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As a first generation American..

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An opinion written during the 2016 election:

Quote

An American Mussolini

The GOP front-runner's calls for violence against his critics are no joke.

Despite the incendiary tone of his rhetoric — that all Muslims are our enemies, that Mexicans are rapists and drug dealers, and that practically anybody who disagrees with him is an ISIS supporter or a “socialist” — Trump refuses to take responsibility for the violence he incites among his followers.

Indeed, he told NBC’s Chuck Todd that he wasn’t condoning violence, not even when he told a crowd shouting down a protester, “I’d like to punch him in the face.” Darker still was Trump’s reminiscing, “I love the old days — you know what they used to do to guys like that when they were in a place like this? They’d be carried out on a stretcher, folks.”

Similarly, Trump said at an earlier rally that if supporters saw anybody with a tomato, “Knock the crap out of them, would you? Seriously. OK? Just knock the hell [out of them]. I promise you I will pay for the legal fees.”

Combined with his offer to pay the legal fees of a supporter who assaulted a peaceful Black Lives Matter activist, that’s a blank check for violence.

The American body politic certainly has seen demagogues in the past. Former Alabama governor George Wallace, who ran for president in 1968, 1972, and 1976, comes to mind immediately. Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, who ran for multiple state and federal offices in the 1980s and ‘90s (and has since thrown his support to Trump), similarly attracted fringe elements to his rallies.

But violence at American political rallies has never been acceptable, especially violence encouraged by the candidate. That’s why comparisons of Trump with other American demagogues aren’t an easy fit...

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2016/03/16/american-mussolini 

 

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6 minutes ago, herring_RN said:

An opinion written during the 2016 election:

 

😀😀 Great minds think alike. 🤣🤣

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1 hour ago, KonichiwaRN said:

Pretty weird. ANTIFA group reminds me of European History..exactly what the goons of Mussolini has done.

Further to this comment, remember I am European educated in Scotland at a time when Scottish education was the best in the world. I learned about the history of the "brown shirts," the "black shirts" and Mussolini at a time when these things were still pretty fresh in everyone's memory. 

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3 hours ago, KonichiwaRN said:

 

I can't think of a single instance where the "opposition group (whomever. who cares)" isn't a "non-conservative" though.

 

Pretty weird. ANTIFA group reminds me of European History..exactly what the goons of Mussolini has done.

Probably true.  Public universities and colleges probably tend to be a little bit more liberal.  This was definitely true when I went to UNC in Chapel Hill, NC, a very conservative state, but the university even had a black student union and a gay student union way back in 1977.

ANTIFA has a right to exist in free America.  The good news is that Americans are also pretty good at fighting back and using their own free speech against the extremes on both sides and at each other.

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21 minutes ago, Tweety said:

Probably true.  Public universities and colleges probably tend to be a little bit more liberal.  This was definitely true when I went to UNC in Chapel Hill, NC, a very conservative state, but the university even had a black student union and a gay student union way back in 1977.

ANTIFA has a right to exist in free America.  The good news is that Americans are also pretty good at fighting back and using their own free speech against the extremes on both sides and at each other.

Agreed.

The main thing that also leads me to vote for the "hated side these days," is the rhetoric of

 

-silence speech that you disagree with movement.

 

It seems to be the dominant force these days. Like another poster placed, we resolve issues through debate. Not violence.

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2 hours ago, GrumpyRN said:

😀😀 Great minds think alike. 🤣🤣

Actions speak louder than words Grumpy.

Notice the burning of Berkeley California, at a innocent(?) university campus when a speaker was showing up.

 

Maybe if you were an American, you'd understand our values here. We support the Constitution, and all our laws and rules are derived from the Constitution.

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13 minutes ago, KonichiwaRN said:

Agreed.

The main thing that also leads me to vote for the "hated side these days," is the rhetoric of

-silence speech that you disagree with movement.

It seems to be the dominant force these days. Like another poster placed, we resolve issues through debate. Not violence.

Fair enough.  I can't tell you how to view the world.

I agree that violence to silence others isn't the answer.  In my opinion it doesn't happen all that often.  Perhaps yes a speaker for security reasons may be denied a speech somewhere so I won't belabor that point.  However, there are plenty of platforms that such people get their message out.  In fact the very act of being denied speaking at a university gives them publicity that they take advantage of.

Trump was very effective in getting his message across and wasn't silenced. The people that opposed Obamacare showed up en mass to disrupt his town hall meetings.   People show up and protest at Trump rallies.  Much of this is peaceful use of free speech but I don't always like it.  I say let the other side say their piece and you say yours and don't heckle.

The day after Trumps inauguration millions marched all across the globe.  This is what freedom and democracy looks like.  People aren't silenced.  We are free.

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Tweety said:

Fair enough.  I can't tell you how to view the world.

I agree that violence to silence others isn't the answer.  In my opinion it doesn't happen all that often.  Perhaps yes a speaker for security reasons may be denied a speech somewhere so I won't belabor that point.  However, there are plenty of platforms that such people get their message out.  In fact the very act of being denied speaking at a university gives them publicity that they take advantage of.

Trump was very effective in getting his message across and wasn't silenced. The people that opposed Obamacare showed up en mass to disrupt his town hall meetings.   People show up and protest at Trump rallies.  Much of this is peaceful use of free speech but I don't always like it.  I say let the other side say their piece and you say yours and don't heckle.

The day after Trumps inauguration millions marched all across the globe.  This is what freedom and democracy looks like.  People aren't silenced.  We are free.

 

 

 

Yes. The "right" to assemble peacefully, is one of our rights that we practice as citizens.

The trouble begins when people start interpreting rights within their own minds. Why do we even have a Supreme Court? Not only does it balance the government, but their sole purpose is to interpret the law.

The "right to free speech," does not enable a person to enter a private residence or to talk at a privately held event (example: Trump rallies or the speech by Bernie Sanders).

 

They are teaching something seriously wrong in this nation it seems. People are gathering the idea where "what they think = truth & the law."

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4 hours ago, KonichiwaRN said:

The University reserves the right to ban a person/group whatever to go there. 

However, some criteria needs to be looked at.

a) public or private

b) is there a population group that invited those speakers

c) is there a space that has been reserved

 

Basically, what I see is this.

a) group of population in the school/college invited the "whomever."

b) they have the space reserved

c) the opposition (whomever. who cares) group starts burning and breaking stuff, and even barring the entrances of those buildings.

 

I can't think of a single instance where the "opposition group (whomever. who cares)" isn't a "non-conservative" though.

 

Pretty weird. ANTIFA group reminds me of European History..exactly what the goons of Mussolini has done.

Really?

What about those White Nationalist "goons," to use your word, at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville?

You know, the very folks Trump has defended.

Carrying tiki torches, akin to the KKK, is pretty goonish to me.

And of course, driving a car into a crowd of peaceful protesters is the ultimate way to silence your critics, isn't it.

 

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35 minutes ago, KonichiwaRN said:

Actions speak louder than words Grumpy.

Notice the burning of Berkeley California, at a innocent(?) university campus when a speaker was showing up.

 

Maybe if you were an American, you'd understand our values here. We support the Constitution, and all our laws and rules are derived from the Constitution.

Berkeley, CA has not burned.

You are mistaken.

Paradise, CA burned, but not Berkeley.

Who told you Berkeley burned?

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4 hours ago, KonichiwaRN said:

Is the U.S.A is still practicing the draconian style tactics used in those days that you used to explain your thoughts about "free speech?"

I have no idea what you are talking about.

 

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