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Homeschool curriculum?

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You are reading page 4 of Homeschool curriculum?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

After raising 3 kids through the teen years I have to say that Junior High might be a good time to homeschool :coollook:. . ..... I felt like I tossed them to the lions.

Here's just one issue - Meanspirited, backstabbing, dramatic behavior from the girls . . .. :cool:

steph

Edited by Spidey's mom

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The socialization thing is largely a sterotype, and often a very inaccurate one at that.

We have coop that meets on Fri for art, pe and other gatherings. Dd has girl scouts and golf lessons on Thursdays. Her bff who is a public school child nearly lives with us on the weekends.........

Now there are those who choose to sequester their children. There are people who are odd, they exist in both ends of the spectrum.

What I know is that ultimately only I am solely interested in my child succeeding as an individual. The school system at best is only looking for succesion as a group and there is little to no room for individualality

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Hi....researching ahead of time is a good idea ;)

We weeded thur alot of choices before we figured out what worked for us..

My daughter is 8 and my son is 3 Time4Learning They have a 2 week money back gurantee so if your wanting to research it id go ahead and try it now and see what you think ..That way you will know if its a possible option or to mark it off your list ...just an idea ;)

Keri

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I was homeschooled K-12. My Mom had my sister and I on Seton Home Study School. It's not very science heavy (although I understand that it has gotten much better) and is very intense. I felt well-prepared for a college workload when I got there.

Seton has a special needs program as well as the tougher program and will tailor things to your needs while providing you a definite curriculum.

http://www.setonhome.org/

It was awesome. Anything could become a field trip and school days were done at our convenience. Socialization wasn't really a problem too -- if your kid is involved in sports, Church, whatever, school can be worked around it. I'll always thank my Mom for her great sacrifice in homeschooling me.

My Mom works for Seton now as an advisor to people interested in homeschooling, so if you need someone to talk to about Seton, let me know. I can try and get you connected. ;)

I don't know much about other programs. A lot of people make their own programs, but I think Seton is one of the few accredited ones out there.

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a lack of socialization in the early yrs, can cause irreparable harm.

but teaching a child right from wrong (tickle tongues, f-word) doesn't seem as drastic.

besides, we can't protect our children from negative events for the rest of their lives.

leslie

Socialization is only a problem if the parents don't actively get their kids involved in other kids. My Mom used to kick my sister and I outside to play with other kids if it was nice out and tell us to play. No excuses. :lol2: Earlier than that, she used to get together with friends that had kids and that allowed her to socialize while allowing us to socialize too. Swimming lessons, library trips... granted, we lived on an AFB where there were perhaps more socialization opportunities, but I believe that home schooling kids doesn't necessarily cause a lack of socialization.

Here's opinion, once more -- no kids myself -- but I think that while you can't protect kids from negative events all their lives, forming them to have a good foundation, a strong belief system to carry them through those negative events is very important.

I never felt deprived of a social life and if I ever felt socially awkward, it was more b/c I grew up with an older sister who had Aspberger Syndrome than b/c I didn't know how to socialize. I can definitely say I like who I am and who home schooling made me. I can probably never thank my Mom and Dad enough for making that choice. :redbeathe

It was also awesome b/c, in high school, it allowed me to work almost full time as a CNA even during the school year. I loved having a readily adjustable schedule! Kinda like nursing, actually. :yeah:

Definitely not judging people who choose not to home school, but I figured that I might provide a different perspective on this topic. Don't know how many k-12 home schooled nurses we have on here.

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Thanks Franciscangypsy - you bring a unique perspective here - a child who was homeschooled K-12 and lived to tell the tale. ;)

I have very good SDA friends who did the same thing with their children. They were part of the group my kids and I did things with like skiing and camping, etc. They live in Hawaii now - and all the kids surf instead of snow ski! :D

In fact in thinking about it I have many friends who homeschooled their kids K-12.

Here's the thing that sorta forced me into putting my kids into the local Junior High School - sports. My boys LOVED football and wanted to play on the high school team. My daughter loved softball and wanted to play on the high school team.

In some communities, private school and home schooled kids are allowed to play on the local high school teams and we went before the school board to ask if it was possible here - the #1 problem is we are a very small and poor school district and they really wanted the $$$ from enrolling our kids in school. Understandable . .but frustrating.

Our kids begged - and we relented. I wish we had waited until 9th grade though - we moved them into public school in 7th and 8th grade - the meanest years of all.

I do heartily agree with you and babynurselsa that the socialization issue is largely a myth - and has been debunked by research.

Of course there are always exceptions to the rule . . .but that doesn't mean you can't home school and raise a perfectly normal child.

I guess those of us who did home school have had to live with the socialization issue for so long that it strikes a cord in us.

Again - thanks for writing.

steph

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I was home schooled from First Grade, until Freshman year of High School.

Pound him with math, math, math, and sciences. Biology, chemistry, etc. even if the levels seem "beyond him" you'd be truly amazed what a child can learn.

English composition and Grammar, and Math, from 1+1 etc. all the way up to Algebra and Trigonometry. And pound in the sciences. Human Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry, (even Bio-Chemistry) etc. grind it into him. A lot of text books are self explanatory. Since you're a Nurse, you can help him understand certain things.

Just don't get into political stuff. Let him develop his own view of politics. That said, don't baby him, or "coddle him" from the rest of the world. Let him explore.

At age 15 when I had entered High School. I left High School with a Washington State Certificate of Academic Achievement. As well as several Principal Honors Awards, etc. etc. And I only attened a grand total of 5 years in the public school system. Trust me on this, his brain can handle all that.

Also, a very large barrier you're going to have to find a way around, is the socialization issue. If there is a boys and girls club etc. even a community church or whatever, let him go to those kinds of places, even to just socialize and meet people his own age.

Home school is incredibly lonely. You have no idea. psychology, and sociology and also concepts to have him learn. seriously.

Understanding how people react to things may help him when he re-enters the school system for High School. DO NOT home school him during his HS years. Those are the years he actually gets a nationally recognized Diploma, as well as has the ability to gain those experiences.

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Towards the OP:

Homeschooling is amazing. I homeschooled my sisters, they were older than Pre-k/kindergarten (junior high). I live in Oklahoma, so I was able to structure the curriculum how I saw fit. I was able to customize it how my sisters learned, and when they decided to enter back to Public school (High School) they all tested high,etc. Even with their learning disabilities. Which greatly surprised the teacher who tested my sisters back into school (Because it wasn't accredited/they didn't go though their system they had to see if they were "fit" to gain entry into the grade they were entering)

The internet has tons of free sources for things that you may need.

And as everyone else keeps saying...join groups! Not just for social interaction, it can become stressful (My mom couldn't handle everyone always being in the house. lol)

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My favorite curricula for homeschooling:

Sonlight for English, literature, and history - they're expensive to buy the packages, but if you get the catalog you can get most of them through inter-library loan. Honey for a Child's Heart is a great compilation of books every child should read.

For math, nothing beats Saxon! Stay away from Abeka - laaaaame.

I homeschooled off and on, and it can certainly be done right! My best friend homeschooled from 2nd grade on, and she's brilliant and successful, and my husband was homeschooled his whole life, and I liked him enough to marry him ;)

I was always allowed to pick my type of schooling, and I've loved my parents for it - if your children crave the socialization of going to public school, let'em. Public schools can have opportunities you just can't get at home. There's no "right" choice for schooling, as long as it's stimulating!

Check and see what the relationship your district has with homeschoolers - while some districts are hostile, some can be terrific. My husband played in the orchestra, went to Italy with their chorale group in high school, and was able to get many of the perks of being a student.

The true value of homeschooling is in the experiences it can afford - road trips to battle fields for history, spending days at museums, etc. Some of my favorite memories are my mom reading to us on the front porch for hours - how many kids get to do that?

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For math, nothing beats Saxon! Stay away from Abeka - laaaaame.

do that?

Totally agree with this. Abeka and I didn't get along. Saxon was tough but good. For the most part, I taught myself math from these books. My Mom was math-challenged. lol

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