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CrazyMommy CrazyMommy (New Member) New Member

Needlestick, HIV (+), breastfeeding

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OMG my world just fell apart 2 days ago. I drew blood and got pocked with a blunt needle, while transferring the blood into a vaccutainer. Filled out paperwork, went to lab, then to ER. They started me on the antiretroviral meds within 3 hours. They told I would not be able to breastfeed anymore. I cried! I asked many questions, if I could pump and dump and restart after the treatment. Dr didn't know called ID Dr and they found some info for exposed health worker and breastfeeding. I could restart 3 months after the finished dose. I felt so disconnected with my baby that day, but it is better (she is 3 1/2 months). I'm taking Emtriva, Viread and Isentress.

I've read the other posts here and I have hope. My husband is very helpful in keeping my spirit up, as well as my mom. I've received donor milk for my baby, and it breaks my heart to through the milk down the sink.

I'm having CBCs, CMPs every 2 weeks and a P24 level at 6 weeks.

I'm scared of the side effects, of not being able to work. I'm the only one working, husband will finish school this year. I work staffing pool part time, but full time hours, since it pays more, and school is not cheap.

So far, I felt a bit nauseated, and really tired. I'm on day #3 of meds.

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I'm so sorry this happened to you. :-( ((HUGS)) My heart really goes out to you.

Edited to add: can you see a counselor or someone to talk about your fears? It might help you to cope until the treatments are done.

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Thank you! Yes, I'm actually planning on seeing a psychologist!

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First of all, please make sure you continue working with your PCP, as we at AllNurses can not give medical advice per our Terms of Service.

The rate of transmission via needlestick is very low, but I know that is small comfort when you're on the wrong side of the needlestick. That's why it's important for you to work with your PCP. I agree with the PP: do consider seeing a therapist to help you process your feelings.

As far as the little one goes, having to suspend nursing does suck, but it's what you need to do. Talk to the La Leche League for advice on how to keep your milk supply going until the day you can hopefully resume breastfeeding.

Best of luck.

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Oh hon...((((Hugs))))! I almost got stuck the other day, while drawing an ABG from an uncooperative neuro pt. My first thought was not about the potential for HIV, but about breastfeeding (I'm breastfeeding my 5th baby and have been nursing for almost 8 of my 34 years). So I get where you're coming from! That quote "Whoever said 'don't cry over spilled milk' never had to pump" is so accurate.

If you haven't, I would encourage you to get in touch with an LC. She can give you ideas on boosting your supply should it take a hit from only pumping, or any other issues you have. When you're able to nurse again, if the baby is resistant try skin-to-skin! It's not just good for newborns. I used to know a lady who had all sorts of trouble nursing so decided to EP so her baby would have breast milk. Her baby was bottle fed for several months...I want to say 4 or 5 months, and one day it was really hot and she took a nap w/ her baby wearing only her skivvies. Baby started nursing, and she ended up nursing past the first birthday. Also, use the slowest flow nipples that you can get away with; I use newborn nipples until the baby starts to collapse them. This way she has to put some effort into getting the milk, like breastfeeding, and hopefully doesn't develop preference for bottles. The wide nipples seem to create a more natural latch b/c that's how the breast is shaped.

But I'd definitely plan to work with an LC in your situation. Your OB's office might be a good place to start for finding one. Or a La Leche League leader, if you have a chapter near you.

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Yes, I'm aware of the not giving Medical Advice. The symptoms I only wrote down, as I had read the other nurses severe side effects from day one. I'm hoping to keep this post going, for others to read, and especially for those that are breastfeeding.

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Thank you Here.I.Stand for all the info. I had contacted my Midwife, but will also get in contact with an LC, thanks. Oh, I didn't think about using the smallest nipple so baby can put more effort into getting milk. Will keep that in mind!

Pumped about 7 times today, oh boy, this is going to be a journey.

I wore her in my ring sling to get some closeness again!

I will keep this post going till the end.

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Hi - take a look at Dr. Thomas Hale's website and email him. I did this a few years back and he actually called me. He's an expert on breastfeeding and medications. We use his book "Medications and Mother's Milk" in post-partum.

Thomas W. Hale, Ph.D - iBreastfeeding.com

Best wishes!! I've had needle sticks too - in fact just had my last set of blood tests (at one year) and am so happy I can start donating blood again!

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Spidey's mom, thank you so much for the link, checking it out!

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My daughter used a mechanical pump and emptied both breasts at once. She said she felt like a cow on a milking machine, but it was pretty fast and quiet (she used it at work three or four times a day). Perhaps you could do that at the same time you feed the baby skin-to-skin, and keep your breasts on her schedule.

 

I hear you about pouring it down the sink. I had to do that for awhile because I had to take an antibiotic that had the remote possibility of creating aplastic anemia in the baby, and boy, did it **** me off. But we did what we had to do. Hardly comparable to your situation, I know...but the new normal happens anyway. This will end.

 

{{hugs}} As everyone has probably told you, the chances of transmission are very, very low, and once you're done c your drugs, all will be well. This too shall pass.

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Yes, I'm aware of the not giving Medical Advice. The symptoms I only wrote down, as I had read the other nurses severe side effects from day one. I'm hoping to keep this post going, for others to read, and especially for those that are breastfeeding.

That's what I figured...just have to do my job :)

If you're not already, definitely get a double-pump. I use one and it's made it possible for me to work and exclusively breastfeed--I can pump and be done in 10 minutes. They have some pretty powerful hospital-grade ones that you can rent so you can keep the milk supply going, especially if you're going to have to forego nursing for a long time. Otherwise (IMO) Medela is pretty much the gold standard for pumps.

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I know pumps can be very hard to clean because of all the tubing/small pieces and whatnot..just wanted to suggest replacing it or finding out from your PCP if all pieces can be cleaned or if they need to be replaced before using it again for baby. Hope everything works out for you!

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