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Homeschool curriculum?

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You are reading page 3 of Homeschool curriculum?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

I guess I have nothing to contribute on this thread then, either.

Unsubscribe.

Oh well, Deb and I both talked about the pros of homeschooling . . and I haven't found the curriculum yet either!

I'll betcha Elvish benefits from things both you and multi had to say. :up:

steph

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Elvish and I posted at about the same time . . see, I was right! :D

steph

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Many moons ago, when I homeschooled my young children for about 4 years each, I used an eclectic mix of materials. One of my friends had enormous success with early intervention with her daughter with Down Syndrome using the program from the Institutes for the Achievement of the Human Potential in Philadelphia. I used many of her items, i.e., "bits of information" and word cards. I also used the "Sing, Spell, Read, and Write," a phonics program set to music to teach them both to read. I found this program astonishingly easy to implement with very successful outcomes. I also bought tons of children's books from yard sales and used to read to my kids constantly. The main curriculum we used was the ABeka program; but I also supplemented with whatever innovations I could find.

Sorry you had a negative experience, Multi. Homeschooling isn't for everyone. We homeschooled because the public schools in our area of NC are statistical outliers, at the far outer limits of the "poor quality" spectrum. And we couldn't afford Christian/ private schools at the time. Hope this helps! Contact me if you need any further info on my experience :)

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This thread and some research has changed my thinking about homeschooling. I was at my neighborhood pool recently, and saw some of the kids and their "socialization." This is a regular occasion; I hear their conversations, even though I'd rather not. If I had a child, I'd want my child nowhere near these kids. They seem so aggressive, vulgar, and lacking a moral center.

I did some research, too. This article helped to change my thinking about homeschooling:

Medlin, R. G. (2000). Home schooling and the question of socialization. Peabody Journal of Education, 75(1), 107-123. doi:10.1207/S15327930PJE751&2_7

So anyway, thank you, Elvish, for this thread. I no longer "see red" when I see or hear "homeschooling." Good luck with your decision and efforts to do this with your little one. I still think socialization is so important with homeschooling because I know what it's like to lack it as a child, and the consequences. However, I can now understand and appreciate homeschooling, when done well.

Edited by ElvishDNP
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our elementary schools (in boston) were perfectly good, so homeschooling wasn't a consideration.

i too, would have been concerned about the lack of socialization w/home schooling.

we have a neighbor who homeschools her five kids.

their only socialization is w/their church...on weekends.

but i honestly do not know enough to make blanket statements.

i'm just glad our schools served my kid's needs (well, 2/3).

leslie

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This thread and some research has changed my thinking about homeschooling. I was at my neighborhood pool recently, and saw some of the kids and their "socialization." This is a regular occasion; I hear their conversations, even though I'd rather not. If I had a child, I'd want my child nowhere near these kids. They seem so aggressive, vulgar, and lacking a moral center.

I did some research, too. This article helped to change my thinking about homeschooling:

Medlin, R. G. (2000). Home schooling and the question of socialization. Peabody Journal of Education, 75(1), 107-123. doi:10.1207/S15327930PJE751&2_7

So anyway, thank you, Elvish, for this thread. I no longer "see red" when I see or hear "homeschooling." Good luck with your decision and efforts to do this with your little one. I still think socialization is so important with homeschooling because I know what it's like to lack it as a child, and the consequences. However, I can now understand and appreciate homeschooling, when done well.

My computer at work is acting up so if I already mentioned this . . . sorry.

My niece is 3 and started pre-school where she came home with "Daddy, can we play tickle tongues?" and then flipped her mom off at the dinner table when her mom asked her to finish her dinner.

My 8 year old came home from Kindergarten a few years ago saying the "F" word.

Socialization can be negative too . . . :coollook:

steph

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My niece is 3 and started pre-school where she came home with "Daddy, can we play tickle tongues?" and then flipped her mom off at the dinner table when her mom asked her to finish her dinner.

My 8 year old came home from Kindergarten a few years ago saying the "F" word.

Socialization can be negative too . . . :coollook:

steph

a lack of socialization in the early yrs, can cause irreparable harm.

but teaching a child right from wrong (tickle tongues, f-word) doesn't seem as drastic.

besides, we can't protect our children from negative events for the rest of their lives.

leslie

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It's a fine balance, for sure. We struggle with this even now. There is one child in his (Baptist, very conservative Christian) preschool that is a complete and total BRAT. I mean, just completely obnoxious, to the point that when I go volunteer there it is extremely hard to be kind to her (even though she of all people probably needs it). A 5 year child, and that's really sad that it has to be like that. My son has picked up a few things from her that we've worked very hard to 'unlearn' at home. It has worked but it was HARD.

When I was in highschool one of the teams in our league was a homeschool network, and they were good. It was obvious they practiced together.

There are homeschooling networks in my area so plugging in to one wouldn't be hard. Actually, there are a couple - one is 'Christian', and one is 'crunchy', if y'all don't mind the broad generalizations just for the sake of discussion. I'm sure there are smaller more informal ones too. We'll have to see. The public school that we're districted into is a good one, so we'll have to weigh that option closer to the time. And we have a good charter school in this area too. Decisions, decisions...

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i definitely see the advantages and disadvantages to both systems.

but, i would feel better knowing there was a homeschooling network in my area, knowing that it would increase the likelihood of the kids socializing together.

whatever you decide elvish, i know your decision will be heartfelt and what is best for your son.

leslie

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Plus - there are ways to socialize as I mentioned - my older kids played baseball starting at T-ball level and soccer at the same age. All 3. My daughter was in 4-H and learned about horses and rode her own horse in competitions. My middle son raised a steer in FFA. Both boys played flag football. They were in Scouts. And we went went as a group to Mt. Shasta where the kids skied once a week with a group of other kids - lessons in the morning, free skiing in the afternoon. Once a year we all trekked over to the coast for a week of science camp.

There is nothing about public school or homeschool that precludes kids from either joining in activities outside school or not joining in activities outside school.

I've met many public school kids whose parents didn't let them do anything except school.

It goes both ways.

And what is nice is that your decision does not need to be set in stone . . .. if you make a choice and then it doesn't work well, change your choice! Easy peasy. :up:

steph

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I am using sonlight. We LOVE it.

I consider it a success when my girls is sneaking of with books to read for fun. I will go looking for a book in the sequence and will be unable to locate it. When I ask her she gets a sheepish grin and will say..."It might be in my room...":yeah:

We have been homeschooling for 2 and a half years with no plans to stop anytime soon. I love being with my babies. I find that some days I may be learning as much as the kids are. I love the fact that if my kiddos express an interest in any given subject we can explore to our hearts content.

I agree with deb that our school days don't last as long as public school where they are tryingto herd 20-30 kids through the material.

Sometimes people will ask me if I am going to send dd to ps, my response typically is this: When they can catch up with my dd we may consider it.

side note to Deb. OMG I cannot believe your ds is a senior!!!! I remember video chatting when he was like 9-10 and your dd was like 3!!! wow, where does the time go?

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LISA!!! Hey hey hey girl! Catch me up on you. I am on FB; PM me and I will give you my information.

I agree that homeschooling is not for every family and every situation. It's never to be undertaken lightly or without thought and planning. But it can be rewarding. I have to say, my kids picked up a LOT of bad stuff in public school. But there is good, too. My daughter THRIVES in the public school arena. She is very active in volleyball, band, choir and other activities and is learning well. My son on the other hand, could have done better continuing to homeschool. But high school is tough and I think if I had kept him home, he would have made us all miserable. He, also, is active in sports and has made a lot of friends, both positive and not-so-positive.

Pluses and minuses in anything. I say, try it and see how your child does. If it's not for you two, you will come to know it and you can always go back to PS or private school later, as we did. It's never a waste of your time and talents and you will be learning a lot right along with your own child.

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