Support Planned Parenthood - page 14

by Alikat9

10,435 Views | 167 Comments

I am a strong supporter of Planned Parenthood. Recently the House of Representatives has voted for the government not to fund this organization. I think it is an awful thing to do to communities all over the US. The argument is... Read More


  1. 0
    the idea of a bowl with condoms sitting out in an office - regardless of the purpose of the organization - is irresponsible to me. this comes from my own experiences with pp in a college town not giving good advice to young women but just handing them brown paper bags with plan b, which the young women use as birth control. and the memory of a mom who bragged that she put a bowl of condoms by the front door for her son.
    of course, any time there is any kind of birth control available, there should be accurate information on how to use it - condoms, ocps, iuds, whatever. if you don't, that's irresponsible, whether you are a mother or a medical provider.

    as for condoms being easy to get - didn't sharpeimom mention that condoms are behind the counter in her town? not exactly friendly nor anonymous. it might be easy for you to get them, but apparently it is not for everyone everywhere.
  2. 0
    Quote from Elvish

    As for condoms being easy to get - didn't Sharpeimom mention that condoms are behind the counter in her town? Not exactly friendly nor anonymous. It might be easy for you to get them, but apparently it is not for everyone everywhere.
    I was actually going to mention that but my mind wandered.

    However, I don't think her experience is the norm.
  3. 2
    Quote from Elvish
    Of course, any time there is any kind of birth control available, there should be accurate information on how to use it - condoms, OCPs, IUDs, whatever. If you don't, that's irresponsible, whether you are a mother or a medical provider.

    As for condoms being easy to get - didn't Sharpeimom mention that condoms are behind the counter in her town? Not exactly friendly nor anonymous. It might be easy for you to get them, but apparently it is not for everyone everywhere.
    I agree with Steph. I don't think that's the norm. But even so, is asking for a condom at the store counter really any more traumatizing than walking into a clinic and requesting one? Other than having to pay, rather than just reaching into the big bowl on the counter.

    Is it not reasonable to expect some degree of ownership of individuals who are choosing to engage in sexual activity? Perhaps one reason we have so many unplanned pregnancies is not that condoms are hard to get. Perhaps it is too easy, with no personal thought, planning or responsibility involved.
    Spidey's mom and Rikki's Number like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from Spidey's mom
    And the memory of a mom who bragged that she put a bowl of condoms by the front door for her son.
    Sounds like a responsible parent to me. Many parents warn their sons to stay protected. Nothing wrong with helping them follow through. Betcha that kid didn't come home with an unplanned baby or an STD. I know you raised two boys differently and neither did they. However, I would do the same with a sexually active child of mine if he insisted on being sexually active. Although I probably wouldn't have bragged about it. I remember my mother putting my sister on the pill when she started dating an older guy. She couldn't stop her relationship but didn't want my sister getting pregnant. Preaching abstinence to someone already having sex will only get them to lie back. Being honest and getting your head out of the sand and helping with protection might just prevent one abortion. In my opinion. I'll never have kids and I don't mean to be judgmental of anyone in how they choose to raise their kids. To each his own.

    Being gay, I'm used to seeing bowls of condoms and AIDS info packets. Heck my former church that had primarily gay people in it had a bowl of condoms in their bathroom.

    Jolie, I'm not understanding the connection between easy access to condoms and unwanted pregnancy, but certainly agree with the idea of personal responsibility, part of which is protection but nothing wrong with a responsible adult saying "this is the kind of protection you need, and can I help you get it".
    Last edit by Tweety on Feb 5, '12
    wooh likes this.
  5. 3
    Quote from Jolie
    I think you're getting your dander up over nothing. Let me clarify. I don't attempt to force my beliefs on anyone. I am more than willing to teach "abstinence PLUS safe reliable access to birth control (for single AND married, because we married folks like birth control too)" if that is what they request, in the appropriate setting. But the appropriate setting is NOT a clinic funded by religious organizations that view unmarried sex as a sin.
    I think you misunderstand that I'm not decrying them for anything nor is my dander really that far up right now. These are genuinely good people running the place, not the least of which is my OB, whom I dearly love. I am just clarifying what I think would work for an organization that considers itself to be pro-life. As someone who donates to this place, I believe I should be able to suggest things that might be helpful to that end. Do not and would not suggest free-for-all sex, and do not believe that providing information on/access to birth control promotes that.

    It's a bit disheartening to read the brochure and see that, when asked about birth control, even married women are sent to their doctor for information and/or a script. Seriously? Not even birth control information for married women? This seems to be a bit counter-productive, especially for a religious organization that isn't affiliated with any one church.

    Regardless of whether you and I agree on the above, I continue to be frustrated by the mindset that says, "No sex, no information about sex, we want no birth control information nor services available to you, but don't abort." From your posts, I gather that you don't hold this mindset, but it is rampant where I am....and frustrating.

    I don't think it's outside the realm of possibility for people of faith who don't believe in abortion to build a place where pre- and postnatal services are provided, health and parenting classes are taught, AND where people who need birth control for whatever reason get information and access. (There is such a place in Haiti that gets my support. Different place, sometimes different needs, but not as different as might be imagined.)
    wooh, aknottedyarn, and herring_RN like this.
  6. 1
    When I went to college, the RAs would bring a bowl of condoms mixed with candy around the dorm and invite you to take condoms, candy or both. I thought it was a great idea for a college to do. I wasn't sexually active at the time but I appreciated for those that were.

    I also remember not too long ago going to New York and stores would have bowls of condoms. I took one for a souvenior of sorts. My husband and I don't use condoms normally but I thought it was a cool concept. I'd totally support an organization that gave away condoms.

    I do agree though that proper education on condom use needs to be given though. Some people may think they are safe from STDs/pregnancy just because they use a condom. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem like this education is given in schools and parents may not talk about it until it is too late, if at all.
    herring_RN likes this.
  7. 0
    In her resignation letter, Handel, who joined Komen in January 2011, said that “the controversy related to Planned Parenthood has long been a concern to the organization,” and that the de-funding decision was not based on “anyone’s political beliefs or ideology. Rather, both were based on Komen’s mission and how to better serve women, as well as a realization of the need to distance Komen from controversy.”
    Komen vice president Karen Handel resigns - The Washington Post
  8. 1
    Charts: This Is What Happens When You Defund Planned Parenthood | Mother Jones

    The Planned Parenthood clinics that anti-choice legislators booted from the state's Women's Health Program serviced nearly 50 percent of the program's patients. Along with contraceptive counseling, the clinics provided basic screenings for cancer, hypertension, and other key problems. There's no shortage of need: women in Texas suffer high rates of STIs and unintended pregnancies compared to national figures, and the state ranks 50th for diabetes prevalence in women. Nonetheless, Republican lawmakers went after the clinics in 2011, thanks to their long-standing beef with the organization, and forfeited tens of millions in Medicaid reimbursements to the Women's Health Program so they could defund Planned Parenthood clinics without breaking any federal rules governing how states have to spend Medicaid money.

    A majority of this money effected non- Planned Parenthood places. None of the programs involved did abortions. Planned Parenthood works and the Texas experiment shows how well it does and how much it costs the state to deny.


    [COLOR=#000000] [/COLOR]
    wooh likes this.
  9. 1
    But if Texas Republicans can punish just one woman with an unwanted baby, they can be proud of their work being done well!
    tewdles likes this.
  10. 1
    Quote from wooh
    But if Texas Republicans can punish just one woman with an unwanted baby, they can be proud of their work being done well!
    And apparently their moral conscience allows them to sacrifice the health of many women to fight some ideological objection to the federal law allowing access to abortion. That makes them seem pretty narrow minded to me. Apparently compassionate conservatism is dead.
    wooh likes this.


Top