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Non compliant me

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I am a HONDA -hypertensive obese non- compliant diabetic (type 2) adult - and a retired RN. How do in find the motivation to get myself under control!!! I've seen the results of not adequately managing DM over and over and over again!!! HELP!!!

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Come to my Dialysis Clinic, and I'll show you where you will soon be spending your time!

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I hate the term noncompliance as a diabetic. I hate it, hate it, hate it! Have you read any Ginger Vieira? Have you seen her on YouTube? Are you a part of the diabetes online community (DOC)? Sometimes it's very helpful to hear you arent alone (diabetes can be lonely, especially when it's complicated by other stuff, like hypertension). Not being so alone is an amazing thing for a lot of people. Ginger's books and video's can really help make you feel empowered in your management.

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I am diabetic and I believe part of the reason people do not comply is they do not feel sick or in pain till MUCH later. If it hurt to have a BS of >300 you would fix it now. May be the same mind-set as addicts - just not worth it till it is worth it

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Classicdame, I could not agree with you more. The part they don't tell a lot of diabetics (especially type 2s) is that, as you regain control and come into range, a ton of diabetics who have been long term uncontrolled, feel very very sick. "False hypo" I've heard other diabetics refer to it as. My endo explained it in great terms for me once, telling me that the body protects itself in whatever way it can. It adapts to running hyper, then when you come down to normal numbers, you freak the whole body out. It gets confused. You feel hypo, and some people have worsened neuropathy symptoms. It passes, but it sucks. Another thing that happens is massive water retention. This can scare many away from control as well. It's kinda counterintuitive, but it can actually hurt worse physically to come in range than it does to be out of range for prolonged periods of time.

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Op, join tu diabetes online, or search You Know You're a Type 2 Diabetic When on Facebook. That's a wonderful supportive group of people. Also wearediabetes.org this page deals mainly with diabulimia, but Asha Brown is branching out to help all diabetics. Try diabetes sisters. That is an awesome organization. They have pods of diabetics who meet and encourage as well as conferences all over the US.

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Welcome to AN! The largest online nursing community!

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I have the metabolic syndrome, complete with type 2 diabetes. All my numbers are under good control with meds, but my diet is horrible and exercise is for other people. LOL. Finding the motivation to change 35 years of bad habits is an immense task, especially since people in my family generally live only into their late 60s and I'm not crazy about the idea of growing old in this culture. Why shouldn't I eat what I want?

Well, I do, but within reasonable limits. I'm lucky in a way, because my compulsive eating went away when I started on mood stabilizers and has never come back. I lost about 60 lbs. a couple of years ago, gained about 25 of them back thanks to one of my medications, but am now holding my own. I'm never going to be a size 14 again in this lifetime, and I'm OK with that. Gastric bypass is an impossibility due to no insurance, and my arthritis is severe enough that even walking hurts after a little while. So I do chair exercises, swim whenever I have the opportunity, and tend to my flowers.....that's about all I can do, but it's something.

 

Mostly, I've learned to go easy on myself because I'm doing the best I can, even though it may not seem like much to other people. Ironically, when I was beating myself up about my weight I had no control over my eating; now I just eat until the hunger goes away and don't eat when I'm not hungry. I know what my risks are, and yet I'm fairly healthy---my blood pressure is lower now than it was in my 30s and 40s, and my most recent A1C was 5.8.

The take-home lesson here is, you need to stop punishing yourself because you're unhealthy and unmotivated. The more pressure you put on yourself, the less likely you are to actually do something about it. You are caught in a vicious cycle and the only way to break it is to go against your instinct and start caring for yourself at least as kindly as you took care of your patients. Don't label yourself with negative terms (I HATE the term 'noncompliant'!!). Don't hate your body. It is merely a shell protecting your essence, and if it doesn't fit in with our culture's view of attractiveness, too bad. And if/when you DO find the motivation to diet and exercise, make sure you're doing it for you---not your doctor, not your family, and not to satisfy some impossible image of youth and beauty.

Most of all, remember: You are not alone.

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