Jump to content

Media behaving badly

Politics   (76,447 Views 865 Comments)
18,372 Visitors; 2,281 Posts
If you find this topic helpful leave a comment.

You are reading page 64 of Media behaving badly. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

11 hours ago, MoondoggieRN said:

As a side note,  today at work on a online trading module regarding being more sensitive to LBGQT issues, I learned “homosexual” is a outdated term and shouldn’t be used.  I also learned Q is for queer, a term that I thought WAS offensive.

Dint know how we’re supposed to keep up on what is and isn’t offensive anymore (just in general, not specifically lbgqt).

Yes.

Most people understand that language evolves and changes, as societies evolve and change.

So, while I thought most of those modules were a waste of time, I guess they are useful to some!

The words Negro, African-American and Black, have also evolved.

In many instances, groups, who have been assigned "terms," have now decided for themselves, how they want to be referred to.

It is all about defining yourself, and not allowing others to decide who you are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, MoondoggieRN said:

As a side note,  today at work on a online trading module regarding being more sensitive to LBGQT issues, I learned “homosexual” is a outdated term and shouldn’t be used.  I also learned Q is for queer, a term that I thought WAS offensive.

Dint know how we’re supposed to keep up on what is and isn’t offensive anymore (just in general, not specifically lbgqt).

Are you about to go one of those "everything is so politically correct these days and everyone is offended by something all the time" rants?

I am a homosexual and haven't heard that homosexual wasn't supposed to be used.  But I am 60 and out of the mainstream, but who knew?

However, I knew way back in the 90's with the advent of things like "Queer Nation" and mainstream TV shows like "Queer as Folk"  "Queer Eye For the Straight Guy" that queer was being embraced by the gay community.  

It does get a bit crazy nowadays with the advent of the idea that people are now genderless, non-binary, questioning, and all sorts of things.   You have to sometimes ask "what pronoun do you prefer to be called he, she or they?".   I personally like "queer community" to embrace it all, but others aren't there. 

Edited by Tweety

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not all all unusual for groups of people who have been marginalized or abused with words to begin to take ownership of those words and in the process, force discussion. It wasn't very effective for black men to publicly call white men crackers or other names, but it seems that society changed when they embraced the term N!&&€¿ and their art and culture put that term in the middle of everyday life. 

NIGGER The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, toomuchbaloney said:

It is not all all unusual for groups of people who have been marginalized or abused with words to begin to take ownership of those words and in the process, force discussion. It wasn't very effective for black men to publicly call white men crackers or other names, but it seems that society changed when they embraced the term N!&&€¿ and their art and culture put that term in the middle of everyday life. 

NIGGER The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word

Many of us still have problems with the N word. And many of us dislike being called Indians instead of Natives. My family looks like United Nations so I'm familiar with many problematic terms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, NurseBlaq said:

Many of us still have problems with the N word. And many of us dislike being called Indians instead of Natives. My family looks like United Nations so I'm familiar with many problematic terms.

Most of white America should have a problem with the N word.

I live in wonder at how differently Alaska natives are treated within our justice system. Isaw it first hand this spring.  It is curious to me that America has intentionally harmed indigenous people and then refused to acknowledge the incredible stress of life style disruption, family separation, forced relocations, etc on those cultures and communities.  Policing and judgemental governing further disadvantage the population while the white leadership blames every measure of their current situation on the "choices" of the natives. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, toomuchbaloney said:

Most of white America should have a problem with the N word.

I live in wonder at how differently Alaska natives are treated within our justice system. Isaw it first hand this spring.  It is curious to me that America has intentionally harmed indigenous people and then refused to acknowledge the incredible stress of life style disruption, family separation, forced relocations, etc on those cultures and communities.  Policing and judgemental governing further disadvantage the population while the white leadership blames every measure of their current situation on the "choices" of the natives. 

Indeed. Not only that, US government have broken numerous treaties with Native tribes. They make agreements, then break them whenever it suits them. Then roll out cameras and act like the Natives are upset for no reason and make a big production out of it when, in reality, they've done something to set them off. We saw this with the land stealing for their pipeline. Aren't there enough pipelines? There are people, Native or not, sick all over the country due to poor government accountability of natural resources/habitats. Just about all of NC is poisoned due to Duke and their coal ash ponds. Many cancer clusters resulted from that. North Alabama and 3M intentionally dumping their toxic chemicals in the TN river and local ponds. Poisoned the lands. Fukishima still leaking, not the US fault but still problematic for the world and US.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, NurseBlaq said:

Indeed. Not only that, US government have broken numerous treaties with Native tribes. They make agreements, then break them whenever it suits them. Then roll out cameras and act like the Natives are upset for no reason and make a big production out of it when, in reality, they've done something to set them off. We saw this with the land stealing for their pipeline. Aren't there enough pipelines? There are people, Native or not, sick all over the country due to poor government accountability of natural resources/habitats. Just about all of NC is poisoned due to Duke and their coal ash ponds. Many cancer clusters resulted from that. North Alabama and 3M intentionally dumping their toxic chemicals in the TN river and local ponds. Poisoned the lands. Fukishima still leaking, not the US fault but still problematic for the world and US.

Like yours my family has people of different races including Oklahoma Cherokee. Every summer from age five to thirteen my sisters, cousins, and I got to attend summer Bible camp on the "Five Civilized Tribes" reservation where my aunt's mother was born and raised until her marriage to my aunt's father. 

There on the porch of my aunt's cousin's house I got to listen to old ladies recite the story of the "Trail of Tears". They spoke that history as it had been passed down. For example a woman said, "We didn't recognize the medicine plants we knew how to use. We had to learn the uses of these different one in Oklahoma." She was born decades after the Trail Of Tears, but spoke as if she had been there.

Most of my family are Black, White, or mixed. I am not native American like my cousins whose grandmother was Cherokee. but we all are glad to have learned the Indian Lore we learned at camp and from our older family members. When my aunt, at age 90, had cancer and was in hospice her six adult kids and nieces (like me) took turns as her caregiver. I flew back, rented a car, and had a wonderful time with just her. Because she had six kids I only remember one other time I got to be with her and just me, That was when I helped her hang clothes on the line. Sometimes we talked, other times we sang "So Long It's Been Good to Know You", or "Amazing Grace" in Cherokee.  

Quote

For centuries, treaties have defined the relationship between many Native American nations and the U.S. More than 370 ratified treaties have helped the U.S. expand its territory and led to many broken promises made to American Indians.

https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/01/18/368559990/broken-promises-on-display-at-native-american-treaties-exhibit

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, herring_RN said:

Like yours my family has people of different races including Oklahoma Cherokee. Every summer from age five to thirteen my sisters, cousins, and I got to attend summer Bible camp on the "Five Civilized Tribes" reservation where my aunt's mother was born and raised until her marriage to my aunt's father. 

There on the porch of my aunt's cousin's house I got to listen to old ladies recite the story of the "Trail of Tears". They spoke that history as it had been passed down. For example a woman said, "We didn't recognize the medicine plants we knew how to use. We had to learn the uses of these different one in Oklahoma." She was born decades after the Trail Of Tears, but spoke as if she had been there.

Most of my family are Black, White, or mixed. I am not native American like my cousins whose grandmother was Cherokee. but we all are glad to have learned the Indian Lore we learned at camp and from our older family members. When my aunt, at age 90, had cancer and was in hospice her six adult kids and nieces (like me) took turns as her caregiver. I flew back, rented a car, and had a wonderful time with just her. Because she had six kids I only remember one other time I got to be with her and just me, That was when I helped her hang clothes on the line. Sometimes we talked, other times we sang "So Long It's Been Good to Know You", or "Amazing Grace" in Cherokee.  

 

My granny and great-granny had home remedies for everything! I was raised by my granny who just recently passed away and my big mama (great-granny) passed away in my late 20s so I had the benefit of both. They started teaching my children, too. They also taught us the family history. My granny sent me all her photo albums and wrote names/dates on what she could remember before she passed away. I've been trying to restore them but I'm doing it slowly because I don't want to lose/damage anything. 

I told my children to hold on to that because not everyone gets the benefit of grandparents, let alone great-grandparents. I have a pic of my daughter, my granny, and great-granny together on a family outing. One of the best pics in my house! 4 generations on one pic is super priceless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, NurseBlaq said:

My granny and great-granny had home remedies for everything! I was raised by my granny who just recently passed away and my big mama (great-granny) passed away in my late 20s so I had the benefit of both. They started teaching my children, too. They also taught us the family history. My granny sent me all her photo albums and wrote names/dates on what she could remember before she passed away. I've been trying to restore them but I'm doing it slowly because I don't want to lose/damage anything. 

I told my children to hold on to that because not everyone gets the benefit of grandparents, let alone great-grandparents. I have a pic of my daughter, my granny, and great-granny together on a family outing. One of the best pics in my house! 4 generations on one pic is super priceless.

Wait, my math off, that's 5 generations. 😂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, NurseBlaq said:

Wait, my math off, that's 5 generations. 😂

We have a picture of my Mom's mother with her three adult children, thirteen grandchildren, and the twelve great grand kids born at the time. She died before the youngest was born.  Four generations in that family picture. 

I hope you will want to visit the "Daily Diary" threads. We often talk about family, food, chores, and other friendly topics.

You click "clubs" and then under that click "Daily Diary".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, herring_RN said:

We have a picture of my Mom's mother with her three adult children, thirteen grandchildren, and the twelve great grand kids born at the time. She died before the youngest was born.  Four generations in that family picture. 

I hope you will want to visit the "Daily Diary" threads. We often talk about family, food, chores, and other friendly topics.

You click "clubs" and then under that click "Daily Diary".

That's great! Make plenty copies and cherish those for future generations.

I'll check it out.

Edited by NurseBlaq

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2019 at 5:48 AM, SC_RNDude said:

This thread is long overdue.  I won’t go too far in the past as I’m sure there’ll be plenty of material in the future.

It looks like Nick Sandmann of the “Covington Kids” May be gearing up for a lawsuit.  I don’t know how strong a case he would have legally speaking, but I sure would like to see those involved in smearing him pay for it bigly.

https://www.newsweek.com/lawyers-nick-sandmann-50-letters-media-organizations-celebrities-1316113

A video by his attorneys that show a bigger perspective of the incident then what most of us saw.

 

Quote
Quote

 in Judge William Bertelsen’s ruling, the judge concluded that “Sandmann’s allegation attempts to insert innuendo not found within … the publication,” and that his claims were “not supported by the plain language in the article, which states none of these things.” (Bertelsen extended this analysis of one of the Post’s articles to the remainder of the pieces and Tweets which were included in Sandmann’s lawsuit.)

They will appeal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×