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KonichiwaRN KonichiwaRN (Member) Nurse

I guess this is another fake deal by Trump?

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52 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

Taxpayer funded HIV research

When corporations partner with tax payers we don't generally have these type problems. It's not always a smooth or even process but this is unprecedented. 

"U.S. government, which patented the treatment in 2015, is not receiving a penny for that use of the drug from Gilead Sciences Inc., Truvada’s maker, which racked up $3 billion in Truvada sales last year. (LA times, 2019)."

 

"1997 Scientists from Gilead and UC San Francisco show that tenofovir treats HIV. The drug must be given intravenously..July 1997 Gilead slightly modifies the drug to create tenofovir disoproxil, or TDF, which can be given as a pill. Regulators approve the medicine in Oct. 2001. Its last patent expires in 2018. (LA Times, 2016)."

 

So the question is, which drug is which? Obviously, both 1997 & 2001 is way before the CDC patent which set in 2015.

 

You cannot dispute that Truvada has been "researched" initially, by Gilead from the year of 1997. Way before the CDC patents.

Edited by KonichiwaRN

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6 hours ago, KonichiwaRN said:

    "1986 A Czech Republic scientist files for a U.S. patent on tenofovir.

1997 Scientists from Gilead and UC San Francisco show that tenofovir treats HIV. The drug must be given intravenously.

July 1997 Gilead slightly modifies the drug to create tenofovir disoproxil, or TDF, which can be given as a pill. Regulators approve the medicine in Oct. 2001. Its last patent expires in 2018.

April 2001 Working to reduce the drug's side effects, Gilead scientists publish research on a different chemical version of the medicine called tenofovir alafenamide, or TAF.

April 2002 Gilead pays doctors to test TAF in HIV patients, including in Los Angeles. The positive results aren't published until 2014.

Oct. 2004 Gilead announces it has stopped research on TAF. The company, however, continues to apply for patents to protect TAF.

May 2005 Gilead's partner, a Japanese company, files for a patent on a combination pill that includes TAF and other HIV medicines.

Dec. 2010 A Gilead executive tells investors about "an interesting new molecule" the company has added to its research plans. The molecule is TAF.

Nov. 2015 The FDA approves TAF in combination with three other HIV medicines. The last patent on the new pill Genvoya expires in 2032.

March, April 2016 The FDA approves two additional TAF-based combination pills: Odefsey and Descovy. Gilead sales reps urge doctors to switch patients to the new drugs, saying they are less toxic to the kidneys and bones (LA Times, 2016)"

 

https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-gilead-timeline-20160527-snap-story.html

 

 

Taxpayers? Wow. Where do you see, Taxpayers funding the "research" of Truvada? Links please?

Truvada is a two-drug combination of previously existing drugs, emtricitabine and tenofovir.  Emtricitabine was developed by the CDC at Emory University in 1996 and licensed to a company that Gilead took over in 2003.  Gilead was involved in tenofovir earlier than that but still didn't initially R&D the drug.

In the US, drugs themselves aren't really patented, it's their indication that is patented, and the patent for HIV prevention using the two drug combination of tenofovir and emtricitabine is owned by the CDC.  Gilead has been ignoring the patent under the argument that is basically, 'what are you going to do about it'.

An HIV treatment cost taxpayers millions.  The government patented it. But a Pharma giant is making Billions.  

The gist of the reporting:

“…[Researchers’] work — almost fully funded by U.S. taxpayers — created a new use for an older prescription drug called Truvada: preventing HIV infection. But the U.S. government, which patented the treatment in 2015, is not receiving a penny for that use of the drug from Gilead Sciences, ­Truvada’s maker, which earned $3 billion in Truvada sales last year. Gilead argues that the government’s patents for Truvada for PrEP, as the prevention treatment is called, are invalid. And the government has failed to reach a deal for royalties or other concessions from the company… The extraordinary standoff between the CDC and a drug company over patent rights raises a big question for the Trump administration: How aggressively should the government attempt to enforce its patents against an industry partner? … Activists want the government to take a more aggressive stance against Gilead. Their complaints are part of a broader wave of anger over drug companies reaping hefty financial rewards by capitalizing on taxpayer-funded research…” (Rowland, 3/26).

 

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On 5/13/2019 at 11:34 AM, KonichiwaRN said:

We have choices. LOTS of choices when it comes to:

Food, Health Care, and Energy.

 True.

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2 hours ago, Leader25 said:

 True.

 

True only for some, not for all. "We" don't all have lots of choices when it comes to food, health care and energy. Not by a long shot and this is intertwined with income and wealth disparity.

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On 5/13/2019 at 8:34 AM, KonichiwaRN said:

Do we have bread lines here in this nation like the U.S.S.R where one product is offered? Well, unless you're Bernie Sanders who thinks it's a good thing: "Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) in 1985 praised countries where people "line up for food," calling breadlines a "good thing (Washington Beacon, 2019)."

https://freebeacon.com/politics/sanders-breadlines-are-a-good-thing/

We have choices. LOTS of choices when it comes to:

Food, Health Care, and Energy.

Quote

2 hours ago, Leader25 said:

 True.

 That quote was misleading.

In 1985 Bernie Sanders said, ""You know, it's funny, sometimes American journalists talk about how bad a country is because people are lining up for food," Sanders said. "That's a good thing. In other countries people don't line up for food. The rich get the food, and the poor starve to death."

https://freebeacon.com/politics/sanders-breadlines-are-a-good-thing/

 

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