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DoGoodThenGo DoGoodThenGo (New Member) New Member

And The Award For The Most Wacky Nurse's Cap

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You are reading page 2 of And The Award For The Most Wacky Nurse's Cap. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Hey DoGood - double dares go first! Honestly, I like that cap ... not for $125 + but I do think it's neat. And I would have worn it when I wore my 'flying nun' cap with its ever-changing ribbons and cap tacks back in the day.

I actually wore a Mr. Coffee fillter one shift. We had an old European MD who would only review his orders with the 'REAL NURSE' who wore her cap. He'd seek out anybody with a cap (and the poor LPNs usually got nailed). That day, I needed his input so I just grabbed the coffee fillter. Those were the days ...:rotfl:

HAHAHAH Thanks for the laugh! The picture in my brain of that just cracked me up!

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HAHAHAH Thanks for the laugh! The picture in my brain of that just cracked me up!
I do like that square cap and other big nsg caps! I also like real dress hats - think, Kentucky Derby and the English royals!

To DoGood - I attended a local comm college AD program. My cap from them was a dark green-striped short 'coronet' (like the Pope's) with a soft flloooofy back that wouldn't stay pinned on. It fell off in a code (REALLY!) and nsg supervisor lit into me about the dress code. I really didn't care for my cap for that reason.

So I went and ordered one from a catalogue - something like the one on #9 post. I flared the wing ends out so far, it wouldn't fit in the little cap case. It was huge! And I would change its stripe(s) every week (a big 1" red stripe, 2 narrow horizontal black ones, one royal blue continous one up, down & across the edge, diagonals on the wing tips (1 or 2 on one or both of the tips), etc. The dress code only required "a cap" and "a school pin". I wore my school pin, but I got nsg admin on a technicality. Drove them nuts!

And DoGood, I worked with an LPN from St. Vinney's - she had the petite out-of-towner pin that I noticed. And she had excellent handwriting for her good nsg notes. (Must be that Catholic school stuff.)

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Words fail.

Granted, us west coast nurses don't have the rich nursing school history that you do back east, but I've never, in 37 years of exposure to nurses on a regular basis, seen anything quite like that. :) Thanks for sharing it, DGTG!

Seriously, though I'm such a vintage addict I'm afraid to hit those links . . .

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Attended a Catholic nsg program and also had a swooping flying-nun cap.......some folded it shallow so it swooped MORE and some folded it deep so it rose up like a column when they wore it on TOP of their head. I wore it shallow and hanging off the back of my head. If I turned fast in the elevator I could poke someones eye out. It also got caught on the curtains between beds alot. Don't know why I didn't change the manner in which I wore it except I thought the swoop was very cool! Felt sorry for the cupcake-cap wearers.

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Think all this nostalgia for vintage nursing items including caps is being driven by two camps. Those that remember and wish to preserve what they see as a vaild part of the history of the profession, and those who never got the chance to experience and want a taste. The latter probably would rise up in mass rebellion if ordered back into whites and caps, but now and then on their own terms they kind of like the idea.

Whites, caps and capes still have a powerful allure, especially for many today who were born long after such things were all but abandoned by most nurses. Will never forget the media coverage of Saint Vinny's last day when a graduate of that nursing school showed up for duty in her school cap, cape and white dress. The media pounced on a nurse wearing the "traditional garb" of a Saint Vincent's nurse. When asked why she wore her uniform the reply went along the lines of "it was from her graduation and now that the school AND the hospital were gone (or going) she wanted to honour the nearly 200 years St. Vinny's had been around. You just cannot argue with that! *LOL*

Then there is what I call the "Nurse Ratched" effect. Don't know why or how it works, but the sight of a whits and cap clad nurse causes many to stand a bit straighter and give less hassle.

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Attended a Catholic nsg program and also had a swooping flying-nun cap.......some folded it shallow so it swooped MORE and some folded it deep so it rose up like a column when they wore it on TOP of their head.

Mine was supposed to be worn perched on top of our head and was shaped kind of like a stealth bomber with circa 1961-sized Caddy fins. I thought it looked cuter farther back on my head but OH NO! :nono: They were very fussy about the positioning of it, too! It had to look as dorky as possible, I guess. :)

I remember my first clinical instructor being the first nurse I'd seen with the cupcake-cap, which amused me greatly as she had a military bearing and was built like a tank.

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Mine was supposed to be worn perched on top of our head and was shaped kind of like a stealth bomber with circa 1961-sized Caddy fins. I thought it looked cuter farther back on my head but OH NO! :nono: They were very fussy about the positioning of it, too! It had to look as dorky as possible, I guess. :)

I remember my first clinical instructor being the first nurse I'd seen with the cupcake-cap, which amused me greatly as she had a military bearing and was built like a tank.

Methinks the "cupcake/gauze" type caps grew out of the headgear worn during the Victorian era and subsequently schools that followed the Nightingale system of nursing education.

These caps would have been closer to the mob type caps orignally worn by women to keep their hair clean and more importantly for nursed keep whatever was on their heads (soils, dust, vermin, etc..) from potentially landing on a patient.

As sanitation and personal hygiene imporved such caps grew smaller to become more a decoration than useful.

Until Kay's and others came out with various "perma-starch" gauze caps they were a pain to launder, starch and iron properly. It required a certain type starch and ability to use goffering irons to return the caps to their proper frilled and stiff forms after washing. If done correctly however they would hold their shape and shed dirt/dust (thanks to the starch) for weeks of wearing.

One great thing about gauze type caps is they didn't always require a cap case. One just folded the thing flat (often placed in a book), and that was that. Am told Bellevue nurses and students were famous for this. *LOL*

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It's all really fascinating to me. I recall my one attempt to launder one of my caps. I figured I knew enough about laundering and starching that I could handle it despite being cautioned. I got the thing unbuttoned and soaked, laid flat and starched the hell out of it. I never got the texture of little wrinkles out of the fabric. It is kind of cool to see what their shapes are when laid flat, though.

Since then I've learned much more about how collars, caps and the like were laundered and the various stovetop concoctions that were used to stiffen the fabric. I was a rank piker at it, and have new respect for those who could make such perfect white creations by starching and pressing.

(vermin on their heads, yikes, lol!!!)

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(vermin on their heads, yikes, lol!!!)

By that comment one assumes you escaped the primary and seconday school humiliation of having the "Nit Nurse" examine your head for lice. :D

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It's all really fascinating to me. I recall my one attempt to launder one of my caps. I figured I knew enough about laundering and starching that I could handle it despite being cautioned. I got the thing unbuttoned and soaked, laid flat and starched the hell out of it. I never got the texture of little wrinkles out of the fabric. It is kind of cool to see what their shapes are when laid flat, though.

Since then I've learned much more about how collars, caps and the like were laundered and the various stovetop concoctions that were used to stiffen the fabric. I was a rank piker at it, and have new respect for those who could make such perfect white creations by starching and pressing.

(vermin on their heads, yikes, lol!!!)

There are three main types of starch used for laundry purposes, each with it's own unique properties. They are wheat, rice, corn and potato.

Depending upon the fabric (cotton or linen) and the results desired (soft, frim, stiff to downright ridgid) one used one or often a blend of two to get where one needed to go.

I can (and do) starch linens with what was once called "clear starching" and you'll never tell the fabric was treated. However the starch is there doing it's job; giving a slight gloss and body to the fabric as well as protection from soils.

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