Latest Comments by pmabraham

pmabraham, BSN, RN 43,558 Views

Joined: Jan 27, '13; Posts: 2,598 (41% Liked) ; Likes: 2,315
Registered Nurse; from US
Specialty: 2 year(s) of experience

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    10 to 15 patients with time periods where it may go up just prior to a new nurse being hired.

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    Sheyi1 and CrochetNurse154 like this.

    If their pain is being properly managed, just reposition as you would a non-hospice-patient.

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    It's going to vary based on the agency. At our agency, we are paid at our hourly rate with overtime over 40 hours per week.

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    • An educational project to educate families that demand a full code concerning the actual torture it puts terminally ill patients through.
    • An educational project as to the benefits of hospice and palliative care especially answering such questions as to why hospice, why now?
    • An in-service educational project to educate the providers, social workers, case managers, etc. on the various floors of the hospital where you work as to the benefits of palliative service and hospice, and why providers, social workers, and case managers should be advocating for hospice sooner than later.

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    JacAn001 likes this.

    Good day:

    Barbara Karnes, RN has a number of pamphlets that are very informative; my favorite is "Gone from my Sight: The Dying Experience." Keys to hospice: patience with the patient, family, and friends; symptom management with the goal to provide comfort.

    Thank you.

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    JacAn001, ponymom, and nuangel1 like this.

    I'm also new to hospice (started April of this year), and the nurse I was replacing made it a point to tell me to set boundaries between home life and work. Sometimes it is hard to say, "no," but we have to take care of us before we can take care of our patients.

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    brownbook likes this.

    Hello "a very sad young RN."

    An RN license provides a lot of flexibility if you are willing to do your homework and experiment. Some people think hospital or nursing homes are the only way to go, but then there's home health, hospice, and other choices.

    I've found that hospice provides a lot of work-life balance without a lot of the pressures I felt at the hospital working with UNSAFE patient ratios on a regular basis. Consider your options, do some homework, and don't feel stuck.

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    Kitiger likes this.

    The hard part is when a family member who is the caregiver doesn't want the patient to know they have a terminal illness or even for us to mention we are from so and so hospice agency.

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    Unless things have changed, Pennsylvania is fast during the early part of the business week. So you should see your results within 24 to 48 hours after taking your boards.

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    Hello:

    "What area of nursing do you work in?" doesn't have an answer selection for Hospice and therefore I cannot complete the survey.

    Thank you.

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    Which system do you use? Thank you.

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    rn1965 likes this.

    Hello. I'm sorry you are going through this experience. I guess the lessons learned include reading the label so there are no assumptions (we do this when we are pulling meds correct?) and making sure to clear our work area when we are done. Questions that might be asked of you (at interviews or before a board etc) is how does one go through an entire shift drinking out of a bottle without reading the label or even just the name on the bottle that might have given clues the bottle contained alcohol. I do hope you receive mercy so that you can continue to practice as a nurse, but I also hope lessons take hold (read the bottle, read the label, don't consume anything you are not 100% sure of what's in it and don't leave garbage including left overs et all at work).

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    brownbook and Kitiger like this.

    Thank you OP for posting this story. As a hospice RN, I've seen death far more than when I worked on a floor where most patients were stable or otherwise ended up in the ICU and because of HIPAA never found out if they made it or not. I'm not sure how I would feel about a pediatric patient passing under my care; it's hard enough when they are a few years younger than me or around my age.

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    Marmaladey likes this.

    Hello. I left my first job, hospital-based because the unit manager was discriminating against me. Family first especially if the employer doesn't give a hoot and you are just a warm body/license holder. Also, keep in mind management can lie through their teeth about ratios, about how they will resolve an un-safe ratio situation, etc.


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