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excuses for OverEating

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Most every woman has a food angel and devil resting on either shoulder, one giving permission to indulge even as the other advises against it.

"We've come to label foods as 'good' and 'bad,' so we feel guilty when we eat something we believe we shouldn't," says Harley Pasternak, celebrity trainer (to Lady Gaga and Katy Perry) and author of the book "The Body Reset Diet."

But we've also become masters at rationalizing what we put into our mouths, which can lead to overeating, dubious food choices and even weight gain.

Evelyn Tribole, a registered dietician and nutritionist in Newport Beach, California, says, "Let's get rid of the guilt! Women need to remember that having foods they love won't make or break their diets as a whole."

Readers bravely let us into their heads to hear how they justify dining decisions, then experts shared some eye-openers. Bet you can relate!

"As long as it's a 'good' fat, like the kind in avocados or almonds, I can have as much as I want," --Stacy Rogers Sharp, Austin, Texas.

Reality check! For sure, certain fats are beneficial.

"Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats help reduce cholesterol and lower the risk of heart disease and stroke," says Dr. Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Still, they are just as fattening as the bad-boy saturated kind found in cheese and red meat. There are 9 calories in every gram of fat, generally twice the density of proteins and carbohydrates, points out Caroline Kaufman, a registered dietician nutritionist in San Francisco.

Nutrition guidelines to keep in mind: 30% of your calories should come from fat, with less than 10% from the saturated kind.

In other words, favoring heart-healthy fats like the ones in nuts, avocado and olive oil: good. Treating them like an all-you-can-eat buffet: bad.

source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/07/26/health/bad-overeating/index.html?hpt=he_c2

Edited by Esme12
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I have a different attitude about food.

Eat when you are hungry.

If you are not active (walking around your house and garage does NOT count) you need smaller portions.

ENJOY each bite.

ENJOY a nice beverage of your choice with the meal.

Most of us DO NOT require 3 squares or the amount of food we consume over the course of the day.

Small frequent meals serve us well in many situations and life styles.

If your diet consists of anywhere near 25% processed or pre-prepared foods you are likely not as lean as you could be.

Cut cow's milk out of your drinking choices and use only sparingly for other purposes.

Lot's of us have emotional ties to our eating habits...we have to ferret those out and deal with them...not easy but doable.

I have a friend who is so emotionally wrapped up in her eating habits that she is stuck in the diet of a 4-6 year old. I think you can imagine what that is like, both for her and for others when around at meal time.

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I have a friend who is so emotionally wrapped up in her eating habits that she is stuck in the diet of a 4-6 year old. I think you can imagine what that is like, both for her and for others when around at meal time.

I'm interested in what the diet of a 4-6 year old looks like to you. Would you elaborate?

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She doesn't eat anything green.

Texture is a HUGE thing for her.

Her staple foods are rice and potatoes, with crackers and bread as fill ins.

No gravies, no sauces, no condiments.

She loves pie and bakes all the time although she doesn't eat most of what she bakes...pie.

She cooks for her family by recipe, she tastes none of it.

She leaves the room if you eat pizza because she doesn't like the smell of the cooked cheese.

She doesn't like "spices" she says...but she likes cinnamon, Dr. Pepper.

More importantly, perhaps, is the fact that her food likes and dislikes are the topic of her conversation a HUGE portion of the time. She is fixated on what she can and cannot eat and makes it difficult for others to eat with her.

I find her behavior very similar to that of the 4-6 year old age group.

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