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Dementia: A Punishment

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You are reading page 2 of Dementia: A Punishment. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

I haven't heard the 'punishment' theory - or the prisons would be overwhelmed.

But the intelligence theory is a different story. Here is one 'explanation'.

You need to boil water. You have some options. Electric burner, gas burner, microwave oven, wood fire. And others.

That is how your brain works, with different connections to get to the same place. If we have not developed those connections then there are fewer ways to reach those areas.

So when the brain begins to break down it becomes more obvious in those people with fewer connections.

The more intelligent among us may be protected for a while, but certainly not permanently.

But punishment? It's the families who are punished, not the patients.

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My view?

Dementia is the progressive deteoriation in cognitive function. It can be triggered by damage to the brain, various diseases and infections, head injuries, drugs, or nutritional deficiencies.

It is linked to bad diet, brain/mind inactivity, poor diet, and depression.....

I don't think it's a punishment to the person, or that there's some spiritual meaning behind it. It can affect anyone!

It's also hard for me to think that my best buddy in the nursing home was diagnosed with it as a punishment....or that some greater power gave it to her to "get back at her" for something she did in her younger life....

But respectively, this is just MY view....it's how I look at dementia...:)

(Whew!! Good thing I did a report on this last semester!!!:) )

God bless you all :redbeathe

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Dementia is a feared disease. It is the very last disease people wish to be afflicted by. Almost anything is preferable to the loss of identity that accompanies dementia.

At the same time, many nurses view it as inevitable or an affliction that affects only those of a certain identity or character. That is the heart of what this very spiritual discussion is about.

there are many illnesses that can be veiwed as an affliction, cancer, aids, copd to name a few, where people feel they are being punished. i would try not to pass judgement as to what type of person someone was prior to diagnosis. the art of nursing shouldnt be in judging someones past, but in the impact/difference you as a nurse will have in that patients like today. judge not, lest ye be judged.:)

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Good replies all. What do you think might help determine what causes someone demented individuals to be angry, mistrustful, combative types?Could it be tied to their nature and personality prior to the disease? Likewise, why are some pleasantly confused instead of being angry confused?

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Good replies all. What do you think might help determine what causes someone demented individuals to be angry, mistrustful, combative types?Could it be tied to their nature and personality prior to the disease? Likewise, why are some pleasantly confused instead of being angry confused?

My studies on the subject show some of the differences to be related to the particular, specific, anatomical as well as physiological part of the brain that is attacked.

I don't think we can read into this research too much. Perhaps some of the folks with lower IQs had underlying vascular issues that went undetected. I also believe there is research to show that those with some genetic mutations show dementia earlier. Perhaps many of those with lower IQs were in jobs that placed them with solvents containing benzene that are known to destroy brain cells. There are too many "perhaps" issues to take this as more than, Hmmm, interesting.

As to the idea that dementia is a punishment sent by God? Is this just another way insurance companies will try to not have to pay? I really find it hard to believe that people in health care actually believe this, especially when they see so many nurses in Alz. units. Some of these older nurses were the most caring and best nurses. I do understand that in some religions humans are seen as totally wicked and undeserving. I have a hard time wrapping my head around seeing many people in HC who carry these notions.

Even a quick look at ALZ.org should help to sort out some facts.

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Who taught you that dementia was a punishment? That's just.... delusional.

I'm still a nursing student, and not an expert by any means, but I've read a fair amount about dementia. I read that one way to prevent dementia symptoms is to use what you've learned and continue to learn new things. When the brain is constantly making new synaptic connections, it can prevent the confusion and memory loss associated with dementia. For example, someone who does crossword puzzles or learns how to use a computer is forced to recall information they've learned and use it in a new way. This causes another "route" or "highway" to be built or remain open in the brain (neuronal circuitry) which then helps the brain to avoid having areas that have fallen to disuse. Basically "use it or lose it" aka brain plasticity.

Now if someone has a low IQ, or they grew up impoverished during childhood and didn't get a good education, when they are older they are going to have less information to draw on for recall. They're not going to be able to apply things they've learned to new situations, because their knowledge database was lacking in the first place. Someone who was forced to go to work at a mundane or laborious job at a young age, and that's all they did their whole life, is going to be more likely to develop dementia because they stopped learning new things. Compare that to someone who had a higher IQ and came from a higher socioeconomic class - they went to college, traveled, perhaps sought out new experiences into their old age.

And then there are environmental factors as well. People with low IQ are more likely to use substances out of frustration, watch television instead of reading a book, eat food that is not of optimum nutrition, etc. I'm not saying that intelligent people don't also have these problems, but I don't think I'm wrong to assume the correlation between low IQ and poor choices regarding environmental factors. JMO, please don't rage at the sweeping generalizations I've just made :)

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Who taught you that dementia was a punishment? That's just.... delusional.

I'm still a nursing student, and not an expert by any means, but I've read a fair amount about dementia. I read that one way to prevent dementia symptoms is to use what you've learned and continue to learn new things. When the brain is constantly making new synaptic connections, it can prevent the confusion and memory loss associated with dementia. For example, someone who does crossword puzzles or learns how to use a computer is forced to recall information they've learned and use it in a new way. This causes another "route" or "highway" to be built or remain open in the brain (neuronal circuitry) which then helps the brain to avoid having areas that have fallen to disuse. Basically "use it or lose it" aka brain plasticity.

Now if someone has a low IQ, or they grew up impoverished during childhood and didn't get a good education, when they are older they are going to have less information to draw on for recall. They're not going to be able to apply things they've learned to new situations, because their knowledge database was lacking in the first place. Someone who was forced to go to work at a mundane or laborious job at a young age, and that's all they did their whole life, is going to be more likely to develop dementia because they stopped learning new things. Compare that to someone who had a higher IQ and came from a higher socioeconomic class - they went to college, traveled, perhaps sought out new experiences into their old age.

And then there are environmental factors as well. People with low IQ are more likely to use substances out of frustration, watch television instead of reading a book, eat food that is not of optimum nutrition, etc. I'm not saying that intelligent people don't also have these problems, but I don't think I'm wrong to assume the correlation between low IQ and poor choices regarding environmental factors. JMO, please don't rage at the sweeping generalizations I've just made :)

I think they are all valid points. Good thinking.

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OP, don't believe for one minute that you are a healthcare professional. I think you have some kind of personal agenda that you should take elsewhere.

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Thread closed for admin review.

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