The American Health Care Act - page 3

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  1. by   SC_RNDude
    Quote from Lil Nel
    Since women's health is attacked under this proposal, and by this administration, I just made a $35 donation to Planned Parenthood.
    Good for you. That's how it should be funded.
  2. by   nursej22
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    I prefer to call our current state Trumpturdistan.
    Where you can get chemo in the ER, live in a car, and eat vouchers.
    And we will reduce unemployment by hiring more ICE agents, increasing the military, and hiring into jobs formally held by undocumented workers
  3. by   tntrn
    Quote from nursej22
    And we will reduce unemployment by hiring more ICE agents, increasing the military, and hiring into jobs formally held by undocumented workers
    Sounds like a very good start.
  4. by   macawake
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    Good for you. That's how it should be funded.
    I honestly don't understand the rationale behind this. Isn't women's reproductive health something we can all agree is important to society as a whole? When we do know that access to healthcare for all saves lives, why make that access dependent on donations?


    Why Infant Mortality Is Higher In The US - Business Insider


    Infant mortality rates in the US are 3 deaths per 1000 greater than in Scandinavia
    The data suggests that the higher infant mortality in the US comes almost entirely from the deaths of babies born to poor women. Once they broke down the data into income and education levels the researchers found that, somewhat unsurprisingly, the infants of well-off, educated white women are just as likely to survive as their counterparts in Europe.

  5. by   nursej22
    Quote from tntrn
    Sounds like a very good start.
    Considering that conservatives count retired people as unemployed, I foresee my self milking cows when I'm 70.
  6. by   toomuchbaloney
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    Good for you. That's how it should be funded.
    Apparently your local hospital should be funded that way as well because; a) they likely provide abortion services in some form as well, and b) the new republican health insurance proposal (DonTCare) Will leave millions without ability to pay for either coverage or care. Hospitals will go broke.
  7. by   margin261
    Quote from Lil Nel
    I heard today on NPR that some Republicans want to start culling the Medicaid rolls prior to 2020. They want to start in 2018. If so, I hope it comes before the midterm elections so their constituents can see who truly is concerned about the well-being of the poor in this country.

    Have you all heard about the member of Congress from Kansas who said the poor and homeless aren't interested in healthcare? If not, please read various articles in NY Daily News and elsewhere.

    The Washington Post had a short article about John Shimkus (R-IL), who asked why men should be required to pay for prenatal care as part of health insurance coverage.

    Gee, I think it is for the same reason why we all pay taxes that go to pay for schools, even though some of us don't have children. And the same reason why we pay taxes for highways, even though we may not own a car or truck.

    I think the reason we all pay is because we live in a democracy (Republic really), at least we used to. And almost anybody with a brain can figure out that a civil society benefits all, not just individuals.

    But I fear this is no longer a democracy, but a dictatorship (and not the benevolent kind) called Trumplandia.

    Someone's rebuttal to that critical thinker, Mr Shimkus, is that men's insurance covers prenatal care for the same reason women's covers prostate cancer. And everyone's covers hypertension, whether you have it or not.

    Did anyone catch Paul Ryan's explanation of the 'fatal conceit' of Obamacare? That it was designed so that healthy people pay for sicker people?? That's why it's in a death spiral.

    These people, that are responsible for crafting healthcare laws, literally have no idea how insurance works. Or, they are counting on trump's 'low information' voters to believe every bit of drivel they put out & be outraged at what Obama 'did' to them. And after the election results & the continuing blind support of trump, they can be assured those people won't do any research or believe anything the media tries to tell them until it's too late.
  8. by   MunoRN
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    "People going to the ER with colds & flu because they don't have a PCP."

    As a ER nurse, I can tell you people , in great numbers, who have insurance are still using the ER for such things. Sometimes using an ambulance and getting a Medicare paid taxi home.

    I suppose it could get worse, but it truly is hard to imagine it significantly would.
    I also agree that people are going to continue to use the ER for things that may turn out to be nothing, although I don't think that's really a problem. The flu, for instance, is definitely a legitimate reason to go the ER, few patients decline as rapidly as flu patients. We've had a number of flu patients this year that walk into the ER, and then over the next 36 hours work their way through BiPAP, a vent, and then onto ECMO. I spend about 1/3 of my time in the ER, about 1/2 in the ICU, and it's pretty common to have a patient in ICU where you ponder how much better off they would be if they had just come into the ER a day earlier. So I'll gladly take a bunch of non-acute patients coming to the ER if it means even a few people aren't waiting that extra day.
  9. by   MunoRN
    I've noticed the goals of republican reform have been changing all of a sudden. Now it's being described as having only one goal; to reduce how much we pay through the federal government. So a plan that results in us paying a lot more, yet results in a collapsing healthcare system (fewer and fewer hospitals to treat people) is still a successful plan?
  10. by   SC_RNDude
    Quote from MunoRN
    I also agree that people are going to continue to use the ER for things that may turn out to be nothing, although I don't think that's really a problem. The flu, for instance, is definitely a legitimate reason to go the ER, few patients decline as rapidly as flu patients. We've had a number of flu patients this year that walk into the ER, and then over the next 36 hours work their way through BiPAP, a vent, and then onto ECMO. I spend about 1/3 of my time in the ER, about 1/2 in the ICU, and it's pretty common to have a patient in ICU where you ponder how much better off they would be if they had just come into the ER a day earlier. So I'll gladly take a bunch of non-acute patients coming to the ER if it means even a few people aren't waiting that extra day.
    The point was that people are using the ER when they should be seeing their PCP.
  11. by   SC_RNDude
    Quote from macawake
    I honestly don't understand the rationale behind this. Isn't women's reproductive health something we can all agree is important to society as a whole? When we do know that access to healthcare for all saves lives, why make that access dependent on donations?


    Why Infant Mortality Is Higher In The US - Business Insider







    We already subsidize insurance and provide Medicare/Medicaid so that people can visit a PCP. And, when needed, other specialty physicians. It's redundant and inefficient to also subsidize PP.

    If they can make it on their own and/or with donations, more power to them.

    PP gets about $550 million a year from government payments. Some of these wealthy celebrities could put their money where their mouth is and raise that.
  12. by   herring_RN
    Medicaid reimburses nonprofit healthcare providers, including Planned Parenthood, for the medical services they provide.
    Planned parenthood provides preventive medical services, including life-saving cancer screenings, HIV testing, and birth control, and prenatal care.

    Medicaid reimburses hospitals and doctors, who provide abortions, for other care they provide.
    Are there enough providers, especially for those who want to keep secret that they are getting birth control and STD education and treatment?


    In 1970 we had no health insurance. I called several doctors’ offices trying to get an appointment for a pregnancy test. Each and every one referred me to Planned Parenthood.
    I went to Planned Parenthood twice for pregnancy tests. I paid a small amount. The second test was positive. I was happy to be having a second child, but worried about how to pay for prenatal care and childbirth.
    Planned Parenthood referred me to a hospital that had a plan where I would pay monthly for five months for all prenatal and hospital care would be needed. I was fortunate to have a healthy pregnancy. My son had newborn jaundice so had to stay and extra two days under bili-lights. There was no additional cost.
    A woman in the same program gave birth early. Her baby needed NICU care. There was no additional cost f either. Kind of a childbirth insurance.
    That hospital had a well-baby clinic with low cost visits to interns and residents with lots of teaching by RNs.
  13. by   margin261
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    "People going to the ER with colds & flu because they don't have a PCP."

    As a ER nurse, I can tell you people , in great numbers, who have insurance are still using the ER for such things. Sometimes using an ambulance and getting a Medicare paid taxi home.

    I suppose it could get worse, but it truly is hard to imagine it significantly would.

    I really can't tell if you're being deliberately obtuse or really didn't get the point I was making.

    First- I want to say I agree with Muno & I shouldn't have included flu in my example. People are dying from the flu & yes, the ER iis appropriate in many of those cases.

    There will always be a certain segment of the population that goes to the ER for trivial things. Whether they have insurance or not will not affect their decision making. Just as there will always be a certain segment that won't go to the doctor/hospital until they are almost beyond helping.

    Of those that utilize the ER for trivial things currently, I would imagine that a larger proportion of them have insurance that will cover some part of the bill. If millions lose insurance under the 'American Healthcare Act', they'll still go to the ER, but have no insurance to cover any part of the bill.

    Also, for an ambulance to give patients a ride home, they must be stretcher bound- unable to even sit up in a wheelchair. Has to be a medical necessity for Medicare to pay for a return trip. For that matter, the trip to the hospital has to be shown as a medical necessity, for Medicare to pay.

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