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Le-Lee_FNP Le-Lee_FNP (New Member) New Member

I refuse to be a fat nurse!!

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You are reading page 3 of I refuse to be a fat nurse!!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Yup, your title was offensive. As a nurse who is fighting with her own endocrine system (Grave's and quite possibly Cushing's, waiting on official diagnosis), I must step up and say sometimes weight gain is through absolute NO fault of the person doing the gaining.

I'm fortunate that my gain is minimal compared to some, but not everyone has my "luck"

Colleen I am very sorry to hear about your endocrine problem and I am very empathetic to those who struggle with weight issues for medical reasons. I was in no way implying that someone in your situation is lazy or doesn't care about their health. I am frustrated with those who simply don't care about being healthy and instead of supporting those who want to make a change, they try to make them feel as they are weird for doing it. I strictly referring to those who chose an unhealthy lifestyle and have no motivation to change even though as nurses we should be setting an example. Don't get me wrong, I know its tough as i have struggled myself in the past. Its just weird to me that the workplace filled with healthcare professionals would be the toughest place to stay healthy due to the stress, constant promotion of unhealthy eating, and lack of motivation from co-workers to make any changes. Again i'm very sorry if I offended you and I sincerely hope things turn around for you healthwise.

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sorry if the title is offensive. but i just wanted to share my struggles with weight gain since becoming a nurse. i have been a nurse for 5 years but i began gaining weight when i started nursing school. i told myself i didn't have time to workout because i was too busy studying, and i told myself i couldn't afford to eat healthy.

when i graduated and got my first nursing job, my weight issues continued. i was so stressed out about being a new nurse and not knowing what i was doing that again i turned to food for comfort. then i started working nights and really packed on the pounds. co-workers were constantly snacking and bringing in food and again i told myself i couldn't work out because the nights made me too tired.

here is my frustration. as a nurse i feel like it is my job to promote a healthy lifestyle to my patients and how can i do this if i am not practicing what i preach? i recently decided to make a commitment to lose the weight and maintain a healthy lifestyle with appropriate food choices and working out. i am telling myself that i can do this despite the temptations at work, the stress, of my job, and working 12 hour night shifts. but it is really tough. i want to know if there are others of you who are experiencing the same thing?

also for those of you who do maintain a healthy lifestyle what are some of the things you do to avoid temptation, eat healthy, and exercise regularly despite being tired and constantly tempted with bad food in the workplace?

first of all, let me commend you for striving to better yourself mentally & physically. having said that, i'm a body-builder and it has taken years for me to condition my system not to crave all of those temptations that our patients bring on a daily basis. needless to say, declining politely all of the great cooking that some of the nurses and other staff share with us on any given holiday or special occasion. unquestionably, i'm also tempted in many ways to rail off my path of healthy snacking etc. with that said, i bring my own lunch to work and most of the time i eat in my office, it helps to stay on track. in addition, i'm also a zumba instructor and i teach the zumba classes several times a week. therefore, besides my bodybuilding, zumba, and swimming, when i have an incredible urge to binge on high carbohydrates or sugar, i keep sugarless gum at all times with me it keeps my mouth busy. furthermore, another trick is wherever i go to have a meal, i always first drink a large glass of water then i'm not able to finish everything in my plate :cool: wishing you the very best always... aloha~

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first of all, let me commend you for striving to better yourself mentally & physically. having said that, i'm a body-builder and it has taken years for me to condition my system not to crave all of those temptations that our patients bring on a daily basis. needless to say, declining politely all of the great cooking that some of the nurses and other staff share with us on any given holiday or special occasion. unquestionably, i'm also tempted in many ways to rail off my path of healthy snacking etc. with that said, i bring my own lunch to work and most of the time i eat in my office, it helps to stay on track. in addition, i'm also a zumba instructor and i teach the zumba classes several times a week. therefore, besides my bodybuilding, zumba, and swimming, when i have an incredible urge to binge on high carbohydrates or sugar, i keep sugarless gum at all times with me it keeps my mouth busy. furthermore, another trick is wherever i go to have a meal, i always first drink a large glass of water then i'm not able to finish everything in my plate :cool: wishing you the very best always... aloha~

gitanorn, thank you so much for your encouraging words. you know, i definately see the benefits of drinking lots of water before you eat and i have attempted to implement this on my off days. but as someone mentioned earlier, it is really tough to drink water while working because there often isn't enough time to pee lol. but i hear ya. i will have to do the best i can.

luckily i will be a nurse practitioner soon and i plan to get a job that will allow me enough time to at least eat lunch, stay hydrated and pee when i need to. and no more nights either! i can't wait.

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Watching what you eat will help some, but working nights might be responsible for most of your weight gain. When your daily schedule runs counter to circadian rhythms, you produce much more cortisol than normal, a hormone strongly associated with weight gain, plus your metabolism is stunted, and your melatonin production is lower, both of which also contribute to weight gain. When I first started working nights, I was actually eating much less than normal, yet I still gained weight. I found that minimizing the effects of working nights helped much more than diet.

MunoRN, I agree wholeheartedly. I can't remember the last time i have gotten over 5 hours of sleep since working nights and i know that is horrible for weight loss. Unfortunately i am stuck working nights until i finish NP school because i can't afford to take the pay cut of going to days, plus I have clinicals during week days :(

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I don't think your title was offensive, perhaps some people just took it that way due to all the recent threads about discrimination against overweight nurses. I took the title as it was ment, you are fighting to be healthy, for your patients but also for you. Lead by example, when others ask you how you do it your passion for your lifestyle change will show through in your voice and perhaps it will help lead others to find their way.

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good for you and not being a fat nurse

WE KNOW BETTEr

all the candy sugar treats every shift omg

I actually lost twenty of the 36 pounds I gained in nursing school due to studying and stress but not eating more all that sitting reading

I REFUSE TO BE A DIABETIC!!!

90 percent of my patients are on insulin shots OMG!! its eye opening and crazy when there is no good reason for this

Diabetis runs in my family both sides and I run slightly resistant even when I am a size 5

I REFUSE to stick my finger and take shots

so I have no problem turning down all the bad foods what so ever

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Glad to hear that your efforts are paying off. FWIW, my workplace is pretty darned healthy. Sugary treats tend to sit around our back room 24-48 hours without a noticeable dent in the quantity.

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No disrespect to the OP, but I want to do a slight thread hijack here.

I don't think your title was offensive, perhaps some people just took it that way due to all the recent threads about discrimination against overweight nurses. I took the title as it was ment, you are fighting to be healthy, for your patients but also for you. Lead by example, when others ask you how you do it your passion for your lifestyle change will show through in your voice and perhaps it will help lead others to find their way.

Discrimination against overweight nurses: Perhaps you can expect MORE of it, if management concludes that fashion-plate nurses get better patient reviews.

I was just on a discussion board a few days ago (not nursing or heathcare related), and a woman who'd been a patient at a hospital was doing some huge carping about how having a fat and short of breath nurse there gave her a bad experience as a patient, because this nurse obviously "wasn't healthy" herself but was out there giving all these patients advice and orders, yada, yada, and probably wasn't even competent as a nurse, because she wasn't following her own advice. Then several other people chimed in with essentially the same sentiments: Receiving health care from fat or morbidly obese nurses (and no doctors were ever mentioned in the 3-page thread) offended them, or seemed hypocritical in some way, or was seen as detrimental to the hospital's image, i.e., nurses who are themselves "unhealthy" can't provide competent care.

I was steaming. I fired up Biatch Engineer and and I took out every bit of my RN school dissatisfactions on them. I told them exactly what to do with their preferences, and that nurses are hired to do specific job duties, and that it should be sufficient that they show up and do their jobs well. And (pardon me) nursing is a job that has a lot of drawbacks to it, and demanding that nurses be perfect role models and physically attractive, when that is *not part of the job description*, is just an unreasonable demand made by patients, and so far as I am concerned, all such patients can just go home disappointed. I did, however, qualify my opinion, saying that I am no longer in RN school and I don't intend to pursue a career nursing, because the working conditions are brutal, and inmates are allowed to run the asylum.

Seriously. I think it's past high time that a few patients get a steel-toed boot in the pants instead of more placating. Ignorant and/or indigent patients should NOT be allowed to affect a RN's performance ratings or financial compensation.

(rant mode off)

But watch for those biases in the patients to start being new stumbling blocks for you.

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