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somenurse somenurse (Member)

Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.

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You are reading page 2 of Don't buy a dog, not any dog at all.. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

If anyone DOES insist that buying a dog is what they will do,

i at least encourage you to google and learn about "signs of a ethical breeder"

and avoid

at all costs

those dogs bought in stores. Store bought dogs tend to come from parents kept in the most appalling conditions you can imagine.

Caveat: some pet stores, do display dog-pound dogs, as well, as a courtesy to the local humane society, and that is not what i am talking about. Those dogs are clearly labelled as belonging to the local humane society.

Edited by somenurse

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This is one of the few actually rational reasons to "buy" a dog, is when one has to have a working dog. Still, one can meet an adult dog, to assess the inner drive and talent,

and adult dogs CAN LEARN most anything at all.***

*** My dogs are Bluetick coon hounds. I need a dog that has the desire and bred-in instinct to sit at the bottom of a tree with the game in it and bark, for days if nessesary. Also a dog that can locate a track and follow it, despite crossing over the trails of many other kinds of animals and other animals of the same species, possibly much hotter (fresher) and ignore them to stick to the origional track. I need a cold nosed dog (mean superior sence of smell) who can locate and follow a track that may be 5 or more days old. Most breeds of dogs don't have the same abiliety to smell as the sent hound breeds. I have been raccoon, bobcat and bear hunting with hounds for 30 years and have had many dogs. While training them is required, you can not train a dog to do what I have described above enless they have a strong natural instict for it.

I get all of my dogs from other hunters who hunt their dogs and have a litter of puppies every year or two. They are not dog breeders, but hunters who occasionaly have a litter of pups. I doubt anyone would have much sucess selling working breed dogs to hunters from a puppy mill. I would never buy a pup from a ***** who spend her days in a kennel. She must be a top actively working dog (same with the sire) that I can go hunting with and see in action before I would consider buying her pup. I don't know any other hound hunters who would consider buying a hunting prospect from kennel dogs.

I totaly agree with you about the AKC. Blueticks are not recognized by the AKC and if they ever are it will be the kiss of death for the breed, just as it was for Black and Tan coon hounds.

Also, your point about the fence is a valid point, too.

*** I am actually looking or a smaller house dog for my family right now. I would prefer to get an adult dog and I don't care about the breed as long as it is fairly small (say under about 25#) and is alert and active and is good with my two (well dog educated) kids ages 10 and 8. Would prefer an alert dog who will bark when strangers arrive. The local pet adoption agency has several likely looking dogs on their website. However I am not considered elligable since I don't have a fenced yard. I do have a very expensive and high qualiety invisable fence that covers 5 acres and keeps the hounds in but that is not considered a fence by the agency. I tried pointing out that I lived near the end of a long dirt road and that there was far more horse buggy (Amish) traffic on my dirt road than car traffic. It doesn't matter to them. If I don't check the "fenced yard" box on the application I am not considered and elligable dog adopter.

Edited by PMFB-RN

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*** LOL! I just noticed that Allnurses bleeped out my totaly appropiate use of the word b*i*t*c*h. I wonder what our society is coming to when the appropiate use of words is not allowed.

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We also ran into the issue of many independently run rescue orgs and even a few humane societies not wanting to let us adopt because we lived in an apartment. ("You no want cat?") We were looking for a small to medium sized, low-energy dog (preferably older) but from the way we were treated, you could have assumed that we wanted a lab puppy while living in 600 square foot walk-up studio apartment.

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TO PFMB,

What you need in a hunting companion, is a different, than what the vast bulk of dog owners need. Most humans in USA are looking for companion pets, not hunting dogs. (your lucky, lucky dogs!! how wonderful!! Wish more dogs DID get something to do)

Your reasons for choosing the dogs you choose, all seem rational to me.

still, a rescue dog can do those things, too, my border collie actually trees squirrels, raccoons, whatever,

and will stay there and bark til someone comes. (but, my dog is never out for days at a pop, never, couldn't promise he'd stay there for "days")

But, you are right, no way to be 100% sure the bluetick hound you choose from petfinders, will do this, but, it IS typical for that breed to do that behavior, and many many many other dogs also do this.

Re: the fence requirement for a housepet, you could consider going to another facility on petfinder than the one in your town, or, asking to talk to the facility manager, and in respectful way, negotiate that out. Can be done now and then.

Or, if you really feel your dogs are safe without a fenced in yard, (which you seem to feel is true) you could check the box for fence. Not all rules:no: are rational, imo.

also, awesome to cross paths with someone who realizes, that having the AKC "recognize" a breed, is not usually good for that breed's overall health or function.

PS---re having your word bleeped out, same thing happened to me on another thread about dogs, i later came to realize, it is some "automatic" thing done on AN. Probably a built in safeguard for a website with a bazillion members..

Edited by somenurse

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We also ran into the issue of many independently run rescue orgs and even a few humane societies not wanting to let us adopt because we lived in an apartment. ("You no want cat?") We were looking for a small to medium sized, low-energy dog (preferably older) but from the way we were treated, you could have assumed that we wanted a lab puppy while living in 600 square foot walk-up studio apartment.

I believe you. I know this happens, and i loathe hearing about these types of what i call "dog nazis". I am really sorry this happened, and sometimes, one can look to another nearby facility, on Petfinders (usually, more than one org will show up for any zip code you enter)

or, search out another person (higher or lower) of that org, to help you be heard.

Especially admirable you are interested in an older dog, so few humans are able to see the value and joy an older dog can offer, i wish you the best of luck. Don't give up, you sound like a human some lucky dog would be lucky to live with.

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Ps---slightly off topic, but PFMB, mentions in his wish list for a companion dog for his children, that one of the things he'd want in a pet for his kids, is a dog that barks for strangers arriving. Most dogs do that naturally, if not first week, will begin to do so their 2nd week in a new home.

If not (my dog didn't....:rolleyes:)

a dog CAN be trained to do that, is not hard at all to teach a dog to do that. Anyone who wants step by step instructions to teach your dog to bark for guests arriving, PM me, i'll send you the instructions. Only takes a few lessons, actually.

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So where do shelter dogs come from? Why are they better then a well bred dog from an ethical breeder? How do ethical breeders contribute to the "over population problem"?

Fuzzy

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Our current shelter dog was turned in by his family afterforclosure. The moved to an apartment that didn't allow pets.

He is only 40 pounds, but really active so really should have a yard.

Another dog we got at the shelter was rescued from being chained to a fence, one's owner had died, one had been found as a stray.

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I believe you. I know this happens, and i loathe hearing about these types of what i call "dog nazis". I am really sorry this happened, and sometimes, one can look to another nearby facility, on Petfinders (usually, more than one org will show up for any zip code you enter)

or, search out another person (higher or lower) of that org, to help you be heard.

Especially admirable you are interested in an older dog, so few humans are able to see the value and joy an older dog can offer, i wish you the best of luck. Don't give up, you sound like a human some lucky dog would be lucky to live with.

Eh. No worries. We ended up adopting from a local prison dog program -- they take in dogs who are about to be euthanized at high-risk county shelters AND give inmates potentially marketable skills.

Annie's been with us for over five years and now has a very large, fenced in back yard to roam as we bought our first house two years ago.

Still get the occasional snide comment from strangers about adopting - she's a designer breed that was popular a few years ago - but you can't win them all I guess.

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So where do shelter dogs come from? Why are they better then a well bred dog from an ethical breeder? How do ethical breeders contribute to the "over population problem"?

Fuzzy

Well, why buy a companion dog from a breeder?

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Eh. No worries. We ended up adopting from a local prison dog program -- they take in dogs who are about to be euthanized at high-risk county shelters AND give inmates potentially marketable skills.

Annie's been with us for over five years and now has a very large, fenced in back yard to roam as we bought our first house two years ago.

Still get the occasional snide comment from strangers about adopting - she's a designer breed that was popular a few years ago - but you can't win them all I guess.

Ah, like i always say, show me a breed who is NOT a designer dog. (more on that line of thought, in reply #7 and reply #11.) ALL purebreds are designed dogs,

all of 'em. Dingos are natural dogs, and when you take purebreds, and set them free into the wild, within mere generations, they begin to revert to a more dingo like shape. This is true of most creatures that we humans have messed with, like pigs begin to revert back to boars, and cows become less helpless, etc etc.

But, it does crack me up, to hear someone holding a chihuahua or a pug or german shepherd, or dachsund, or ANY BREED of dog,

call the goldendoodle a "designer" dog!!:roflmao:

At least, with many of the newest designer dogs, there was at the least, an actual rational reason for creating the breed, often to help kids with allergies have a way to adopt a pet, or to reduce the shedding.

(admittedly, not all oodles are less likely to cause allergic reactions, and admittedly, not all the newest breeds have any rational reason behind the effort, but, *some* of the new breeds DO have rational reason behind the efforts.) And few of the newest breeds have been taken to the extremes many of our purebreeds have taken to. shiver!!

and GOOD ON YOU, for persisting to find a dog to give a home to!! Bet your dog is one lucky dog!!

Edited by somenurse

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