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somenurse somenurse (Member)

Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

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You are reading page 5 of Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

*** Neither you, nor any other person has ever brought one of my dogs to a gas chamer and you never will. I have two hounds. One female who is spayed cause, even though she is a good hunting dog, she is not outstanding enough to use for breeding future generations of huting hounds. I also have a male who is truely outstanding. He is not casterated so that he can be used as a stud. Whenever there is enough people on the puppy waiting list we breed him to my hunting buddies female bluetick and get a litter of pups. Usually about one litter every other year. These dogs are all spoken for months or years in advance. These dogs can not be replaced by pound dogs. Nobody is going to take a chance of wasting the vast amount of time and money it takes to train a hunting dog for the specific type of hunting we do unless they can be assured that the pup has the natural instinct and desire bred into them. You know about border collies. They make great herding dogs and when I farmed full time I had several for that reason. While it MAY be possible to train a pit bull to herd cattle it won't be easy and they won't ever be as good at it as border collies are. The same is true for my hounds. The reason we origionaly developed specific breeds of dogs was to do certain jobs for us. Jobs that mutts can't (with rare exceptions) do. My dogs have jobs.

I understand the heart break you must feel gassing those dogs. I couldn't do it. However that is a seperate and totaly unrelated issue to why my hound is not casterated. In the end one more potentialy fine dog will have to go to the gas chamber cause some city person decided that it is unethical for me to have an intact male dog

That said my wife and kids would like a nice smaller house dog (hounds are outside most of the time, but are allowed in the house during the night in winter. They each have their own dog bed in the living room). I don't need this dog for a specific job and a variety of breeds or mutts would fit the bill. I would be happy to give an older pound dog a good home, but in the end I will end up buying one since I don't have a fenced yard and have an intact male hound. How me buying another dog for a house dog and sending a pound mutt to the gas chamber benifits the dog over populations problem I don't get.

*** Yes I understyand and agree about the problem. However I am not responsible for even one of those 4 to 6 million dogs put to death every year and never will be.

*** I am not going to do that. I am all for spaying and nutering most dogs. However those of us who have real jobs for dogs need to breed dogs who can do them. I see this insistance that all dogs be spayed or neutered as another example of city people's anti rural bias. It's all fine and well to spay companion dogs. Those of us in rural areas who need real working dogs for hunting or livestock guarding or herding need to be able to selectivly breed such dogs. Dog breeds are not interchangable. For example I used to duck hunt with a black lab. Labs and the retriever breeds have been bred to tolerate very cold water for long periods of time. A pound mutt would freeze to death for lack of the proper coat. Not all dogs have the same sence of smell. I need a dog with a superior sence of smell. Far beyond what the common dog posseses.

Your reasons for having a litter now and then, are more rational than most people's reasons. Still, you allow an unneutered male dog to run free. You may be responsible for many many more litters than the ones you know about.

I LOVE LOVE LOVE that each pup you create, has a home ahead of time, oh how i wish more people did that. But, each pup does create tons and tons of more pups, on and on. Hopefully, the people you give each pup to, are aware of dog overpopulation.

Pups have GRANDCHILDREN, and great grandchildren, and great great grandchildren....on and on,

increasing exponentially, creating 100s and even 1000s of extra dogs that you don't seem able to envision when you create just the six puppies...Unless, you make each owner you give a dog to, sign an agreement to fix their pup to avoid this happening to your dogs' progeny ending up in dog pounds.

Otherwise, you have no idea who will be doing what with the grandchildren of the litter you put out there.

I do not see the "anti rural bias" you seem able to see, at all. I am not sure where or why you have this notion, but, i'm sorry for whatever happened that makes you insert this into unrelated topics, like dog overpopulation crisis. I live in the country myself, i do not feel discriminated against, at all, no idea why you feel that.

I don't care if a dog lives in the city,

or out in the country, with very few exceptions of dogs who are well monitored, (your's aren't, they run free unattended) dogs should be fixed.

I don't care where the dogs live.

I have already conceded, your reasons for wanting a hunting dog, are different than most people's needs in A PET.

but, I feel it is debatable you couldn't find an awesome bluetick hound on petfinders,(there are usually 100s and 100s and 100s of bluetick hounds on petfinders, more in some seaons or years than others, as well as many other kinds of hounds)

and i feel it is debatable if every pup in a litter inherits the talents of their parents,

but, again, i've said a few times now,

your needs in a hunting dog are not typical of most humans seeking a pet dog.

Your final remarks, make it sound like you are unaware the dog pounds are chockful of labs and retrievers.(?) As if those breeds have to be "bought" to acquire?

Today, there are about 30,000 labs on petfinder,

and about 33,000 retrievers.

some weeks, it is far far more.

Edited by somenurse

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//" Yes I understyand and agree about the problem. However I am not responsible for even one of those 4 to 6 million dogs put to death every year and never will be."//

so you DO make those who take your litters of pups, sign agreements to fix the dogs you are putting out there? Otherwise, you can not make this claim, as you will have no way to know where the 100s and 100s grandchildren and great grandchildren and great great great granchildren of YOUR first litter are.

Y2Spay.jpg

^you have to click to make pic big enough to see it

Edited by somenurse

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I will go ahead and place my own opinions to the questions that I posed a week ago. I will try and keep it short.

So where do shelter dogs come from? In this area, shelter dogs have many sources. The one that everyone assumes is that most of the dogs are from local sources. They are not. Most are imported from the states that have commercial breeders and puppy mills. They are often transported across state lines without health certificates or health clearances. They may or may not be desexed and many of them have no known vaccination history. Some are positive for heartworm disease, which is quite costly to treat. Some have brought parasites into the area that were not here before. Many, if not most have severe dental disease that must be taken care of by their new owners or the rescue that brought them into the area. Again this is at great expense to the rescue and/or the new owner.

The dogs turned in from local people of which there are few are usually desexed and have proof of vaccinations. Some even come in with their own little box of heartworm preventative. The dogs that come in from the locals are usually from people who have lost their homes due to buying more house then they have income for or the loss of an owner. Sadly the are has few pet friendly rentals for modest rent.

Why are they better then a well bred dog from an ethical breeder? In my opinion, they really are not. Again it's all in what the person wants in a dog. So again to each his own. It is certainly true that all dogs deserve good homes. Pet ownership is at an all time low in the US.

How do ethical breeders contribute to the "over population problem"? Again in my opinion they do not.Ethical breeders take dogs of their breeding back no questions asked. Most also do not refund but some actually do. Most are involved in breed rescue. An ethical breeder is not a breeder of show dogs either. Some show breeders just add to the problem. Sadly ethical breeders are being forced out of business because of limit laws and laws limiting breeding. These are law abiding people. Sadly all breeding and limit laws do is to drive the crap breeders further underground where the dogs will get even less care then they are already given.

 

As far as others posting your work: I have seen much of that all other the web including the ASPCA, HSUS, and PeTA websites

 

Fuzzy

Love most of this!!! I have no idea where you live, but, although i LOVE and strongly agree with many to most of these remarks,

i disagree very much that most dog pound dogs have crappy teeth. (obviously, if a dog is older, their teeth will be older, too).

No idea where you get that idea.

I picked out worst dog i could find, that's how i am. This is not for everyone, but, i go for "hot mess" dogs everytime. :laugh: My dog could barely stand, was a bag of bones covered with skanky matted fur and feces and urine burns. and he had a bad attitude, total gangsta, he ws in the death row box.

Here he is today:

062.jpg

^you have to click on it, i tried to pick photo where his gleaming white teeth show. He is a most AWESOME dog, oh wow, you name it, my dog can do it!! Perfect lil gentleman, just marvelous dog, but, wow, when we brought HIM home, all our pals thought we were nutz. (even the vet seemed a lil skeptical at first).

*My* dog did come with crappy teeth, cuz i pick out hot mess dogs,

and our vet said he'd want them cleaned, after dog had gained strength and bonded with us. Turns out, our dog's teeth became white as snow, once he had some raw bones to gnaw on, and some decent nutrition. He is about 6 years old now, (so far as we know) and his teeth are still gleaming white!

Also, almost all dogs on Petfinders, are uptodate on shots, dewormed, and fixed. If not, it is stated. dogs with heartworm are clearly noted, (look for little

Otherwise, the majority of these dogs are uptodate, fixed, dewormed. So those remarks of yours about taking home sick dogs seem like bunk to me, too, or not representative of the dogs below:

do look over these marvelous dogs: (some might be your dogs' grandchildren!) Most dogs on petfinders are "ready to go" pets.

Pet Search Results: Adoptable bluetick Dog Pets in Pembroke, GA: Petfinder

Edited by somenurse

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//" Labs and the retriever breeds have been bred to tolerate very cold water for long periods of time. A pound mutt would freeze to death for lack of the proper coat. "//

Here are about 30,000 labs who might disagree:

Pet Search Results: Adoptable lab Dog Pets in Metter, GA: Petfinder

Here are about 32,000 retrievers who'd be real happy to jump in a cold lake:

http://www.petfinder.com/pet-search?pet_breed=Retriever&animal_type=Dog&location=30450

for real,

whatever kind of pet one is looking for, is a real good chance, that pup or dog is waiting for you on Petfinders.

caveat: if you are someone who needs a working dog, and IF you are someone who actually believes that all puppies always inherit their parents talents, then you might be too skeptical to take a working dog from the pound, but,

MANY PEOPLE DO!!! Can be done!

Edited by somenurse

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You are fortunate to have found a dog that just had dirty teeth, The rescues that we have seen here recently have had fractured, infected and abscessed teeth. It's so sad to have to extract 20 plus teeth on a dog that a new owner just got. Adult Dogs have 42 teeth by the way. What's even harder is to give that new owner the bill for much needed dental work that was passed on. While you are willing to take the problem dogs which is very commendable, most do not have the resources or the knowledge to do so. What's even more disheartening is that these problems were not disclosed to these well meaning owners that were trying to do the right thing.

In my opinion, shelters and rescues that pass this stuff on to new owners are no better then unethical breeders that are selling sick puppies.

Fuzzy

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]12290[/ATTACH]

^u have to click to see pic.

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You are fortunate to have found a dog that just had dirty teeth, The rescues that we have seen here recently have had fractured, infected and abscessed teeth. It's so sad to have to extract 20 plus teeth on a dog that a new owner just got. Adult Dogs have 42 teeth by the way. What's even harder is to give that new owner the bill for much needed dental work that was passed on. While you are willing to take the problem dogs which is very commendable, most do not have the resources or the knowledge to do so. What's even more disheartening is that these problems were not disclosed to these well meaning owners that were trying to do the right thing.

In my opinion, shelters and rescues that pass this stuff on to new owners are no better then unethical breeders that are selling sick puppies.

Fuzzy

Oh, my dog was "life=threateningly" malnourished, could barely walk. Had wounds all over him, of all stages, some old wounds, and some still bleeding. He still has a few scars today, testiment to his old gangsta days. Also had urine burns, which were so so deep, we all thought he was a tricolor dog...matted fur that had to be all cut off, and his fur felt like dried straw...He was covered with feces, too, as he had lived his entire life,

24/7

in a cage, not even let out to pee. He'd never run, never touched grass,

nor ever saw a tv set (spent the first days staring behind the tv set, trying to figure THAT out, we had to turn it off so he could relax)

It was easy to see why no one was picking HIM!!

IN later years, we also discovered, he is chockful of bullets, too.

I go for the dogs no one else wants. hard to explain, but, while everyone else is looking for puppies that are purebred, i'm always looking in the deathrow box. That's just me.

Bad teeth, and toothless dogs,

are more the exception, imo, having seen tons and tons of dog pound dogs. And some kinds of skanky teeth in dogs can be helped with nutrition, like my dog. (ha, vet looked miffed, and asked, "Who did you have clean his teeth?")

no one!! just some raw bones and raw chicken necks did the trick. Gleaming white teeth.

It's hard for people like us to imagine that there are humans who might not look at a dog's teeth,(?) even to just guess at the dog's age?

but, like i've said a few times, there are all kinds of humans.

Edited by somenurse

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btw, the dog i took, was, in no way, "passed on" to me. the dog pound really wanted to make sure i understood what a hot mess the dog was. Asked me endless list of questions, and had to get special approval from someone higher up, to let someone have that dog, that they felt should be put down. Multiple, extensive conversations were had with me, and my whole family, asking "well, what will you do if dog does this or that?" on and on,

"well, what what you do if this dog never does get healthy again? or even dies?" I told them, i understood the risk, was willing to take it, and if the dog can't be helped, at least he will die in my arms, and loved, his last days will be fine days, if that is all he has left.

they reeeeally made sure i did know what i was taking home.

If you look over Petfinders, you will see, these humans are doing the best they can, to let the person know, this dog or that dog, has issues. if you call about the dog, more info is given.

Dogs with health issues are clearly marked with heart icons. dogs with various issues are usually clearly marked "no children, no cats" or whatever.

Fuzzy, your words kinda made me think you seem to think shelters are pulling a fast one, nope, they DO want a good match, they do NOT want the dog returned again, after all their work. Shelters do not make cash when someone takes home a homeless dog, its not for profit, they really

actually

want the dogs to be loved.

Pet Search Results: Adoptable Dog Pets in Aaron, GA: Petfinder

Edited by somenurse

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//"The rescues that we have seen here recently have had fractured, infected and abscessed teeth"//

also, worth pointing out, this can happen to purebreds. This can happen to dogs who are well cared for, and loved, and closely observed, too. Dogs that people have spent $1,000s on, can get fractured, infected or even absessed teeth.

Nothing about this has anything to do with dog pounds.

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btw, to Fuzzy, i pasted a remark in a post to you (reply #50)

//"Otherwise, the majority of these dogs are uptodate, fixed, dewormed. So those remarks of yours about taking home sick dogs seem like bunk to me, too, or not representative of the dogs below:

do look over these marvelous dogs: (some might be your dogs' grandchildren!) Most dogs on petfinders are "ready to go" pets.

Pet Search Results: Adoptable bluetick Dog Pets in Pembroke, GA: Petfinder //

.........which i meant to paste into a post to PFMB, not YOU. sorry for mistake!:notworthy:

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the main reason we have too many dogs in dog pounds

is............

there are just too many dogs.

some of these dogs

euthanisedanimals2.jpg

might be grandchildren of dogs whose owners felt "just MY one litter every year or so, just the 50 to 100 puppies that leave my home, their progeny doesn't really add to the millions and millions of dogs being killed each year.."

I just think more humans need to be responsible about taking the utmost care that their dogs are NOT adding to dog overpopulation crisis.

Edited by somenurse

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QUOTE >>>Until you've spent your Saturday bringing dogs to a gas chamber, with a lump in your throat, and tears streaming down your face, as you give that innocent creature one last hug,

until you've walked in those shoes---

calling efforts to reduce the massive influx of MILLIONS AND MILLIONS of homeless dogs into our dog pounds

"a strange agenda"(?)is not fair.>>> QUOTE

I couldn't do that-God Bless all of the shelter workers and volunteers. I do believe in euthanizing unwanted and unadoptable pets in a humane manner (not thowing a dozen or more dogs in a dumpster with a hose hooked up to the gas )I am not a fan of "no-kill" shelters,the ones I've seen are overcrowded,the animals are driven crazy by the stimulation of all of the other unbalanced animals-it's too sad.

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