Climate Change: Coming to your hospital soon - page 4

Climate change is reawakening germs that have been dormant for years. As nurses, we may not need to take Microbiology again, but we should be cognizant of how the environment affects us and impacts... Read More

  1. by   Tracy0924
    Thank you for posting this thoughtful article. Just when I thought the Baby Boomers were the most promising reason to start a nursing career now, along came climate change to make it even shinier. Thanks, EPA.
  2. by   heron
    Quote from Tracy0924
    Thank you for posting this thoughtful article. Just when I thought the Baby Boomers were the most promising reason to start a nursing career now, along came climate change to make it even shinier. Thanks, EPA.
    You're blaming the EPA for climate change? Really?
  3. by   toomuchbaloney
    Quote from heron
    You're blaming the EPA for climate change? Really?
    yep

    Privatized profits and socialized clean up costs. That's the business model of mining and fossil fuel industry problems. They bank on the fact that their messes ate public health issues so there is incentive to get it cleaned up. They drag out cleanup for years, until the public will pay just to get it done.

    didn't you know that if an old mine site full of poison and pollution is breached and runs into a river that the EPA is fully responsible, there is no blame for the capitalists who took the money and left the mess.
  4. by   chare
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    [...]
    didn't you know that if an old mine site full of poison and pollution is breached and runs into a river that the EPA is fully responsible, there is no blame for the capitalists who took the money and left the mess.
    If you're referring to the 2015 Gold King Mine spill, the EPA is responsible for the cleanup as they were responsible for creating the spill.
  5. by   heron
    Quote from chare
    If you're referring to the 2015 Gold King Mine spill, the EPA is responsible for the cleanup as they were responsible for creating the spill.
    Who was responsible for creating the pollutants in the first place?

    TMB is spot on about the basic business plan of the extractive industries: private profits, public clean-up. Textbook cost-shifting.

    I'm no big fan of the EPA, decades of subversion have pretty much pulled whatever teeth they ever had. The current administration is just finishing the job of turning them into the joke that private industry always wanted them to be.

    But blaming them for pollution created by private industry, because they fumbled the clean-up, is just too disingenuous for words.
    Last edit by heron on Nov 22
  6. by   chare
    Quote from heron
    Who was responsible for creating the pollutants in the first place?
    [...]
    This I agree with. Whoever was responsible for creating the hazard should be responsible for cleaning it up. And it is my understanding that they are held accountable. I am unsure as to how, or why, the EPA became responsible for cleaning that site.
  7. by   heron
    Quote from chare
    This I agree with. Whoever was responsible for creating the hazard should be responsible for cleaning it up. And it is my understanding that they are held accountable. I am unsure as to how, or why, the EPA became responsible for cleaning that site.
    I haven't researched that particular incident particularly carefully, but a quick search shows that the EPA became involved at the request of the state (Colorado).
  8. by   chare
    Quote from heron
    [...]
    But blaming them for pollution created by private industry, because they fumbled the cleanup, is just too disingenuous for words.
    I'm not blaming the EPA for the pollution. The EPA had been working with Environmental Restoration LLC, a contracted private cleanup crew at the Gold King Mine to mitigate a leak into Cement Creek. While the cleanup crew on site was attempting to install drainage pipes the containment wall was breached, allowing the spill into the Animas River. After the incident, the EPA accepted responsibility, although I'm unsure why, exactly as I've read conflicting reports as to whether it was EPA personnel, or employees of Environmental Restoration. If tha latter, it would seem that they should be responsible.

    This is an ongoing problem with many abandoned gold mines in Colorado, with either active or potential leaching of hazardous materials. The EPA nominated this site for superfund designation during the early 1990s, without success. Apparently there was a lack of community support, which might have contributed. Had this site been designated as a superfund site funds might have been available earlier.
  9. by   toomuchbaloney
    Superfund sites are an example of socialized clean up costs, right?

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