The failure of Obamacare

  1. Arizona Obamacare Plan To Jump By 116 Percent When Premiums Go Up Next Year

    Arizona will be hit the hardest when Obamacare premiums go up next year. The Department of Health and Human Services revealed Monday that premiums for a midlevel benchmark plan will increase an average of 25 percent across the 39 states served by the federally run online market, and that about 1 in 5 consumers will have plans only from a single insurer to pick from, after major national carriers such as UnitedHealth Group, Humana and Aetna scaled back their roles.


    However, in Arizona, unsubsidized premiums for a hypothetical 27-year-old buying a benchmark “second-lowest cost silver plan” will jump by 116 percent, from $196 to $422, according to the administration report.

    Arizona Obamacare Plan To Jump By 116 % When Premiums Go Up Next Year << CBS New York
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  2. 124 Comments

  3. by   nursej22
    The success of Obamacare: My eldest son who has Type 1 diabetes does not have to wait six months for coverage when he changes jobs. My youngest son, daughter and 2 grandchildren are able to obtain health care even though they are underemployed. Routine screening detected that I have pre-diabetes that can be treated prior to organ damage. For all of us, flu shots are covered by our insurance.

    Is the Affordable Care Act perfect? By no means, but instead of throwing millions of people off of coverage, let's fix the parts that don't work. If my tail light burns out, I replace just the bulb, I don't discard my auto and hope a new one springs up in its place.
  4. by   Rose_Queen
    The system before the ACA was a failure. How many people were uninsured and had no access? At least ACA made that possible for many of those uninsured. We still have a long way to go, but progress is progress.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from nursej22

    Is the Affordable Care Act perfect? By no means, but instead of throwing millions of people off of coverage, let's fix the parts that don't work. If my tail light burns out, I replace just the bulb, I don't discard my auto and hope a new one springs up in its place.
    This was the same argument many of us made about the healthcare system BEFORE Obamacare passed.

    Was our system perfect? No...but lets fix the parts that don't work and not throw away the whole thing.

    We are in a mess now.
  6. by   herring_RN
    Quote from Spidey's mom
    This was the same argument many of us made about the healthcare system BEFORE Obamacare passed.

    Was our system perfect? No...but lets fix the parts that don't work and not throw away the whole thing.

    We are in a mess now.
    We are still in a mess. BUT now, at least in most states, people with a preexisting condition can afford health insurance with or without the subsidy. You know how important it can be for a younger, seemingly healthy person to have health insurance.

    My daughter, who does not qualify for a subsidy, has been insured thanks to the ACA. Before the premiums were almost 80% of her income due to a history of obesity. (She lost weight in 2005 and has kept it off).
    Because her premiums will increase next year she will have to spend less of non essentials.
    So far she has remained healthy so only used the yearly preventative visit that is part of all ACA plans. IF she gets sick she could need to pay co pays and other costs up to $6,500.00 before the plan pays 100%. I pray she stays well, but glad she has insurance if needed.

    This mess is better than what we had before.
    You here know I'm for improved Medicare for All single payer.
  7. by   nursej22
    Quote from herring_RN

    This mess is better than what we had before.
    You here know I'm for improved Medicare for All single payer.
    I'm with you Herring. I would so much rather that the dollars I and my employer fork over to a for profit insurance company went into the Medicare fund. We also need to allow the federal government the ability to negotiate for lower drug prices.

    I would prefer this be phased in over years, so that the folks working in the insurance agency would not suddenly be thrown into the unemployed ranks.
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from Spidey's mom
    This was the same argument many of us made about the healthcare system BEFORE Obamacare passed.

    Was our system perfect? No...but lets fix the parts that don't work and not throw away the whole thing.

    We are in a mess now.

    What are you talking about? As far as I know we did not throw away the whole healthcare system.
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 27, '16
  9. by   Tweety
    It's working well for these guys:

    The zeros aren't showing up in the tag below. CEO pay exceeds 10 million


    Top health insurance CEO pay exceeds $1� million in 2�14 | FierceHealthcare
  10. by   Tweety
    I'm all over the place about the AFA. It hasn't been a resounding success or failure. I've taken care of patients on it and they've been able to get needed hip replacements after suffering bone on bone pain for years.

    What Obamacare&#39;s Successes Should Tell Us About Its Failures | Huffington Post
  11. by   BCgradnurse
    I agree it is by no means perfect, but I wouldn't call it a resounding failure either. Many more people have been able to get healthcare. However, premiums can be high and not very affordable. This increase in premiums was happening long before The ACA came into being, and is a worrisome trend.

    I am am also in favor of a single payer system. I don't think I'll see it in my lifetime.
  12. by   AndyB
    Quote from nursej22
    The success of Obamacare: My eldest son who has Type 1 diabetes does not have to wait six months for coverage when he changes jobs. My youngest son, daughter and 2 grandchildren are able to obtain health care even though they are underemployed. Routine screening detected that I have pre-diabetes that can be treated prior to organ damage. For all of us, flu shots are covered by our insurance.

    Is the Affordable Care Act perfect? By no means, but instead of throwing millions of people off of coverage, let's fix the parts that don't work. If my tail light burns out, I replace just the bulb, I don't discard my auto and hope a new one springs up in its place.

    So you are saying that Obamacare is swell despite premiums for a midlevel benchmark plan increasing an average of 25 percent across the 39 states served by the federally run online market, and that about 1 in 5 consumers will have plans only from a single insurer to pick from?

    Really swell to be in Arizona where your premiums are going to be jacked up 116%

    Of course these drastic changes in premiums are being revealed by the Obama ran Department of Health and Human Services so one can almost bet the figures have been decreased. After all who can trust an establishment that flat out lied in stating that:

    "If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor. Period."

    "If you like your health care plan, you'll be able to keep it."

    “We’re going to lower your premiums by up to $2500 per family per year.

    Obamacare chief architectJohnathan Gruber had it right when he stated a "lack of transparency" and the "stupidity of the American voter" helped Congress approve ObamaCare.As for the rest of your claims Obamacare only mandates insurance AFTER 90 days when switching jobs though some employers have a period less than this.
  13. by   heron
    Without at least a public option (if not single-payer) and the legal authority for CMS to negotiate prices of drugs and dme, we're kinda stuck. Those two options were traded away to the private sector years ago in the name of "free market competition" - doublespeak for guaranteed non-competition. The only "free" part of this market is corporate access to consumers' wallets either directly or via the IRS.
  14. by   nursej22
    Quote from AndyB
    So you are saying that Obamacare is swell
    Your words, not mine. I am saying that parts of a complicated program do work. Congress has had 7 years to improve that parts that don't, and yet they have focused only repeal.

    You are correct in that some of the projections about costs have been wrong, but at least part of that can be attributed to states not participating in the exchange program.

    You can keep your doctor and your plan was naive, because those of us in healthcare understand that plans and coverage change on a regular basis.

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