More Than 10,000 Protest Move By Wisconsin's Governor to Destroy Public-Sector Unions

  1. 1 the state capitol was awash tuesday in protests as thousands gathered to voice opposition to a bill by gov. scott walker that would greatly weaken organized labor in wisconsin.

    more than 10,000 protesters crowded the southwest side of the capitol building, many of them carrying signs and chanting "recall walker." meanwhile, inside, thousands crowded the rotunda and watched tvs set up to broadcast the public hearing scheduled to discuss the governor's proposal.

    unveiled friday, walker's plan would remove collective bargaining rights for most of the 175,000 state and local employees, allowing workers to negotiate only over salary. walker, however, exempted most law enforcement, firefighters and wisconsin state patrol troopers from the change....

    ... on tuesday, members of the fire fighters union received a loud ovation from the crowd outside the capitol as they marched through holding signs that showed their solidarity with their fellow state and local employees....

    http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_de45ba12-3935-11e0-9b64-001cc4c002e0.html
  2. Visit  herring_RN profile page

    About herring_RN

    herring_RN has '>40 years' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical'. From 'California, USA'; Joined Mar '04; Posts: 14,003; Likes: 25,040.

    375 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Jolie profile page
    8
    Walker's only mistake was exempting police and firefighters from his proposal.

    There is absolutely no legitimate legal or moral reason for teachers or any other public sector employees to be paid lifelong benefits that far outpace anything the average citizen can command on the job, or realistically afford on his own. This is supposed to be a democracy, not a system of royal rule where the common masses sacrifice to support the chosen few. Entitlements paid to public sector employees are bankrupting cities and states, and it's got to stop.

    Good start, but Walker didn't go far enough.
    KristeyK, condanchri, camay1221_RN, and 5 others like this.
  4. Visit  herring_RN profile page
    0
    Did the police and firefighters create the financial crisis?
  5. Visit  herring_RN profile page
    1
    people fighting walker's plan remain at capitol
    thousands of labor supporters protest
    updated: 8:18 am cst february 16, 2011

    testimony has continued, even though the republican co-chairs of the joint finance committee technically wrapped up the hearing at 3 a.m.
    however, people that hadn't gotten the chance to speak didn't leave the building, pulling out sleeping bags in the rotunda and settling in. so, democratic lawmakers decided to stay at the capitol and listen until all people that wanted to testify had the chance to do so, allowing testimony to stretch more than 20 hours....

    http://www.channel3000.com/politics/...32/detail.html
    former, current packers back state unions - http://www.channel3000.com/politics/...42/detail.html

    rock county residents speak up about walker's decision - http://www.channel3000.com/news/26880677/detail.html

    rallies, vigils planned in response to gov. walker's proposals: state sen. erpenbach to hold listening session sunday - http://www.channel3000.com/politics/...38/detail.html

    eyewitness report: gop gov. walker's union busting scheme awakens 'sleeping giant' in wisconsin; 15,000 protest at state capital - http://american-idle.newsvine.com/_n...-state-capital
    mediajunkie650 likes this.
  6. Visit  herring_RN profile page
    0
    thousands protest anti-union bill in wisconsin
    ...some lawmakers are calling for amendments to the bill, but republicans, who control the legislature, are trying to get the bill passed unchanged by the end of the week....

    http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2...ion-wisconsin/
  7. Visit  herring_RN profile page
    0
    Labor packs Ohio Statehouse, protests union limits

    Feb 16, 2011
    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)-Hundreds of union protesters again packed the Statehouse in protest on Tuesday as government officials from around the state lined up in support of a bill that would wipe out Ohio's nearly 30-year-old collective bargaining law and make other union changes.

    A crowd of firefighters, police officers and other public employees overflowed the hearing room, packing cat walks and filling the Statehouse Atrium and Rotunda to standing-room-only capacity for much of the afternoon. It was the second week that hearings on the bill drew such crowds.

    The Senate bill, sponsored by Republican state Sen. Shannon Jones, would eliminate collective bargaining rights and salary schedules for public employees across the state. GOP Gov. John Kasich has expressed his support for the bill in concept, but he has also signaled he may bring forth his own plan that could go even further-including banning public employee strikes....

    ...At a union-sponsored press conference on the bill earlier Tuesday, Republican city worker Leo Geiger accused Kasich and other Republicans of attacking collective bargaining for political purposes.
    "It does nothing to help the budget woes because it's political payback for those who did not support them in the election," he said....

    Labor packs Ohio Statehouse, protests union limits - Bloomberg
  8. Visit  tntrn profile page
    1
    Quote from herring_RN
    Did the police and firefighters create the financial crisis?
    Not specifically, but the unions' agreements as to pensions is clearly a factor in how badly some states financial situation are. Illinois and California come to mind. I don't have specifics, but anytime a taxpayer-funded agreement includes retiring at 50 or 55 and the retiree's pension is as much as or even more than they made while actually working, it can and does create a negative cash flow problem for the state.
    KristeyK likes this.
  9. Visit  Tweety profile page
    0
    Quote from tntrn
    Not specifically, but the unions' agreements as to pensions is clearly a factor in how badly some states financial situation are. Illinois and California come to mind. I don't have specifics, but anytime a taxpayer-funded agreement includes retiring at 50 or 55 and the retiree's pension is as much as or even more than they made while actually working, it can and does create a negative cash flow problem for the state.
    Things definiately need to be looked at. Obviously when states paying the salaries and pension it's a negatitve cash flow, I don't see how one could expect a positive cash flow.

    At lot of teachers start teaching at age 21 and by the time they hit their 50's they are ready to retire from burnout and because they have that option. A lot of teachers retire to FL and it's rare that one works into his/her late 60's. Perhaps there should be an age requirement, rather than a time requirement.

    I know you're saying you don't have specifics but how can it be that their retirement incomes are higher than their income, unless it's because after 30 years of it equals more than what they make. I can see that happening, but I'm not sure how that works.

    We have the same issue in FL where the governor is proposing they pay for their own pensions plans, about 5% of their income. The sad thing is they haven't gotten a raise in years. Private pensions paid for by employers or the state have gone by the wayside years ago. I think it's time for public workers to make the same sacrifice as the rest of us. My employer-paid pension plan ended 15 years ago.

    Still, scapgoating entitlemenets to public sector employees as the reason states are bankrupt isn't fair. That's kind of like sayingn the reason healthcare is such a mess is because of "entitlements" paid to nurses. However, since it's public money it needs to be spent wisely, and these things need to be cut, along with everything else.
    Last edit by Tweety on Feb 17, '11
  10. Visit  tntrn profile page
    1
    Tweety, I should have said that it is a part of the cash flow problems for states.

    Just in: the Democratic Senators from Wisconsin are MIA for the vote they are to take today. Police are out looking for them. Without even one of them in attendance there can be no vote.

    Then there's the sign: I'd rather be teaching. I wonder if that is one of the thousands of teachers who called in sick today, or if it's a teacher who can't find a job. Fire all those who calleld in sick today and hire those who want to actually teach.
    Tweety likes this.
  11. Visit  tntrn profile page
    1
    Quote from Tweety
    At lot of teachers start teaching at age 21 and by the time they hit their 50's they are ready to retire from burnout and because they have that option. A lot of teachers retire to FL and it's rare that one works into his/her late 60's. Perhaps there should be an age requirement, rather than a time requirement.

    .
    If that's the argument they are using, then we could all use it. I mean, there are plenty of nurses who started nursing in their early 20's and are not working well past their 60's. So I don't see that as a valid argument.

    If you're burnt out, okay, but find another job. And the union language is partly at fault for this.

    Some of the kids who are also out on the streets of Madison WI, apparently don't even know why they are there, other than their teachers told them to be there and schools are closed. One of them didn't know the Governor's name. These kids really need another day out of the classroom.....not.

    I wonder how the parents feel about this. If my kid was a) not able to go to school because the teachers just decided to not work that day and b) then were told by the teachers to go "protest" AND I wasn't informed about, I'd be asking for some serious explanations by the teachers.

    I guess the School Superintendent is saying that teachers who called in sick will be required to provide a doctor's verification of that. Gonna be hard for those who are out there carrying signs and appearing on TV news casts.

    Not that I don't appreciate teachers....I do....my mom and one of my sisters were teachers. But this is the wrong fight to fight. If they believe in teaching so much, then get back into the classroom.
    Tweety likes this.
  12. Visit  herring_RN profile page
    0
    [color=#333333]the scene outside the state capitol in madison last night. protesters are back there today
    [color=#333333]
    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/...bill-on-unions
  13. Visit  herring_RN profile page
    0
    democrats missing from wisconsin capitol ahead of union vote

    police officers were dispatched thursday to find wisconsin state lawmakers who had apparently boycotted a vote on a sweeping bill that would strip most government workers of their collective bargaining rights.

    … republicans hold a 19-14 majority, but they need at least one democrat to be present before taking a vote on the bill.
    “today they checked out, and i'm not sure where they're at,” republican senate majority leader scott fitzgerald said. “this is the ultimate shutdown, what we're seeing today.”

    democratic minority leader mark miller released a statement on behalf of all democrats urging gov. scott walker and republicans to listen to opponents of the measure and seek a compromise. his statement did not address where democrats were or when they planned to return.

    bill opponents in the senate gallery cheered when senate president mike ellis announced that there were not enough senators present to proceed.
    the bill came to the senate after the legislature's budget committee endorsed it just before midnight wednesday.
    walker and republican leaders have said they have the votes to pass the plan.
    that didn't stop thousands of protesters from clogging the hallway outside the senate chamber beating on drums, holding signs deriding walker and pleading for lawmakers to kill the bill.

    http://www.superiortelegram.com/even...blisher_id/36/

    slide show - http://www.channel3000.com/slideshow...53/detail.html
    Last edit by herring_RN on Feb 17, '11
  14. Visit  Jolie profile page
    3
    Tweety,

    I can't speak for teachers, but I can explain how police and firefighters retire making more than they made during their working years. I live in Omaha, NE where years of exorbitant police and firefighter contracts are coming home to roost.

    First of all, the retirement age is as young as 45 here. Retirement pay is based upon the average of the last 3 years salary. The contracts were written to allow for "spiking," which means that the individual cashes out unused sick and vacation pay, as well as takes on as much OT as possible during that 3 year period to artifically inflate their pay during that key time period. (There is virtually no limit on accumulation of sick and vacation time, unlike the private sector, where we must use vacation time when earned, or lose it.) Thus their retirement pay is based upon wages far in excess of their base pay during that time. To add insult to injury, many of those who retire at the young age of 45-50 then embark on new careers, but decline the health care benefits offered by their new employers in order to continue their city-provided insurance at great cost to taxpayers.

    If this is happening in our relatively conservative small city, I am quite certain it has been going on for a long time elsewhere. It is unsustainable and unreasonable.
    Pierrette, Tweety, and tntrn like this.

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