Five single-payer protestors arrested (Nurses, Docs)

  1. 6
    Five protesters were arrested this morning at a Senate hearing on health-care reform. The protesters -- some, who identified themselves as doctors and nurses -- were be charged with "Disruption of Congress," according to the Capitol Police spokeswoman. The Senate Finance Committee hearing was a roundtable discussion between senators and experts on the best way to pay for health-care reform.

    As the hearing opened, about 25 women, who identified themselves as nurses stood up, turning their backs to the senators. Taped to each of their red shirts were signs that called on Congress to pass what's called a "single-payer system," a system in which the government alone would run health care -- no private insurance.

    "Nurses say patients first," the signs read. "Pass single payer."

    Full Article: http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archi...2/1929527.aspx

    CSPAN Video:

    ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed. View this video at YouTube
  2. 209 Comments so far...

  3. 15
    I love the high paid insurance execs telling us how they will protect us against big government "socialized" medicine. Something needs to be done. My co-pay is now 35.00! That is a CO-PAY! Two years ago my company stopped covering my spouse as the primary company. So now we have to pay for him to have insurance through his company. We are paying out of pocket 300.00 a month just to have the insurance. Between that and the medication my darling husband takes for his asthma and incidentals for the kids we pay about 500.00 a month in medical care. Oh, and believe me I am GREATFUL we have coverage.

    My mother, who worked as a supervisor in the auto industry for over 30 years just received a letter in Feb that her coverage was being cancelled as of April. She now has to pay over 800.00 a month just to have something. AND, she is a healthy woman.
  4. 4
    Remember Obama said all will be bought to the table in this discussion on health care ???? why just insurance companies ? How dare they in America arrest Nurses and doctors??? I worked so hard to get him elected
    Misty1, Merced, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  5. 11
    It was in Congress this happened. Can't blame the President for that, can we? I am hoping that having the execs from the insurance companies is just the first step in the process. We all know that this isn't going to happen overnight. My biggest fear is that they will bring in doctors and nurses who are academic and researched based. They need to have input from those of us who are at the bedside every day.
    Not_A_Hat_Person, CityKat, wooh, and 8 others like this.
  6. 5
    There are lots of us out there that are academic & research based that still work at the bedside, or still see patients. Information dissemination at all levels might be a good thing.
  7. 6
    First - a little housekeeping. None of the 25 who ID'd themselves as nurses were arrested according to the article. They left as a group, unescorted by police. Individual protesters who weren't part of the 25 were later arrested.

    Second - I wonder how exactly these nurses, or anyone else, expects the government to run and pay for healthcare. The government has no money except that which it takes from its citizens. The answer is not for me and other taxpayers to pay for the husband's asthma medicine mentioned above. We already pay for too many people who cannot (or will not) pay for healthcare as it is now. The solution to the problem we have created through endless Great Society programs is to decrease spending in these areas, not increase it.
    Spidey's mom, catshowlady, tntrn, and 3 others like this.
  8. 18
    Quote from VORB
    First - a little housekeeping. None of the 25 who ID'd themselves as nurses were arrested according to the article. They left as a group, unescorted by police. Individual protesters who weren't part of the 25 were later arrested.

    Second - I wonder how exactly these nurses, or anyone else, expects the government to run and pay for healthcare. The government has no money except that which it takes from its citizens. The answer is not for me and other taxpayers to pay for the husband's asthma medicine mentioned above. We already pay for too many people who cannot (or will not) pay for healthcare as it is now. The solution to the problem we have created through endless Great Society programs is to decrease spending in these areas, not increase it.

    I happen to disagree. So do the leaders of almost every other nation in the world. Their countries have healthcare systems that do not exempt low-income people. Ours does. Has nothing to do with "Great Society," IMO, has to do with "right" and "wrong."

    It's not "right" that a cashier in a convenient store cannot afford healthcare but the guy in jail gets it for free. GWIM?

    If we don't pay for those who cannot pay for their own healthcare, it means that ultimately hospitals, nursing homes, and other healthcare facilities will be forced to close -- and then nobody gets nuthin'.

    As I said, this is JMO.
  9. 7
    Unfortunately, implementing programs that sounded nice or seemed right at the time has us in quite a bind. The gov't is borrowing nearly 50 cents of every dollar it spends. None of this debate will really matter once the system completely colapses.

    And by the way, this has everything to do with Great Society. That's the acorn from which this monster grew.

    We could save hundreds of millions of dollars by stopping caring for illegal foreigners who come to our hospitals, but we lack to will to do so. So we make our own bed and deal with the consequences. Which to the executive and legislative branches means higher taxes to pay for their mess they've created.
  10. 11
    Quote from VORB
    And by the way, this has everything to do with Great Society. That's the acorn from which this monster grew.
    I can see where you're coming from on this, but I disagree. The monster grew from failed managed care policies and oversight.
  11. 3
    The government has already proven itself incapable of planning, designing, running and paying for (with taxpayer dollars) social services programs.

    Medicare and Social Security were intended to be self-funding programs. Our government leaders failed to anticipate and plan for societal changes (decreased family size, longer lifespan, earlier retirement, increases in costly disease care for diabetes, cancer, end of life, fluctuations in the economy among other things) that led these programs to spend more than they brought in. Politicians, in the desire for re-election, voted for enhanced benefits for recipients without regard to the inablility of the system to sustain itself. Consequently, many of us who have paid taxes for an entire working lifetime will likely receive little to nothing from either program.

    Why in the world would we trust the government to fashion a national program for healthcare when it has failed in every other similar attempt?

    Social Security, Medicare Face Insolvency Sooner

    WASHINGTON -- The government revised estimates for the long-term solvency of Medicare and Social Security on Tuesday, moving up the date when trust funds for the entitlement programs will run out of money.

    The Medicare fund for hospital care will be depleted in 2017, two years earlier than government actuaries estimated a year ago. Last year marked the first time that Medicare ran a deficit, paying out more in benefits than it generates from taxes and other revenue.

    The report also factors in a 21% cut in payments this year, required by law, to doctors working for Medicare....

    The actuaries estimated that Social Security beneficiaries would not receive a cost-of-living increase for the next two years, and that a quarter of Medicare beneficiaries would pay higher-than-usual increases in monthly premiums, 8% in 2010 and 15% in 2011. The trustees are the secretaries of labor, Treasury and health and human services, as well as the commissioner of Social Security....

    ...there is no way to balance Medicare without significant increases in taxes," said Henry Aaron, an economist with the liberal-leaning Brookings Institution.

    full article: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124212734686110365.html


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