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Hello All Icebreaker

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You are reading page 2 of Hello All Icebreaker. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Nice to meet you! I have been a nurse almost 45 years (graduated 1975), working ICU and float at first, then Cath Lab, then Radiology/Cath Lab 21 years and most recently Cardiology: Cath Lab, Stress Lab, Case Management. 

Hope to see more of you!

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50 minutes ago, dianah said:

Nice to meet you! I have been a nurse almost 45 years (graduated 1975), working ICU and float at first, then Cath Lab, then Radiology/Cath Lab 21 years and most recently Cardiology: Cath Lab, Stress Lab, Case Management. 

Hope to see more of you!

Thanks dianah and good to meet you too.  I thought I had been a nurse a long time-wow!  Keep on keeping on:)

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I graduated in 1970, when we were not allowed to use gloves for anything except surgical dressing changes, otherwise it was "Wash your hands" regardless of the effluvia/excretory stuff you got to clean up.

Yep, and they sold cigarettes in a machine in the hospital lobby. We still wore uni's including ones school cap. No hair resting on the collar,  and if you knelt down and the skirt hem did not touch the floor, it was tooooo short! 

Somewhere in here there are a bunch of us "Crusty Old Bats"!

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1 minute ago, No Stars In My Eyes said:

I graduated in 1970, when we were not allowed to use gloves for anything except surgical dressing changes, otherwise it was "Wash your hands" regardless of the effluvia/excretory stuff you got to clean up.

Yep, and they sold cigarettes in a machine in the hospital lobby. We still wore uni's including ones school cap. No hair resting on the collar,  and if you knelt down and the skirt hem did not touch the floor, it was tooooo short! 

Somewhere in here there are a bunch of us "Crusty Old Bats"!

Too funny!  I love hearing stories like that.  My father, who is also a nurse (retired), tells a story about meeting up with hospital coworkers after work many years ago.  The group apparently stopped of at a local bar for drinks and the next day all of the employees (except Dad) were summarily fired.  Dad was the only one of the group that had changed out of his nursing uniform before leaving work.  Management thought this behavior (frequenting a bar) was unbecoming and reflected poorly on the hospital.  Don't think that would fly today-how times have changed

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How dare those nurses be human beings! I hardly think it would be a problem, unless they got in a stinkin' fight or something. That might be worth a scolding by the DON, or a suspension, but getting canned for sitting in a bar with their uni's on...? 

And speaking of do's and don't's "back then"....you absolutely did NOT wear your cap in public! I used to see the TV shows where nurses always wore their caps...in a restaurant, on the train, in a car. It was both shocking and laughable at the time.

So many constant changes and differences!

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I earned my RN in '92 as well! I was an LPN for six years prior, and experienced some old stuff. Although we all got caps, they weren't required, and I never got used to the feeling. And ours were super wide (think Flying Nun) and would get caught on the bed curtains and nearly rip your hair out.  One cap rule I remember was  it wasn't to be worn outside. And we learned to glue the stripe on with KY jelly. 

And patients smoking in the rooms, gag. There was no smoking at the nurses station, but there was a corner in the cafeteria for smokers. 

Most of my career was in Med/Surg and cardiac. I tried teaching for a couple of years, and now work at the local health department with TB patients. 

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10 minutes ago, nursej22 said:

I earned my RN in '92 as well! I was an LPN for six years prior, and experienced some old stuff. Although we all got caps, they weren't required, and I never got used to the feeling. And ours were super wide (think Flying Nun) and would get caught on the bed curtains and nearly rip your hair out.  One cap rule I remember was  it wasn't to be worn outside. And we learned to glue the stripe on with KY jelly. 

And patients smoking in the rooms, gag. There was no smoking at the nurses station, but there was a corner in the cafeteria for smokers. 

Most of my career was in Med/Surg and cardiac. I tried teaching for a couple of years, and now work at the local health department with TB patients. 

The hospital I worked at in my early years did allow nurses to smoke at the nurses' station and sometimes the smoke would be so thick it looked like an opium den.  Can you imagine a more unhealthy environment for sick/recovering patients?  Do you like Community Health and your role with TB patients?

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I graduated Assoc program in 1974 , BSN couple years later. Retired 2010. Health issues combined with just being tired of it all did it for me.

Sometimes I think I miss working just an itty bitty bit. Particularly when I learn something really new & interesting to me.  I learn things from AN (recently was some cardiology stuff).

I missed wearing my whites and a cap. You notice I said "A cap" - was not my school cap. My school cap was OK ;I  guess if I was working out-of-town, it would have been unique for the area. And I had had a confrontation with a nsg supervisor way early in my career. My school cap fell off during a code and I just threw it aside out  of the way. Well, nsg supervisor confronts me, "Ms  amo, you're not wearing your cap. Didn't you sign the green dress code page in the employee handbook?  You're out of uniform ......." TRUE STORY!

Well, it wasn't that I didn't like caps/hats. I loved them. It was just that my school cap was kind of flippy, soft crowned and hard to secure. So I went out and bought the biggest, widest winged Flying Nun cap I could buy. And I would spread out the wings to make it so wide it would have to squeeze into the clear vinyl cap case (remember them?).

Also I would KY the stripes which I varied every week or so. A single wide black stripe, then 2 slender dark green stripes, then one slender blue stripe up and down the sides, two red stripes diagonal on one wing, etc. The employee handbook only said "must wear a cap" and school pin.. It didn't say it had to be my SCHOOL cap. So I got 'em on a technicality!!! Had no problem with my school pin. Just the cap. And one of the other nurses laughingly told me that my cap had been a conversation among the nsg higher-uppers. Oh, I could be a real pisser!

Just a thought to bring up. Remember when we could buy "Kay's Caps" and "Reeves" metallic name bars/badges from the catalog advertisements that were in AJN? And every other page or so had big hiring advertisements.

Ahhhh! Smoking used to be allowed anywhere in the hospital. Then they restricted us to the floor's lounge area and nsg conference room; then just the nsg conf room. Oh, how the smoke just smoke-stormed out of there! Kind of reminds me of those outdoor designated smoking areas where folk would be huddled under the patio roof. Hated to have to run thru the gauntlet of smoke! "

"The only constant is change".

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8 minutes ago, amoLucia said:

I graduated Assoc program in 1974 , BSN couple years later. Retired 2010. Health issues combined with just being tired of it all did it for me.

Sometimes I think I miss working just an itty bitty bit. Particularly when I learn something really new & interesting to me.  I learn things from AN (recently was some cardiology stuff).

I missed wearing my whites and a cap. You notice I said "A cap" - was not my school cap. My school cap was OK ;I  guess if I was working out-of-town, it would have been unique for the area. And I had had a confrontation with a nsg supervisor way early in my career. My school cap fell off during a code and I just threw it aside out  of the way. Well, nsg supervisor confronts me, "Ms  amo, you're not wearing your cap. Didn't you sign the green dress code page in the employee handbook?  You're out of uniform ......." TRUE STORY!

Well, it wasn't that I didn't like caps/hats. I loved them. It was just that my school cap was kind of flippy, soft crowned and hard to secure. So I went out and bought the biggest, widest winged Flying Nun cap I could buy. And I would spread out the wings to make it so wide it would have to squeeze into the clear vinyl cap case (remember them?).

Also I would KY the stripes which I varied every week or so. A single wide black stripe, then 2 slender dark green stripes, then one slender blue stripe up and down the sides, two red stripes diagonal on one wing, etc. The employee handbook only said "must wear a cap" and school pin.. It didn't say it had to be my SCHOOL cap. So I got 'em on a technicality!!! Had no problem with my school pin. Just the cap. And one of the other nurses laughingly told me that my cap had been a conversation among the nsg higher-uppers. Oh, I could be a real pisser!

Just a thought to bring up. Remember when we could buy "Kay's Caps" and "Reeves" metallic name bars/badges from the catalog advertisements that were in AJN? And every other page or so had big hiring advertisements.

Ahhhh! Smoking used to be allowed anywhere in the hospital. Then they restricted us to the floor's lounge area and nsg conference room; then just the nsg conf room. Oh, how the smoke just smoke-stormed out of there! Kind of reminds me of those outdoor designated smoking areas where folk would be huddled under the patio roof. Hated to have to run thru the gauntlet of smoke! "

"The only constant is change".

Yes, I remember well my mom's nursing cap.  I also remember that back in the day, nurses carried a multi-colored pen for charting.  Each shift wrote in a designated color, something like; day shift-black: 3-11 shift-green, and graveyard shift-red.

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I was a CNA before it was common. Because I was under 21 attending a university I was put on "Progress Probation" when I dropped chemistry because I had to pass 15 units a semester at that young age. I finished that semester with "A"s and "B"s and then move home and attended Jr. College. In 1 1.2 years I had two AA degrees. One was in biology and the other was early childhood education. I also took a three unit evening CNA class. 

I worked at the VA for almost two years and then when my kids were small I was a licensed day care provider for 3 1/2 years. 

When I was 30 in 1974 I earned my LVN license. As an LVN on a med-surg unit I followed the dress code of white dress or pants uniform and a cap with no stripe, but the initials of the school embroidered in light blue. One evening I was the only one wearing a cap although we had two wonderful RNs.

A man I'd never seen tapped me on the shoulder and said, "There is a fire in the dumb waiter room."

I went to that room and told him, "There is no fire in here."

He became angry as he told me. "Why didn't you read the notice about the fire drill? We made sure one was in each registered nurse's mail slot." 

I showed my badge and name tad that had "LVN in 18 point type and said, "I am not an RN."

He then asked, "What would you do if there was a fire?"

I recited the protocol including closing doors, calling "Code Red" and the fire department and such.

After my kids were in high school I attended the local community college RN program for two years. I worked four 8 hour night shifts a week while attending nursing school in the day. (I had taken all prerequisites already) That was 1986 and I was 42.

Then I did a BSN program for working nurses and finally earned my BSN in 1994, just months before turning 50. 

I took university critical care courses with people planning to be clinical nurse specialists and then dropped out. It was time consuming and expensive, but I learned a lot. I used that knowledge until retiring at almost 70 in 2014.

So I worked 42 years in hospitals, all but two as a licensed nurse.

 

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I took a 15 month LPN course at a Catholic hospital. They were in the process of changing the program from 18 months down to 12 months, and my class was the only 15 month course. (Bragging: I graduated second in my class!) 

When I graduated I wanted to go work at the biggest scariest place I could, because I wanted to learn as much as I could so I wouldn't be nervous under any circumstances. I started out at Mass General in Boston. I liked variety, so later I did a lot of float jobs at various hospitals and then through an Upjohn agency, did staffing at a bunch of other hospitals in and around Nashville, TN.

I graduated in early 1971 and worked as an LPN until 2010. Had a muck-up at a nursing home, where the DON unnecessarily turned me in to The Board. I went through a class required to get my license back (I was not turned in for drug diversion). When the time came to go before The Board to get my license back, a plethora of events kept me from getting all the way across the state to their only office. So, basically I let my license lapse in 2012, then worked as a private duty CNA because by then I really did not like all the changes going on in nursing, and everything was getting more and more expensive (mandatory CEU's we had to pay for out of pocket, and the licensing fee went way up. And the pay went way down.) But I still liked taking care of folks, so I kept on working a 36 hr week (also all weekends and holidays). 

Then in March 2017, my hubby wanted me to retire. We moved to his mom's house in another city in May 2017 and have been here ever since, while she loses more and more of her mind, and we try to hang onto our sanity.

I preferred the old-fashioned nursing....no computers, no pagers, no cell phones, and only 8 hour shifts. I was a staunch 3-11-er and also worked every weekend and most holidays, my choice. I really enjoyed being an LPN!

 

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5 minutes ago, No Stars In My Eyes said:

I took a 15 month LPN course at a Catholic hospital. They were in the process of changing the program from 18 months down to 12 months, and my class was the only 15 month course. (Bragging: I graduated second in my class!) 

When I graduated I wanted to go work at the biggest scariest place I could, because I wanted to learn as much as I could so I wouldn't be nervous under any circumstances. I started out at Mass General in Boston. I liked variety, so later I did a lot of float jobs at various hospitals and then through an Upjohn agency, did staffing at a bunch of other hospitals in and around Nashville, TN.

I graduated in early 1971 and worked as an LPN until 2010. Had a muck-up at a nursing home, where the DON unnecessarily turned me in to The Board. I went through a class required to get my license back (I was not turned in for drug diversion). When the time came to go before The Board to get my license back, a plethora of events kept me from getting all the way across the state to their only office. So, basically I let my license lapse in 2012, then worked as a private duty CNA because by then I really did not like all the changes going on in nursing, and everything was getting more and more expensive (mandatory CEU's we had to pay for out of pocket, and the licensing fee went way up. And the pay went way down.) But I still liked taking care of folks, so I kept on working a 36 hr week (also all weekends and holidays). 

Then in March 2017, my hubby wanted me to retire. We moved to his mom's house in another city in May 2017 and have been here ever since, while she loses more and more of her mind, and we try to hang onto our sanity.

I preferred the old-fashioned nursing....no computers, no pagers, no cell phones, and only 8 hour shifts. I was a staunch 3-11-er and also worked every weekend and most holidays, my choice. I really enjoyed being an LPN!

 

Nice, thank you for sharing.  Sounds like you have some great experience:)

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