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ixchel ixchel (Member)

Genetic testing - would you? Did you?

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Thank you for sharing thoughts, everyone. I wonder - do you think your significant others share your feelings? (If you are in a committed relationship.)

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I would definitely get tested regarding the BRCA1 or BRCA2 test if my family history indicated it. You can do so much to prevent getting cancer and I'd do it in a heartbeat. Off with the boobies! And no reconstruction! Off with the "lady parts".

Regarding early-onset Alzheimers . . . I'd probably do it. There is a way to genetically look at that. But the regular Alzheimers dementia, so far, has no genetic marker. As far as I've ready anyway.

My mom has dementia but I think her's is caused by her life and I won't go into detail about that. Her mother was active, healthy, smart, and very busy well into her 80's but fell and broke her hip. After surgery she had some memory issues and then some tragic things happened in her life and she got worse. I don't think she has true Alzheimers.

Everyone is different as evidenced by the responses so far on this thread.

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I wouldn't get tested for a genetic disorder, unless I was still having children, and the outcome affected them.

For myself, no. If the results were bad, it would alter every single area of my life. Some people would welcome the opportunity to change things. To be a different person.

I prefer to just be who I am, and allow my future to unfold without knowing what it is.

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Well, I had the Braca run for me, after being diagnosed with breast cancer; I am negative, and yet, between my two sisters and I, we've been diagnosed with 5 different breast cancers in the last three years. I think it is somewhat reassuring for my daughters, knowing they are not necessarily "doomed" for breast CA. And, the research is showing preemptive mastectomies don't have a lower incidence of later diagnosis. Really!!?? Doesn't make sense but there it is.

With Alzheimers, likely wouldn't, as others have said, don't want that hanging over my head. I think we should all have the plans in place for any catastrophic event (says the woman with 2 types of BC who still hasn't filled out an advance directive :whistling: ).

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Tough call. I'm not sure if it would be harder to not know or to know. I'd probably get tested for BRCA, but Alzheimers? I doubt it.

A friend of mine in high school had Huntington's chorea (autosomal dominant) and died about five years after we graduated, so she'd have been 23. Her father had died from it. Her older brother refused to get tested because he just didn't want to know....got married, had kids. Started showing symptoms in his mid-30s and died within a couple years. I just can't wrap my head around the devastation the mother must have felt to watch her husband then both her kids progressively decline then die without her being able to do anything at all but watch. But back to the point, I can understand why the older brother didn't want to get tested. What would it have changed for him?

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Thank you for sharing thoughts, everyone. I wonder - do you think your significant others share your feelings? (If you are in a committed relationship.)

No, mine does not. Mine would hands down, have the testing.

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Thank you for sharing thoughts, everyone. I wonder - do you think your significant others share your feelings? (If you are in a committed relationship.)

Mine is a tough law enforcement type who thinks nothing bad is ever going to happen to him, so, no.

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Thank you for sharing thoughts, everyone. I wonder - do you think your significant others share your feelings? (If you are in a committed relationship.)

Mine wouldn't get tested, I'm sure. Hard enough to get him to go for a physical every 5 yrs.

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Am not interested in testing.

Many years ago when DNA testing was in its infancy, I knew a woman who tested positive for some marker. She was devastated.

That woman, the dtr of one of our Alz residents, was a practicing psychiatrist. She knew her risk factors, the probability statistics, lifestyle management, 'THE WORKS', etc. But that look of devastation and her tears are still memorable.

I'll NOT test.

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But back to the point, I can understand why the older brother didn't want to get tested. What would it have changed for him?

Maybe he could have made an educated choice as to whether to have children and risk possibly passing this horrific disease on to them? Huntingtons is miserable so I would imagine his last years weren't easy on the family either.

I'm a big fan of being in as much control as I possibly can especially with regard to how I check out of this lifetime if at all possible. If there were something lurking in the wings that I was aware of and there was a test I would do it. Although not politically correct one of the reasons I didn't have children is due to some familial issues on both sides so I tend to be suspicious of the power of genetics.

My hubby wouldn't have anything done, he's Catholic, lol, but he supports whatever I want to do while I'm able to decide for myself. He is not however listed on my Advanced Directive as I'm not sure I could trust him to follow my wishes of no treatment except pain medication. Then again he gets my fortune and it is bountiful enough for decades of hookers and beer, so he might just pull the plug quickly, lol.

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