Jump to content

President-elect Trump

Politics   (45,217 Views 192 Comments)
6 Followers; 99,341 Visitors; 15,979 Posts
If you find this topic helpful leave a comment.

You are reading page 4 of President-elect Trump. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Oh please, I am so tired of being called racist for not voting for Mr. Obama. His skin color had nothing to do with my decision not to vote for him.

However, since you have made this accusation, please be more specific in quantifying 'a great many.” Then, provide a source, other than opinion editorials or conjecture.

If racism was/is as rampant as you suggest, this should be easy.

The quote you posted did not call you a racist for not voting for Obama. It said a great many people are racist and therefore opposed him ... and that's true. Did you somehow miss birtherism and the countless racist memes that have been outed in the last eight years (suggesting that there were a great many more where that came from)? How about that West Va. twerp who called Mrs. Obama an "ape in heels" just this week?

It is easy to find more examples, as well as studies that examine perceptions and assumptions based on racial identity ... that you haven't seen them suggests that you haven't bothered to look.

I agree that disagreeing with progressive policy does not make you a racist. What struck me about your post is that you got your knickers all in a twist as soon as it was mentioned. I have no idea what your ethnic background is, but I have to point out that it's a feature of white privilege that we get to ignore racism and even pretend it doesn't exist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never mind ... dumb post :unsure:

Edited by heron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you didn't vote, then don't complain.

My wife brought to my attention the percentage of people who did not vote this election cycle. Actually, it's sad to know the percentage of people who do not vote for any election cycle. How does one motivate such numbers of individuals to participate in their. . . in OUR. . . governing process?!? I find this very frustrating. Also, I agree with the sentiment: "If you didn't vote, then don't complain."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My wife brought to my attention the percentage of people who did not vote this election cycle. Actually, it's sad to know the percentage of people who do not vote for any election cycle. How does one motivate such numbers of individuals to participate in their. . . in OUR. . . governing process?!? I find this very frustrating. Also, I agree with the sentiment: "If you didn't vote, then don't complain."

Well, as they say, elections have consequences. Perhaps dealing with those consequences will be the wake-up call. The state, local and mid-term elections will be interesting, for sure. If we even get to have mid-terms.

I haven't figured out yet if I'm watching the new Third Reich or the Weimar Republic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pence Takes Reins as Trump Transition Team Is Shuffled

Lobbyists are dropped; former Intelligence panel head Mike Rogers ousted

... Mr. Rogers was told he was being replaced because everyone who was brought in by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, the transition team's original chairman, was being ousted...

... The Trump transition team must now provide the Obama administration with the 'names of individuals they have authorized to represent the transition effort across the government,” Brandi Hoffine, a White House spokesperson said. They also must submit documents such as code of conduct forms that prohibit conflicts of interest. Once that paperwork is in place, the White House will give the Trump transition team briefing materials and they can begin working on location at various federal agencies...

... Rudy Giuliani, a leading candidate to lead the State Department, was targeted by Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul. The Republican senator, who has tried to block previous presidential appointments, criticized the former New York mayor for calling for the bombing of Iran in 2015. He also said he opposed former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton, who was also under consideration for the job...

... Mr. Giuliani is also drawing scrutiny for his regular appearances at events supporting an Iranian opposition group, called the Mujahedin-e Khalq, which the State Department designated as a terrorist organization from 1997 through 2012....

... Mr. Trump also on Tuesday appointed more than a dozen of his top donors and fundraisers to a committee charged with planning his inauguration ceremony in January.

The committee will be led by Thomas Barrack Jr., a real-estate investor who held Mr. Trump's first fundraiser in May and spoke at the GOP convention in Cleveland in July. The committee's finance vice-chairmen include billionaire casino owner Sheldon Adelson and his wife, Miriam, who gave millions of dollars to a pro-Trump super PAC in the final weeks of the campaign...

Pence Takes Reins as Trump Transition Team Is Shuffled - WSJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My wife brought to my attention the percentage of people who did not vote this election cycle. Actually, it's sad to know the percentage of people who do not vote for any election cycle. How does one motivate such numbers of individuals to participate in their. . . in OUR. . . governing process?!? I find this very frustrating. Also, I agree with the sentiment: "If you didn't vote, then don't complain."

After years of watching the different "Man on the Street" interviews . . . I'm glad people who are not interested in politics or totally uninformed about our country's history and/or politics do not vote.

And yes, if you didn't vote, then hush.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
After years of watching the different "Man on the Street" interviews . . . I'm glad people who are not interested in politics or totally uninformed about our country's history and/or politics do not vote.

And yes, if you didn't vote, then hush.

With regards to people not voting, there is a huge part of me that understands your position and really wants to agree with it. For example, take this election cycle. A significant number of people voted for our "President-to-be". Were those who voted for Trump - President Elect - ill-informed and mis-informed?!? Heck yes. Did they bother to research and learn past the rhetoric? Probably not. Were they UNINFORMED, and didn't bother to think past the rhetoric? Apparently so. Now, to be clear, I do NOT believe that all who voted for Trump - President Elect - are stupid, or bigots, or any of the negative stereo-types that can and have been applied to them. BUT, they voted. THAT'S for sure, which adds credence to your concern.

But here is why I fully do NOT agree with you.

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Take note of the first three words of the United States Constitution. It reads, "We the People". In fact, the entire preamble to our Constitution sets the tone for me to how we are governed and how we are to be governed, with the first three words being of utmost importance.

As free people and citizens of this nation, we all owe a whole lot of gratitude and debt to the different levels of government for the "things" that we enjoy throughout our daily lives. This includes broader concepts like freedom of speech to more mundane things like highways and public education. Being a well-informed citizen really isn't too much to ask, in my opinion. Of course, this requires a well-educated citizen, one who is not afraid to "question everything", and seek reliable information from different and reliable sources. So, I would argue to the positive benefits for our country in ensuring that its citizenry is offered the opportunity to be well-educated. (I'm channeling Bernie Sanders as I write this, by the way.) I do not believe that everybody can be an Einstein, nor to expect everyone wishing to be one. But our elected officials do influence our lives on almost every level of government. I believe this to be important especially holding the opinion that government is "We the People". This is most notable on the local level of government where many local laws and initiatives are made. Yet, in speaking for my small town, very few people actually vote when voting for their local representatives, and when voting for local initiatives are provided them. It's a shame! I've grown to believe that apathy is a disease of society. In my eyes, it's a potentially dangerous disease.

I don't have any answers to this. The only answer that I can think of, off the top of my head, is to make voting mandatory. But we do enjoy a certain level, and expect a certain level of freedom. The freedom to be un-involved and apathetic should probably be expected and respected. But for those people who are so inclined top be apathetic and uninvolved, expect concern and criticism, especially when important decisions are to be made. . . like the election of our next President, or whether or not we should be hiring (and financially managing) a localized Fire Department.

Edited by Ted

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about voting in communities and states where the rules keep changing and voter rolls are purged with little preventative oversight and polling places are closed in minority communities?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep remembering a mailer I got here in Albuquerque that stated that my neighbors would all know how I voted. I think that kind of threat, and some not so veiled, had an effect on turnout. How would one go about measuring such a thing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you support vouchers so kids can get the education they deserve and not one liberals think they deserve?

With regards to people not voting, there is a huge part of me that understands your position and really wants to agree with it. For example, take this election cycle. A significant number of people voted for our "President-to-be". Were those who voted for Trump - President Elect - ill-informed and mis-informed?!? Heck yes. Did they bother to research and learn past the rhetoric? Probably not. Were they UNINFORMED, and didn't bother to think past the rhetoric? Apparently so. Now, to be clear, I do NOT believe that all who voted for Trump - President Elect - are stupid, or bigots, or any of the negative stereo-types that can and have been applied to them. BUT, they voted. THAT'S for sure, which adds credence to your concern.

But here is why I fully do NOT agree with you.

Take note of the first three words of the United States Constitution. It reads, "We the People". In fact, the entire preamble to our Constitution sets the tone for me to how we are governed and how we are to be governed, with the first three words being of utmost importance.

As free people and citizens of this nation, we all owe a whole lot of gratitude and debt to the different levels of government for the "things" that we enjoy throughout our daily lives. This includes broader concepts like freedom of speech to more mundane things like highways and public education. Being a well-informed citizen really isn't too much to ask, in my opinion. Of course, this requires a well-educated citizen, one who is not afraid to "question everything", and seek reliable information from different and reliable sources. So, I would argue to the positive benefits for our country in ensuring that its citizenry is offered the opportunity to be well-educated. (I'm channeling Bernie Sanders as I write this, by the way.) I do not believe that everybody can be an Einstein, nor to expect everyone wishing to be one. But our elected officials do influence our lives on almost every level of government. I believe this to be important especially holding the opinion that government is "We the People". This is most notable on the local level of government where many local laws and initiatives are made. Yet, in speaking for my small town, very few people actually vote when voting for their local representatives, and when voting for local initiatives are provided them. It's a shame! I've grown to believe that apathy is a disease of society. In my eyes, it's a potentially dangerous disease.

I don't have any answers to this. The only answer that I can think of, off the top of my head, is to make voting mandatory. But we do enjoy a certain level, and expect a certain level of freedom. The freedom to be un-involved and apathetic should probably be expected and respected. But for those people who are so inclined top be apathetic and uninvolved, expect concern and criticism, especially when important decisions are to be made. . . like the election of our next President, or whether or not we should be hiring (and financially managing) a localized Fire Department.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So you support vouchers so kids can get the education they deserve and not one liberals think they deserve?

How on earth did you get that out of what Ted wrote??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How on earth did you get that out of what Ted wrote??

He didn't, really ... he just wants to keep us off the subject of voter suppression. Standard maneuver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×