The American Health Care Act - page 2

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  1. by   toomuchbaloney
    The Republican plan is not a repeal of theACA.
    It is not a replacement.
    It is a collection of bad ideas that will not improve access or reduce costs for patients.

    Some of the elements of this proposal should have been considered as fixes to the current law by the republicans over the past 6 years.

    Instead, the GOP had been content to spread lies and fear about the ACA with their battle cry of "Repeal & Replace". Now they are confronted with the hard realities of being the people responsible for the health care of the nation.

    Slogans won't suffice.
    Snark won't cut it.
    Lives are at stake.

    The only viable replacement for the ACA is single payer.

    This Congress needs help. I'll make them some coffee if someone else will go cut some roses.
    Last edit by toomuchbaloney on Mar 8
  2. by   margin261
    Just a random collection of snippets I've read & thought about since they made the "big reveal"--
    - as I expected, the poor, the elderly & the unhealthy are going to get shafted.

    - someone did a piece on how women's health will be affected. Especially if the defunding of PP goes through (even though men are treated there as well). They're trying to stop the access to low/no cost birth control, access to abortion, etc. (I wish I could remember more from the article, it was enlightening & frightening.

    **I really wish everyone would realize that 1) not all PP provide abortions & 2) by law, no government funds are ever used to fund abortions

    - some news outlet said Chaffetz's iphone comment was about the same as one Obama made a few years ago. No, it wasn't. Obama specifically said someone making 40k/yr complaining about $300/mo for insurance might need to reexamine priorities.
    What Chaffetz said is insulting to people who would have to go without food to get insurance. To me, once again, it just shows how out of touch congress is with 'their people'.

    - with what they're proposing, millions will lose insurance & we'll be right back where we were. People going to the ER with colds & flu because they don't have a PCP. More people dying of preventable complications because they aren't seeing a doctor or taking routine meds. If people can't afford insurance, they aren't going to pay an ER bill. And now that young healthy folks have the 'freedom' not to have insurance, when they're in really bad accidents & are air lifted to a trauma unit & stay in the hospital for a month- do they hsve the freedom to declare bankruptcy from that 6 digit hospital bill?

    - And for the love of all that is holy, please tell your trump loving friends to understand what paul ryan & friends mean when they say "of course everyone will have 'access' to insurance!!"

    I have access to all manner of mansions where I live. What I do not have is the funds to purchase one.

    They use the word 'access' frequently, and follow it up with 'freedom to choose', and people are falling for it.
  3. by   MunoRN
    Here's something I don't get that I haven't seen in the coverage, so maybe someone can enlighten me.

    Republicans are asking the CBO to score the bill based on the numbers of people covered by group (employer provided) insurance and individual insurance. What makes no sense is why any employer would continue to provide group insurance to their employees, no matter how much they may want to.

    The tax credits only apply to those who purchase insurance on the individual market, not employer provided plans (which are now free to make their employee's contribution 100% of the cost).

    Under the bill, I would get $12,000 in tax credits to buy a non-group plan, making a plan that costs $12,000 per year "free" to both myself and my employer. It would be idiotic for any employer not to utilize these tax credits. This means that essentially everyone would be using the tax credits, which adds up to at least $500,000,000,000 per year in government costs just in the tax credits.
  4. by   margin261
    Quote from MunoRN
    Here's something I don't get that I haven't seen in the coverage, so maybe someone can enlighten me.

    Republicans are asking the CBO to score the bill based on the numbers of people covered by group (employer provided) insurance and individual insurance. What makes no sense is why any employer would continue to provide group insurance to their employees, no matter how much they may want to.

    The tax credits only apply to those who purchase insurance on the individual market, not employer provided plans (which are now free to make their employee's contribution 100% of the cost).

    Under the bill, I would get $12,000 in tax credits to buy a non-group plan, making a plan that costs $12,000 per year "free" to both myself and my employer. It would be idiotic for any employer not to utilize these tax credits. This means that essentially everyone would be using the tax credits, which adds up to at least $500,000,000,000 per year in government costs just in the tax credits.

    Muno- I hadn't even thought of that. I was trying to understand the part about taxing employers more for providing good plans for employees, if I read that correctly (which is possible I didn't).

    Are employers mandated to provide insurance to employees? With the new proposal, I mean. I was just thinking if they're taxed more, my premiums would just go up!
  5. by   MunoRN
    Quote from margin261
    Muno- I hadn't even thought of that. I was trying to understand the part about taxing employers more for providing good plans for employees, if I read that correctly (which is possible I didn't).
    It sounds like you're talking about the "cadillac tax", which taxed the value of plans over a certain limit in order to discourage plans that left no cost responsibilities to the consumer. The idea was that requiring planholders to be consumers of healthcare services to at least some degree would help control prices. This was supposedly a major requirement of republican reform; to place even more emphasis on having insurance that only covers higher costs (higher deductible plans) so that consumerism would help control prices.

    But instead they repealed the cadillac tax. Even worse, the tax credit system in the bill encourages people to buy the lowest deductible plan the credit will cover, since using an HSA based high deductible plan would essentially be leaving free (taxpayer funded) money on the table.

    Quote from margin261
    Are employers mandated to provide insurance to employees? With the new proposal, I mean. I was just thinking if they're taxed more, my premiums would just go up!
    The bill would immediately end the requirement that employers provide insurance to employees. Republicans have talked about getting rid of the tax exemption for employer provided plans, which may still happen as republicans start looking to offset the costs of their plan. But even with the tax exemption, it still doesn't make sense to use an employer provided plan and not a non-group plan which would be paid for by tax credits.
  6. by   Lil Nel
    Something else that the Republican ACA does is revamp Medicaid. The bill really returns the responsiblity of paying for Medicaid to the states via block grants.

    To cover their own butts, Republican voters won't lose their Medicaid until 2020. Maybe that is a coincidence, but that is after the 2018 midterm elections. So, Republicans will be able to go home and say: "You didn't lose your health insurance" to angry voters. This is a real attack on Medicaid recipients. It is a culling of the Medicaid rolls.

    Also, when insurance companies are allowed to raise rates 30% for anybody attempting to purchase coverage after a lapse in coverage of 2-3 months, that money will go to the insurance carrier, not the federal government (under Obamacare, penalities paid go the government). That appears to be a big win for BUSINESS, oh, right, that's who Republicans represent, after all.

    Paul Ryan said it the bill represents "hard work." I wrote my Congressman - Andy Barr - that if "after hard work, this is the best you all can do, than you are truly a sorry lot." In the same e-mail, I also asked for Trump's tax returns AGAIN.

    I think we all know who benefits from this Republican healthcare plan.

    Democrats need to get in front of educating those helped by Obamacare as to how this plan will "help" them in the future.
  7. by   SC_RNDude
    "People going to the ER with colds & flu because they don't have a PCP."

    As a ER nurse, I can tell you people , in great numbers, who have insurance are still using the ER for such things. Sometimes using an ambulance and getting a Medicare paid taxi home.

    I suppose it could get worse, but it truly is hard to imagine it significantly would.
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    "People going to the ER with colds & flu because they don't have a PCP."

    As a ER nurse, I can tell you people , in great numbers, who have insurance are still using the ER for such things. Sometimes using an ambulance and getting a Medicare paid taxi home.

    I suppose it could get worse, but it truly is hard to imagine it significantly would.

    I have to say I probably agree with this. ERs are abused, but at least it's some revenue maybe? I've used Urgent care a few times over the years and have never been to an ER. Wish people would do this. Also, I had a coworker use an online service that they have here in my county with a doc via video that was cool.

    What is more concerning to me is that people without insurance are walking around with potentially serious illnesses that are not diagnosed or treated because symptoms might be dismissed...things like diabetes, hypertension and cancers. Yes, I know people with insurance do this too.
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from Lil Nel
    SI think we all know who benefits from this Republican healthcare plan.

    Yes.

    While it I think that perhaps insurance executives shouldn't face any consequences because of their industry and be treated like other industries, it is very clear what some of the motivation behind this plan is.

    Here's the secret payoff to health insurance CEOs buried in the GOP Obamacare repeal bill - LA Times
  10. by   Lil Nel
    I heard today on NPR that some Republicans want to start culling the Medicaid rolls prior to 2020. They want to start in 2018. If so, I hope it comes before the midterm elections so their constituents can see who truly is concerned about the well-being of the poor in this country.

    Have you all heard about the member of Congress from Kansas who said the poor and homeless aren't interested in healthcare? If not, please read various articles in NY Daily News and elsewhere.

    The Washington Post had a short article about John Shimkus (R-IL), who asked why men should be required to pay for prenatal care as part of health insurance coverage.

    Gee, I think it is for the same reason why we all pay taxes that go to pay for schools, even though some of us don't have children. And the same reason why we pay taxes for highways, even though we may not own a car or truck.

    I think the reason we all pay is because we live in a democracy (Republic really), at least we used to. And almost anybody with a brain can figure out that a civil society benefits all, not just individuals.

    But I fear this is no longer a democracy, but a dictatorship (and not the benevolent kind) called Trumplandia.
  11. by   nursej22
    Sitting at a Vaccinology conference, and the thought of what Trumpcare might do to vaccination rates is sobering
  12. by   Lil Nel
    Since women's health is attacked under this proposal, and by this administration, I just made a $35 donation to Planned Parenthood.
  13. by   toomuchbaloney
    I prefer to call our current state Trumpturdistan.
    Where you can get chemo in the ER, live in a car, and eat vouchers.

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