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AngelfireRN AngelfireRN (New Member) New Member

And this was SUPPOSED to be my vacation!!

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You are reading page 5 of And this was SUPPOSED to be my vacation!!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

You have the right to be angry at the "speed" of your care, but you should have stayed put and let them care for you without all the extra stress you put on yourself. Glad to hear that you are all better now!

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Being sick and scared and away from home is a bad combo. Everyone's instinct would be to run and get home because that's where we feel safest. I have no doubt panic set in and it was multipled because you were seriously ill.

It doesn't sound like your care was up to par as you waited way too long and should have been moved to another department but thankfully you are okay and made it through. That's what is most important in the end.

Hopefully the woman who took your call learned a lesson and will be sure to forward calls or messages in the future.

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Sounds like you felt like you weren't a part of the decision-making process, and due to your background you wanted to be able to make your own choices. Perhaps its this loss of control that made you feel "trapped".

In my opinion, I don't think its reasonable to expect a 400 mile transfer.

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I hope you get better and I think I would have panicked as well if I were in that situation...Again...Get better...;)

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Sounds like you felt like you weren't a part of the decision-making process, and due to your background you wanted to be able to make your own choices. Perhaps its this loss of control that made you feel "trapped".

In my opinion, I don't think its reasonable to expect a 400 mile transfer.

You got it, trapped, scared, and stressed. And reasonable or not, since we were footing the bill, had the helicopter ready and at our disposal, and a crew to go with it that VOLUNTEERED to come get me when they heard what happened, if that was what was wanted, and it was feasible, I feel that it should have been considered.

As it was, once I decided to stay, I had to call off the copter myself, it had been such an ordeal with the hospital not letting me leave, the crew thought they were MAKING me say that I did not want them to come. My mother, to this day, says that she wishes she had flown down to get me.

But, it's over, it's done, and I survived by the grace of God. Or, in my husband's opinion, because the Devil did not want the competition.:D

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what would you have done if this was a patient you were taking care of......would you have told her to stay.

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what would you have done if this was a patient you were taking care of......would you have told her to stay.

It depends on the circumstance, I guess. By the time they got around to getting me to the floor, it had been about 9 hours since I arrived at the ER. The nurse agreed that, were it her, she'd sign out, too. Her solution was this, let her draw a H&H. If it was stable, I would go. If not, I would stay. It went from 9.7 to 7.1. I stayed. In the ER, had I called for the chopper, it could have been there in an hour and a half. I'd have been back home, at my hospital, and probably transfused (they were going to start that in-flight) before I got to the floor in Florida.

I would have to say, if the patient were a nurse, soon-to-be NP, she was stable (I was not orthostatic by then) and she had the means to get herself to the facility that she felt comfortable being at, especially when she was 400 miles from home, I'd consider it. I's counsel her, like they did me, but I'd try to put myself in her place and not be a twit about it, like some of them were.

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But would you rather code in the hospital, or in the helicopter with 1 hr to go in the transfer?

I have transfered patients to other facilites based on preference, but it was just an ambu drive away and was in-town. I've also transfered patients that were unstable to other facilities that could provide a higher level of care (such as a trauma 1 facilty).

I just don't know how it would legally work out if you were unstable and wanting a transfer due to patient preference, but the trip was 400 miles. What if you coded during transfer? Would the ED doc be held accountable for transfering an unstable patient when the services needed could have been provided at the initial facility? The only other option would be to sign out AMA, which you declined in the beginning.

I totally respect where you are coming from, and some type of middle-ground should have been reached. I know you didn't have any problems while you waited 12 hrs for your transfusion, but no one can read the future. I've had patients with GI bleeds sitting upright and talking one minute, only to code moments later. I was just talking about GI bleeds today with a collegue: I hate them - not because of what I need to do to provide care, but because they are so unpredictable and can crash really fast...really REALLY fast...

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Angelfire - First, Let me tell you how sorry I am to hear that happened to you. That is horrible, and to be so far from home. I do hope you are feeling better.

Now, my nursing brain cells would have told me - "Stay where you are and let them do their thing.

And, MY brain cells would have told me --- "Dad, what time is the helicopter landing? Are you sure you can't come any earlier?"

Anne, RNC

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Oh, my nursing brain cells died right after I told my husband to call the ambulance. If you read my post about the ulcer and events preceding, I threw up blood (not good), passed out on my husband (freaked him out, the last thing I heard was him saying "Baby, what're you gonna pass out for?"), and then passed out COLD on the throne in the bathroom (my husband has never seen true syncope, my hands were twisting, he told me I had a seizure, to get in the truck, we were going home). Yeah. He told me later that the scriest thing for hime was not me passing out or the syncope, but the fact that I was so darn calm..."Baby, if I had a seizure, we need an ambulance."

He kept on trying to get me up, convinced that if he could get me to walk, I'd be OK. But what scared him was that, when I saw how scared he was, I went "dead calm", as he put it. Didn't get excited, didn't yell, just explained in a slow calm voice why we needed an ambulance, why the truck wasn't a good idea, and, after the paramedics got there, why he needed to let THEM carry me down the stairs. He literally thought I was in that "bright light state", cause any other time, I'd have been in a tis-was.

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Of course, when we got my counts back at the ER (9.7 and 27.7) and he called my father to say, "Yeah they said she ain't got but 9 pints of blood left in her body", I managed a "No, **** it!" At that point, he said, "Well, she's better enough to cuss at me, I think she'll live".

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I vote for the 'not enough blood perfusing your brain' theory :sstrs: I'm glad you eventually got the care you needed. =)

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