Where have all the honey bees gone?

  1. 3
    http://www.treehugger.com/natural-sc...-bad-news.html

    The discovery means that fungicides, thought harmless to bees, is actually a significant part of Colony Collapse Disorder. And that likely means farmers need a whole new set of regulations about how to use fungicides. While neonicotinoids have been linked to mass bee deaths -- the same type of chemical at the heart of the massive bumble bee die off in Oregon -- this study opens up an entirely new finding that it is more than one group of pesticides, but a combination of many chemicals, which makes the problem far more complex.
    And it is not just the types of chemicals used that need to be considered, but also spraying practices. The bees sampled by the authors foraged not from crops, but almost exclusively from weeds and wildflowers, which means bees are more widely exposed to pesticides than thought.

    The bee colony collapse is not new news. The cause of it has been a mystery that has had an evolving with partial answers beginning to be found.

    We already import tons of honey from China, much of it undocumented and illegal. With the collapse of the hives the cost of honey will continue to escalate and you will think you are paying so much becasue of the scarcity of US honey. No, you are paying this money for Chinese honey that piggy backs on the loss of US hives.
    Tinker88, BCgradnurse, and herring_RN like this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 28 Comments...

  3. 2
    Slightly off-subject comment from me. . .

    Two small bee hives were developing on the eave just a couple of feet away from my front door. The queen bees were freaking me out.

    I did what I felt I had to do for my safety. . . I got a broom, 'swept' the hives away, and called it a day. I have no problem with bee hives, but not two feet away from my front door.
    herring_RN and aknottedyarn like this.
  4. 5
    They may or may not have been honey bees. Not all bees do as much work as honey bees.

    These little workers pollinate flowers so vegetables can grow. We cannot get food without them. They create honey that is used around the globe.

    If you think it is a real honey bee hive then call your state ag dept. and see if they can get someone to collect the queen and take the workers to start a new hive. Much better than killing them.
    OCNRN63, BCgradnurse, herring_RN, and 2 others like this.
  5. 2
    Honey bees are of extreme importance here in alaska...we import them.
    BCgradnurse and aknottedyarn like this.
  6. 4
    This year we started only buying honey from local producers at the farmer's market. I don't trust China and after reading about mislabeling and reselling practices I don't trust the corporate honey sold in grocery stores. Besides, the local desert honey has a unique taste and aroma that reminds me of my desert hikes.
    OCNRN63, BCgradnurse, aknottedyarn, and 1 other like this.
  7. 3
    We had bees in our fence. The city recommended a company that charged just $250.00 to cut the fence and vacuum the queen and other bees. they kept the honey too, except for a sample they gave us.
    The bees are now on a Ventura County farm.

    I have an epi pen 've never had to use because I am allergic to bee stings.
    OCNRN63, BCgradnurse, and aknottedyarn like this.
  8. 3
    Quote from herring_RN
    The bees are now on a Ventura County farm.
    Cool. What a coincidence. . .I was born and raised in Ventura County (Oxnard, to be precise). There was very little farmland left there the last time I visited because most of it had been developed for real estate during the housing boom of about 8 to 10 years ago.
  9. 2
    Amateur ????????? whatever bee hivers are called, live across the road in my small rural community.
    They don't share their honey.
    They provide an environment for honey bees and for that I am grateful.
    BCgradnurse and herring_RN like this.
  10. 2
    Quote from imintrouble
    Amateur ????????? whatever bee hivers are called, live across the road in my small rural community.
    They don't share their honey.
    They provide an environment for honey bees and for that I am grateful.
    Their honey is really liquid gold.

    Don't feel bad - my relatives don't share their maple syrup with me. I have to buy it like everyone else. I do get a better price.

    Is the environment they have for the bees organic? There have been so many hives lost. Current thinking is all the chemicals added to prevent weeds, fungus, bugs, varmits etc.
    BCgradnurse and herring_RN like this.
  11. 3
    Quote from aknottedyarn
    Their honey is really liquid gold.

    Don't feel bad - my relatives don't share their maple syrup with me. I have to buy it like everyone else. I do get a better price.

    Is the environment they have for the bees organic? There have been so many hives lost. Current thinking is all the chemicals added to prevent weeds, fungus, bugs, varmits etc.
    They are as back to nature as they can possibly get.
    I read about this phenomenon years ago when nobody had a clue what was causing it. The environmental catastrophe that would occur with the loss of honey bees is truly scary. Much scarier than anything nuclear.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top