Brief biographies of those killed at their churches Bible study last evening

  1. The Victims: 9 Were Slain At Charleston's Emanuel AME Church

    The group of six women and three men had come together for a weekly Bible study meeting. The man who is suspected of killing them is now in police custody.
    The victims are: (Read the link to find out about them)

    The Victims: 9 Were Slain At Charleston's Emanuel AME Church - capradio.org
    This hurts me. My cousin, just ten months younger than me, attend Bible study at our former church in Oklahoma every Wednesday.

    It is again time to remember to tell our loved ones how much we love them, thank them, and hug our friends and loved ones. (Except those ho don't like hugs. I just called a dear nurse I know who doesn't hug and told her how I appreciated working with and learning from her.)
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    About herring_RN Guide

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    56 Comments

  3. by   Farawyn
    This sickens me. This kid wanted to start a Civil War? Apparently he was raving for awhile, but no one took him seriously.
  4. by   heron
    Or maybe some did take him seriously and agreed with him.
  5. by   rnsrgr8t
    This hurts my heart so much.... I go to church every Sunday...have attended Wednesday Bible studies in the past. The elderly women who were killed remind me so much of the elders at my Mom's church. Everytime I go to see my parents, I am greeted with open arms by these women and I love them. I do not know how anyone could have sat with these amazing people for an hour, listened to them pray and pray for HIM, welcome him with open arms and then murder them all in cold blood.

    The response of the community in Charleston humbles me....if I that happened in my church and community, I know my anger would have gotten the best of me. These horrific, racist, evil acts were committed and these people did not riot, lash out or anything...they all came together in church and prayed.

    We all need to hug and appreciate our families and communities. That is the only way we are going to overcome evil like this.

    Heart is so heavy today. Prayers for them all.
  6. by   heron
    Anyone here read People of the Lie by M. Scott Peck? A Christian psychiatrist, this book looks at his experience of real evil in his practice, as distinct from illness. These are people who do harm, cause damage, betray friendships and generally promote badness, for no other reason than that they want to. They like it. He tells a story in the book that I can't get out of my mind and I can't decide if the similarity is merely superficial, or has a deeper relevance.

    The story concerns a young man he was treating after a suicide attempt. It turns out that his older brother had committed suicide years earlier. Apparently, his parents thought it a good idea to give the young man the gun with which his brother shot himself, as a present, on the birthday when he turned the same age as his brother was at the time he died. Peck reports that the parents insisted they had no clue the kid was at risk for what he did, which was to shoot himself with his brother's gun.

    What in the Mother's name are we doing to ourselves?
  7. by   toomuchbaloney
    I believe we are embracing anger and violence and celebrating greed while calling ourselves a Christian nation.

    We are not hearing the rhetoric that these people might not have died but for the political life of the pastor and his failure to allow his congregants to carry weapons in the church sanctuary to protect themselves.
  8. by   Jules A
    Just tragic and once again as someone working in mental health I can't help but wonder how the heck family can't or won't recognize illness of this magnitude and do something. Regardless of whether he has an Axis I diagnosis or is just antisocial not addressing drug abuse and hatred in a young person would be unacceptable in my family. By ignoring the signs they have in effect allowed him to ruin his life as well as the lives of so many innocent strangers.
  9. by   heron
    deleted ... changed my mind and decided I need to think about it some more.
  10. by   ElvishDNP
    I read this today and it was exactly what I needed to read. These are missionaries who have lived in Africa for 20+ years.

    A thousand people smarter than me will analyze what went wrong. Centuries of injustice of the most horrific sort, kidnapping people, buying them, selling them, trafficking them across oceans, treating them as expendable means of production, as subhuman beings to be exploited. Centuries of enriching ourselves at the expense of others, and justifying it with indefensible laws. Centuries of emphasizing difference, building barriers. Then another century of denying the sins of our fathers and ourselves, thinking we could somehow move on, that it would all go away. Only it didn't. Educational and economic gaps still glare; the tension is still ready to boil at any flashpoint. Baltimore and Ferguson and McKinney and now, Charleston.

    Why does someone like Dylann feel justified in walking into a church and shooting people who, but for a bit of melanin in their skin, could be his mother? I think the bottom line in hate-crimes is fear. Fear that the other type of person will get something I need, fear that my type of people won't be OK. Fear based on scarcity, fear that my survival is threatened by the others. Fear that this is a zero-sum universe, and that the equation may not add up favorably for my group.

    In Africa, we call that tribalism. Kenya's neighbor breeds that fear, sending young men the same age as Dylann (but more lethally armed) into churches and universities to kill. In Burundi, the decades of mistrust, violence, suspicion between two groups of people are torpedoing efforts to establish democracy. In South Sudan, the newest country in the world is disintegrating as its diverse groups grab for land and power and wealth, ready to kill their supposed competitors. In Uganda, a simmering conflict between the two main language-groups of people where we work heats up, last summer triggering numerous deaths. These are all the places we work, and every single one is as unstable as Charleston.
    ParadoxUganda: Ever since Cain
  11. by   herring_RN
    Families of Charleston 9 forgive shooting suspect in court

    They forgave him. They advised him to repent for his sins, and asked for God's mercy on his soul. One even told Dylann Storm Roof to repent and confess, and "you'll be OK."...

    "I forgive you, my family forgives you," said Anthony Thompson. "We would like you to take this opportunity to repent. ... Do that and you'll be better off than you are right now."

    Roof, who faces nine counts of murder, was ordered held on $1 million bond on a separate gun charge. He appeared by video from the county jail, looking sombre in a striped jumpsuit and speaking only briefly in response to the judge's questions.

    A police affidavit released Friday accused Roof of shooting all nine victims multiple times, and making a "racially inflammatory statement" as he stood over an unnamed witness.

    Felecia Sanders survived the Wednesday night attack by pretending to be dead, but lost her son Tywanza. She also spoke from the judge's courtroom, where Roof's image appeared on a television screen.

    "We welcomed you Wednesday night in our Bible study with open arms. You have killed some of the most beautifulest people that I know. Every fiber in my body hurts ... and I'll never be the same," Sanders told Roof.

    "Tywanza was my hero," Sanders said, but even she showed some kindness as she confronted the man accused of killing her son: "As we said in Bible Study, we enjoyed you but may God have mercy on you."

    Roof, 21, bowed his head slightly as the relatives spoke. From the jail, he could hear the people talking, but couldn't see them, because the camera shows only the judge...

    Families of Charleston 9 forgive shooting suspect in court

  12. by   toomuchbaloney
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    I believe we are embracing anger and violence and celebrating greed while calling ourselves a Christian nation.

    We are not hearing the rhetoric that these people might not have died but for the political life of the pastor and his failure to allow his congregants to carry weapons in the church sanctuary to protect themselves.
    Should read "we are NOW hearing the rhetoric..."
    twitter was alive with comments from NRA spokespeople.
    Last edit by toomuchbaloney on Jun 19, '15 : Reason: it's Friday, isn't it?
  13. by   herring_RN
    An NRA board member blamed the pastor killed in Charleston for the deaths of his members

    An NRA board member blamed the pastor killed in Charleston for the deaths of his members - The Washington Post
  14. by   toomuchbaloney
    18 Anti-Gay Groups and Their Propaganda | Southern Poverty Law Center

    While considering that religious groups promote intolerant and discriminatory behavior against gays we should remember that violent crimes are carried out against LGBT citizens even today.

    Even Wikipedia can provide a generic history and current events listing of crimes against gays in the USA.

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