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Can a fat nurse be a good nurse?

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Wow... hate much? :eek:

Funny part is this: The people who tend to be the most aggressively critical of overweight people are............you got it.......overweight people. And not in a "I hate myself thus I hate other overweight people" way. I mean.......in a way like:

Anorexic people chuckle at skinny people

Skinny people get a kick out of average sized people

Avg. sized people make fun of slightly overweight people

Slightly overweight people are critical of overweight people

Overweight people are vicious towards obese people

Obese people are marauders of extremely obese people

Notice a trend?

It is true though. The people who I tend to see being vicious about other's overweight problems are........bigger people, not healthy people.

I used to know a guy who hung out at the local bar. This guy had a weight problem, and not a little one (no pun intended). His gut.........well, he could fold it under and sit on it.......it was that far bellow his knees.

He'd drink cola and eat w/e at the bar AND MAKE FUN OF THE LARGE WOMEN IN THE BAR. It was like.........every single girl who can in that was not petite was.......desperate for sex and attention, had no values, would put up with any kind of treatment they got if you paid them a little attention and told them they were pretty. The guy AMAZED me with his...........denial of his own situation.

W/E it takes to get you mind off your worries and get through the day I guess.

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Anyone who is overweight deserves the same amount of compassion, respect and has just as much integrity as any other professional or human being. It is important to extend respect to our overweight friends, while also supporting them in healthy choices (without being a$$H0#@! about it). Let's face it...the majority of obesity in out country is not related to thyroid issues, leptin imbalances etc, but is the result of people eating food, that...well, isn't really good, nutritious food, living on cortisol (cuz nurses know nothin about stress...), and not getting enough exercise. I admit, if my nurse in cardiac surgery is clinically obese, chowing down a big mac and telling me that i have to loose weight to get better, s/he is bound to lose some professional credability.

Why would a nurse be "chowing down a Big Mac" in front of a patient at all? Would it be alright if a skinny nurse was chowing down a Big Mac?

BUT, my friends who are overweight and working hard on it are also SUPER inspiring caretakers.

We're all human, and we're most effective when we walk the talk.

Do your overweight friends tell their patients they are "working hard on it?" They must be in order to be an inspiring caretaker rather than an inspiring person.

Of course the "walk the talk" issue makes sense - but only if the person hearing information about their own health decides on his own to factor what the nurse does with her life into whether or not they will choose to take the information offered and relate it to their own health. If they have the thought "why should I do anything that nurse said because she is fat?" you have to wonder how seriously they take their responsibility for making changes in their own lives as well.

I realize that probably sounds nit-picky but I do not believe a nurse should be judged that way, period. If other people want to use a fat nurse as an excuse not to take care of themselves that is not his or her problem.

If one cannot perform their duties on the job - that is fair to bring up, but just as with the 83 year old nurse in another thread--- judge on the task performance and not the age (or the weight).

Edited by nursel56

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When I was in the hospital, either inpatient or for the IV chemo, last year some of the nurses were overweight- and outstanding nurses.

I'm overweight- and gained more with the chemo combination I'm on (and am horrified). I spent most of my childhood, adolescence, and young adult years either on forced diets/restricting as a child, or starvation diets as I got older...all that did was pack on more weight when I went back to actual meals, and screwed up a lot more than it helped.

I'm so glad I don't know IRL who the people here are who are so hateful towards those who don't fit into a neat little "normal weight" category.... and incredibly thankful for the overweight nurses (and patient care techs) who were so kind, competent, and caring when I've been in the hospital- very thankful the 'judges' weren't my nurses....

Compassion can't be taught...

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Hospital cafeterias have vending machines full of unhealthy junk food. I suppose the whole hospital should be shut down, eh?

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What I find literally amazing is all the overweight nurses, addict nurses asking for (insisting, demanding ....whatever) compassion for their "disease" by the majority of them are judgmental of the smokers. Can we say hypocrisy? There is as much genetic susceptibility to addictions (regardless of substance) as their is to being overweight. Where is your compassion for the smokers?

I *know* what is like to be overweight and go thru dieting. It is miserable! I, however, lost all my excess weight after the birth of my first child and maintained low weight through my life until peri-menopause. I gained weight until I was 135 closing in on 140....and I went out and bought a road bicycle. I am down to 125.

And YES, I smoke. Do you know that studies show that 85% of smokers DON'T get cancer? So yes, those who are genetically susceptible, will get cancer if they smoke.

I spent my "thin" years eating whatever I wanted. The issue was not what I ate, but the quantity. (ie: calories) When I stopped doing the diet soda, rabbit food thing and ate SMALL quantities of what I enjoyed, I lost over 60 lbs.

Can a fat nurse be a good nurse. YES! Can a smoker be a good nurse? YES! The vast majority of hospitals do not allow smoking on their grounds. I did not smoke at all during the clinical 12 hour shifts. I did smoke at home and OUTSIDE.

We ALL make lifestyle choices. We who make some poor decisions will most likely suffer the consequences of those choices. Although there are a few diseases that pack on the pounds, the vast majority of overweight folks are overweight because of what they choose to eat and drink and what types of food consumed.

Honestly, I think this smoker vs obese type thread is like congress. Both sides feeling that their points are correct and neither side listening to the other and accusing each other of intolerance. Maybe we should all get to the point of being compassionate to all and stop the judgmentalism of all. In addition, we all must accept the consequences of our own actions.

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Funny part is this: The people who tend to be the most aggressively critical of overweight people are............you got it.......overweight people. And not in a "I hate myself thus I hate other overweight people" way. I mean.......in a way like:

Anorexic people chuckle at skinny people

Skinny people get a kick out of average sized people

Avg. sized people make fun of slightly overweight people

Slightly overweight people are critical of overweight people

Overweight people are vicious towards obese people

Obese people are marauders of extremely obese people

Notice a trend?

It is true though. The people who I tend to see being vicious about other's overweight problems are........bigger people, not healthy people.

I used to know a guy who hung out at the local bar. This guy had a weight problem, and not a little one (no pun intended). His gut.........well, he could fold it under and sit on it.......it was that far bellow his knees.

He'd drink cola and eat w/e at the bar AND MAKE FUN OF THE LARGE WOMEN IN THE BAR. It was like.........every single girl who can in that was not petite was.......desperate for sex and attention, had no values, would put up with any kind of treatment they got if you paid them a little attention and told them they were pretty. The guy AMAZED me with his...........denial of his own situation.

W/E it takes to get you mind off your worries and get through the day I guess.

Your story reminded me that I've had the exact same experience...only the setting was different. Back when I was still working for GM, there was this guy who was sloppily dressed with his belly hung over the top of his jeans. I observed him as he sat in a chair watching the women walk down the aisle, and he made rude comments to every women who didn't measure up to his standards in some way, either with looks or weight. I remember being so disgusted that I will never forget this.

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not ALL of the overweight nurses rag on smokers- don't lump me with them :) .... I used to smoke, and get it- it's incredibly difficult to quit. I had multiple pulmonary emboli, or I'd probably still be smoking- to EAT LESS (lol)....

I agree with one of the posters a while back.. I think this was started to anger people. Not sure it deserves any more of my attention. Haters will always hate- until, God forbid, they turn into what they hate (and people do), then they can't back-pedal fast enough. :)

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The original question is listed as "Can a fat nurse be a good nurse?"

But further clarification of the question would be:

"Can a fat nurse function

as a patient educator

and promote healthy lifestyles,

when the nurse does not appear to be living them?"

Yes, depending how the nurse approaches the subject!

I am old, overweight, addicted to Diet Pepsi, & avoid exercise if at all possible (except 4-5 12hr shifts...hehehe).

How can I give patients counsel about improving their health? I do every day!

Ex. We are to ask our patients if they smoke cigarettes...and if they do, we are to encourage them to stop,

right? Well, I ask them if they smoke. If they say yes, I ask how much (as per the question's prompting on the admission sheet). I then ask them if they are aware that smoking is bad for their health and the health of those around them. They of course answer, "Yes" and typically start to get defensive. I then acknowledge that the jump from understanding that something is bad for ourselves to doing something about it is a huge leap! I point out that I understand how difficult it is to make life changes that are good for us. I then offer them resources for quitting.

Ex. I work in L&D. We ask our patients if they are taking their prenatal vitamins. If they don't, a nurse's natural reaction might be to yell at them or tell them how they aren't taking care of their baby very well. Instead, I ask why not. Most often it is because the pills are huge or because they upset the patient's stomach. I can then make suggestions like, taking vitamins at bedtime or trying chewable vitamins instead of large tablets.

Yes, I can do patient education as an overweight, out-of-shape nurse!

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Can a fat nurse be a good nurse?

Many of the replies were discussing obesity as to whether obesity interferes with being a good nurse.

Many of the replies discussed the challenges and causes of obesity.

I don't think either of those subjects were really part of the original discussion!

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not all of the overweight nurses rag on smokers- don't lump me with them :) .... i used to smoke, and get it- it's incredibly difficult to quit. i had multiple pulmonary emboli, or i'd probably still be smoking- to eat less (lol)....

i agree with one of the posters a while back.. i think this was started to anger people. not sure it deserves any more of my attention. haters will always hate- until, god forbid, they turn into what they hate (and people do), then they can't back-pedal fast enough. :)

reminds me of my brother in law. racist man if i've ever seen one. spent entire nights trying to convince me black people were what is wrong with america.

1. they don't want to work for a living, will give up on a job the second it gets difficult.

never mind he refused to work at all after he lost his nice union job.............they wanted him to do too much for too little. borrowing of your in-laws is so much more respectable. didn't work for close to a year.

2. they clog up the welfare system and have kids just to raise their public assistance benefits.

somehow, he and my sister having kids while in the midst of having their electric shut off, a home foreclosed on and rely on my parents good nature to put food on the table is different though.

3. they are like children with their loud cars with the speakers in the back. toys, thats all life is to them, getting more toys. they never grow up.

yeah......kinda like they guy who's phone is shut off because they didn't pay the bill going to rent-a-center for a 60 inch tv. oh.........wait...........that's him.

i could go on and on about the double standards he represented. he was like the guy i described in the post above.........in total denial of his own situation. i did point out the double standards to him on a few occasions. now he has moved on to hating rich folk.

like you said, haters will keep on hating. and like i said, its not about what stick they choose to beat people over the head with, they just need to beat someone over the head.

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Nearly 40 years ago,I sstarted nursing school weighing about 120 lbs.

During a very bad 2 yr marriage, I put on about 30 lbs. and eventually got rid of 250 lbs. The 30, plus the 220 lb husband.

In my late 30's I had a very bad time with asthma, and multiple courses of steroids led to a 60 lb weight gain in about a year. Depression didn't help, more weight gain.

At 40, after my 2nd child, nothing seemed right with my body. More weight gain, more depression. It took EIGHT years to get a dx of PCOS. But I did not understand the link between PCOS and diabetes. Oh, and a major asthma attack, and more steroids led me right into Diabetes....

BTW - many diabetes meds CAUSE weight gain!!!

So as hard as I try, it can be very difficult to look in the mirror sometimes. Very hard. But I have always felt that I was an excellent nurse.

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Okay first post said there is no relationship between diabetes and obesity?? I highly disagree and would like for you to post this information for reference. And yes a "fat" nurse can be a good nurse. Yes we promote health and wellness, but we are also human beings and cannot be perfect. And some people who others view as "fat" are actually quite active and healthy. Obese is another story, when someone is actually medically considered obese its a major health problem.

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