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Nothing to do with anything (banned books)

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Oh, I agree that an elementary age kid shouldn't be reading this stuff, but after you pass up 16 years of age and can't read something like Harry Potter without your fragile little mind breaking...it just seems a bit ignorant to me. I realize it isn't true censorship, but many of the books I read in high school I might not have read at all if they weren't required reading (Huck Finn, Beowulf, Scarlet Letter.) And b/c of reading them, it opened me up to a few new genres that I am still enjoying today. I just can't see how well-rounded our kids are gonna be if we keep whittling down the books/activities they are "allowed" to do year after year until all they have left is "See Jane run. Run Jane. Jane runs fast." I just get all worked up over stuff. Think I'll go back to bed now. ZZZzzzzzz.

By the way, that sounds like a real cute book you've got there. I'll have to look it up. Thanks. :yeah:

Our first experience with Gary was "Hatchet" . . . . a really fascinating book because the author actually went out and tried to live in the wilderness and ate the things he made the young boy eat and tried to start a fire the way the young boy started a fire. My son gave it to all the adults in our family and even though it is a book written for kids - it kept our interest! Here's a link:

http://www.amazon.com/Hatchet-Gary-Paulsen/dp/0689826990

When the pilot of a small, two-person plane has a heart attack and dies, Brian has to crash land in the forest of a Canadian wilderness. He has little time to realize how alone he is, because he is so busy just trying to survive. And learning to survive, to plan on food not just for a day but until and if he is rescued, only begins when he stops pitying himself and understands that no one can help him. He is on his own, without his divorced father, whom he was to visit, or his mother, whom Brian saw kissing another man before the divorce. This is a heart-stopping story: it seems that at every moment Brian is forced to face a life-and-death decision, and every page makes readers wonder at the density of descriptive detail Paulsen has expertly woven together. Poetic texture and realistic events are combined to create something beyond adventure, a book that plunges readers into the cleft of the protagonist's experience. Ages 11-13.

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Wow. I love it when the author really does his/her research about the topic. Sounds like he went all out for his. Definitely gonna pick one up from Amazon. I have nieces/nephews that are big readers like me and it sounds like it would be right on target for them. Thanks Spidey!

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ALA | Banned Books Week

Interesting that when I went to the ALA site they were preparing to celebrate Banned Books Week in Sept. Thing is they are against banning books. They use this week to educate people about the need for open access to all reading materials. The list of books that others have tried to ban is humorous as well as pathetic. I won't add the list but it is fun to read the titles.

No, ALA is not banning books. They are pointing out the need to protect our 1st Amendment Rights and not ban any book.

If you want to read a Dr. Suess book that is adult as well as child reading material try The Butter Battle Book. Great book.

Ah, thanks so much for the info. Interesting site. I'm gonna bring some of that up to work with me. I don't remember which magazine the article we read was from, but perhaps it was trying to sensationalize things like the media tends to nowadays. Good to know the ALA isn't as asinine as I was presuming, though. Our school systems, notsomuch. I think people just focus too much on the one bad part about a book sometimes and never really give the whole thing a chance. When I was in high school, I remember thinking how stupid it was that they removed some books from the required reading for my Honors English class just b/c they had a couple of 4 letter words in them. C'mon, I was 18 and in an Honors class. If I can't handle the word that rhymes with "bam" by now, then I weep for my pitiful soul. They've said that word in cartoons for Pete's sake.

Neat book that you listed by the way.

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Reading this thread, I was reminded of the 1966 movie Fahrenheit 451, which is a screen version of Ray Bradbury's book of the same name. It also reminded me of the thousands of books burned in Nazi Germany in 1933.

Fascinating that parents are so concerned about their childrens' literary influences-remember the lunatic decision in the UK to ban Noddy?-yet I have to wonder what restrictions they place on TV, or newspapers and magazines?

Some of the tabloids read like cheesy soap operas; and speaking of soap operas, how many of these impressionable kids follow those as avidly as their own moms and aunts? What's being thrown at our kids through the media is frequently a damn sight more offensive than anything they're likely to read in any of those books!

One afternoon I saw a music video that was screened in between the kids' programs. It was a well-known artist singing his latest chart-topper; I like the number, and as an adult I thought the video was very well done, but it included a pretty graphic scene of simulated sex! In between KIDS CARTOONS?

If education in any country allows itself to dictated to by the biased and the ignorant, that country will eventually be run by the biased and the ignorant. The whole purpose of literary education is to encourage children to read about views, experiences and opinions that may differ from their own or their families, and to discuss them afterwards in a controlled, reasoned manner.

By the way, I googled "Banned books" before answering this thread, and interestingly enough I see that Fahrenheit 451 was banned in one of the US states in 1991...

Ha ha, I've just realized the Book Nazis would probably ban my post! :eek:! I used the word damn!!!

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Another thing... Wasn't there an attempt to ban Dr Seuss?

Btw, I read almost all the old Greek myths as a kid, and you don't get much saltier than those!

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