President Trump-Pence administration drop the ball?

  1. 1. Did President Trump-Pence administration drop the ball?

    • Yes
      15
    • No
      2

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  • Poll closes on 03/02/2022 at 05:42 PM
1 hour ago, herring_RN said:

I met my husband at his restaurant on Fairfax in Hollywood where most residents were Jewish. This was the 1960s just a couple decades after WWII. I was blessed to hear the life stories of men and women whose entire families were killed by Nazis. One man who had  stationary store lost his parents, brothers and sisters, grandparents, and cousins. This man told jokes and smiled a lot. Many of the then Holocaust survivors in teir 40s and 50s were cheerful and friendly. When I walked my baby in her stroller I had old women stop to admire her and give advise. One would tell me, "Cover that baby up. She needs a blanket." The next would ask, "Why is that baby covered up? This is a warm day. If you are not cold she isn't either."  😀

At my first job as an LVN the full time charge nurse, and still my friend, was a child in a Japanese internment Camp. She remembered birthday parties, friends, and family. She said the adults kept kids from feeling trauma as the adults did.

It breaks my heart to read of Holocaust survivors dying from CVirus.

Too survive something so horrific, only to be felled by a virus, and an inept man's response to it.

So, sad.

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2 hours ago, herring_RN said:

I met my husband at his restaurant on Fairfax in Hollywood where most residents were Jewish. This was the 1960s just a couple decades after WWII. I was blessed to hear the life stories of men and women whose entire families were killed by Nazis. One man who had  stationary store lost his parents, brothers and sisters, grandparents, and cousins. This man told jokes and smiled a lot. Many of the then Holocaust survivors in teir 40s and 50s were cheerful and friendly. When I walked my baby in her stroller I had old women stop to admire her and give advise. One would tell me, "Cover that baby up. She needs a blanket." The next would ask, "Why is that baby covered up? This is a warm day. If you are not cold she isn't either."  😀

At my first job as an LVN the full time charge nurse, and still my friend, was a child in a Japanese internment Camp. She remembered birthday parties, friends, and family. She said the adults kept kids from feeling trauma as the adults did.

You so often put personal context to some of our most complex struggles.  Thank you.  It's a gift. 

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4 hours ago, Lucylu71 said:

I think it's a result of many factors.  Loss of income,  not being able to visit friends and family, losing your business you've worked so hard for decades, grieving the loss of the life you've enjoyed, etc.

Or, it could be what you mentioned in a earlier post.  Some people are just whiners and dont realize how good they have it compared to Anne Frank.

 

Yeah.

It sure does suck, not being able to visit friends and relatives.

I can relate to that.

And yes, I'm grieving my former life.

And gosh. In 2008, I lost my income, for YEARS, not months, and had to reinvent myself.

I think you are right.

Some people will whine no matter what!

 

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4 hours ago, Lucylu71 said:

I think it's a result of many factors.  Loss of income,  not being able to visit friends and family, losing your business you've worked so hard for decades, grieving the loss of the life you've enjoyed, etc.

Or, it could be what you mentioned in a earlier post.  Some people are just whiners and dont realize how good they have it compared to Anne Frank.

 

Seriously.

Maybe the folks whining about hair appointments and missed bar dates and restaurant food, should think about the sacrifices made by previous generations.

But that would take a certain amount of introspection.

I have already stated who I do feel very sorry for, and that is school kids.

Many of them are probably sliding backwards in their learning, and we can't have that.

We are currently living with the effects of the dumbing down of America, hence a subset of citizens like Trump, who can't understand science.

And so they illogically believe that wearing a mask, during a pandemic is violating THEIR civil liberties.

And then the subset, like Trump, who erroneously believe CVirus is no worse than the flu!

Yep. This nation can't afford any more dumb asses.

Edited by Lil Nel

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1 hour ago, toomuchbaloney said:

You so often put personal context to some of our most complex struggles.  Thank you.  It's a gift. 

Thank you. I posted about that restaurant years ago too:

https://allnurses-breakroom.com/the-economy-t93528/?do=findComment&comment=1104354

https://allnurses-breakroom.com/parents-teach-your-children-to-t88352/?do=findComment&comment=1039462

https://allnurses-breakroom.com/dont-cut-taxes-and-dont-t88522/?do=findComment&comment=1040054

 

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18 hours ago, Lucylu71 said:

Pretty much it seems from this discussion is that their concerns aren't valid because 1) they may be pro-Trump 2) there are only 600 of them which is less then the 2000 prosecutors who are concerned about a unrelated issue and 3) a pro -Trump poster is the one who brought it to this group's attention.

Based on the comments here, I dont think we do all agree on those things you mentioned.  Maybe we do and it's just hard for a select few to admit the have some agreement with a Trumpster.

As far as the "what happens when" questions.....what do you propose we do?  Wait for a cure or vaccine?

 

I have no disagreement with the Doctors' concerns, I dont think that generally there is any belief that these issues aren't adverse consequences of mitigating the transmission of a pandemic.  I also dont think there is much of any disagreement that we should alleviate these adverse consequences as soon as doing so results in more benefit than harm.

Where I disagree with the letter is the assumption that these adverse consequences aren't already part of the calculus that is guiding the reopening process that has already been underway.

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5 hours ago, Lucylu71 said:

I agree with everything you've said.

And yes, we need to make preventing the disease AND reducing suicide rates as well as some other solving some other problems.

This crisis is a worldwide multipronged problem.

I agree.  I don't think a "national shutdown" is the cause of suicides, driving while drunk or high, spousal and child abuse. I think you are likely correct that this is a worldwide multi-pronged problem that will require many of us doing what we can. 

This family clearly needs help and are asking for needed help. Hear the 5 minute

Parenting A Child With Autism During The Pandemic

Living with the pandemic has been difficult for everyone: the isolation, the need to wear protective gear like masks and gloves, the adjustment to working or learning from home.

For those living with or caring for someone with severe autism, those challenges can be exponentially more difficult.

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/05/22/861079758/he-s-incredibly-confused-parenting-a-child-with-autism-during-the-pandemic

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44 minutes ago, herring_RN said:

I agree.  I don't think a "national shutdown" is the cause of suicides, driving while drunk or high, spousal and child abuse. I think you are likely correct that this is a worldwide multi-pronged problem that will require many of us doing what we can. 

This family clearly needs help and are asking for needed help. Hear the 5 minute

Parenting A Child With Autism During The Pandemic

Living with the pandemic has been difficult for everyone: the isolation, the need to wear protective gear like masks and gloves, the adjustment to working or learning from home.

For those living with or caring for someone with severe autism, those challenges can be exponentially more difficult.

https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2020/05/22/861079758/he-s-incredibly-confused-parenting-a-child-with-autism-during-the-pandemic

I listened to that story, tonight in my car, herring.

That poor mother sounded like she was about to crack.

Her son has severe autism, and is non-verbal.

She is right about the caregivers in her son's life being essential workers.

I completely agreed with her.

It was a good piece.

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7 hours ago, Lucylu71 said:

I think it's a result of many factors.  Loss of income,  not being able to visit friends and family, losing your business you've worked so hard for decades, grieving the loss of the life you've enjoyed, etc.

Or, it could be what you mentioned in a earlier post.  Some people are just whiners and dont realize how good they have it compared to Anne Frank.

 

You should really check out 'You See The Best Of Us Now,' in today's WaPo, dude.

Twenty or so short essays, written by famous and non-famous, everybody from boutique owners to a fire fighter to a park ranger to teenager, telling what they are doing for themselves and others during the pandemic.

Not a whiner in the bunch!

I found it profoundly uplifting.

You might too.

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6 minutes ago, Lil Nel said:

You should really check out 'You See The Best Of Us Now,' in today's WaPo, dude.

Twenty or so short essays, written by famous and non-famous, everybody from boutique owners to a fire fighter to a park ranger to teenager, telling what they are doing for themselves and others during the pandemic.

Not a whiner in the bunch!

I found it profoundly uplifting.

You might too.

Im good.  I'm not the one who put out the idea that Americans are a bunch of whiners.

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22 minutes ago, Lil Nel said:

You should really check out 'You See The Best Of Us Now,' in today's WaPo, dude.

Twenty or so short essays, written by famous and non-famous, everybody from boutique owners to a fire fighter to a park ranger to teenager, telling what they are doing for themselves and others during the pandemic.

Not a whiner in the bunch!

I found it profoundly uplifting.

You might too.

I think this is well worth reading:

You See the Best of Us Now: What we are learning about ourselves and Each Other During the Pandemic

A staggering level of death. Multitudes out of work. The lives as we knew them so fully upended. But through the pandemic, many have found strength and taken comfort in family, friends, colleagues, neighbors, even strangers, including some for whom we have a new appreciation: grocery store clerks, truck drivers, warehouse workers.

What follows are voices from across North America that speak to a renewed sense of belief in the values that run through all our communities: stories of perseverance in these dark times and, perhaps most important, a sense of hope, which is the one medicine we can always rely on...

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/lifestyle/magazine/america-resilient-coronavirus-pandemic/

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4 minutes ago, herring_RN said:

I think this is well worth reading:

You See the Best of Us Now: What we are learning about ourselves and Each Other During the Pandemic

A staggering level of death. Multitudes out of work. The lives as we knew them so fully upended. But through the pandemic, many have found strength and taken comfort in family, friends, colleagues, neighbors, even strangers, including some for whom we have a new appreciation: grocery store clerks, truck drivers, warehouse workers.

What follows are voices from across North America that speak to a renewed sense of belief in the values that run through all our communities: stories of perseverance in these dark times and, perhaps most important, a sense of hope, which is the one medicine we can always rely on...

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/lifestyle/magazine/america-resilient-coronavirus-pandemic/

Thank you for posting, herring.

There are lessons to be learned from reading these essays.

 

 

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