Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait, or learned behavior? - page 3

Hello Allnurses! A question I have been pondering for a very long time now is in regard to the topic of Snowflakism: Is this a genetic trait (and if so, does snowflakism seem to be a dominant or... Read More

  1. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Would I be a snowflake if I groused about going $67,000-plus into debt for an education, only to end up delivering pizza? I recently read of someone to whom this happened, and it seems to be fairly widespread in some much-sought-out career paths.
    Fortunately "back in my day" education was not as prohibitively pricey, and I feel I got my money's worth, got to do work I enjoyed, and wasn't mired in debt for years after I graduated.

    In my mother's day, a snowflake might have been referred to as a "fuss-budget".
  2. by   Tweety
  3. by   GrumpyRN
    Sorry, I could only watch 1:30 minutes of this nonsense. Glad she is your clown, seriously doubt she would be given air time in the UK. Stupid, childish and badly presented.
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from GrumpyRN
    Sorry, I could only watch 1:30 minutes of this nonsense. Glad she is your clown, seriously doubt she would be given air time in the UK. Stupid, childish and badly presented.
    Yep...this is why we can't have any serious conversations and meet in the middle because we have such low opinions of each other.

    I will say that I believe the origin of "snowflake" in modern use was invented in the UK during the Brexit times, the pro-Brexit folks were calling the anti-Brexit people "snowflakes" and it jumped across the pond. Not that is the original use, but it's widespread use started i the UK.

    ‘Poor little snowflake’ – the defining insult of 216 | Politics | The Guardian
  5. by   Tweety
    With those negative connotations this is why I won't get into a discussion whether patients are "snowflakes" and why. I will say that I have noticed over the years as we've gone from patient centered care to "for profit customer service care" there are some people, mostly my generation of boomers that do have a sense of entitlement and can't handle any discomfort or pain, inconvenience and are terribly impatient. But I can't generalize them with a broad term like that that I find insulting.
  6. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from Tweety
    I will say that I believe the origin of "snowflake" in modern use was invented in the UK during the Brexit times, the pro-Brexit folks were calling the anti-Brexit people "snowflakes" and it jumped across the pond. Not that is the original use, but it's widespread use started i the UK.
    I don't remember it being around during the brexit referendum but that does not mean it wasn't. I live in Scotland and brexit was much more polarised in England. The first I remember hearing it was from America.
    Also, of course, the reference in Fight Club.

    Wikipedia states "The term "Generation Snowflake", or its variant "Snowflake Generation", probably originated in the United States and came into wider use in the United Kingdom in 2016 following the publication of Claire Fox's book I Find That Offensive!."

    I would say that amongst my contemporaries the use of "snowflake" would mean someone soft and/or precious. You would call an adult male that to mean he was behaving like a little girl. But then we are unreconstructed politically incorrect dinosaurs.
  7. by   GrumpyRN
    Tweety, I see the same things here. Even though we are free at the point of use, patients have a huge sense of entitlement.

    Was once told by a 19 year old, "I pay your wages." He was unemployed and got benefits from the state. I pointed out with great glee that in fact "I pay your wages."

    I have said to patients in the past, "I am your nurse, not your waiter."

    As well I have retired now. I was really starting to live up to my name.
    Last edit by GrumpyRN on Apr 4 : Reason: Grammer
  8. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    "precious" is a good word. And I still think "fussbudget" is quite apt.
  9. by   Tweety
    Yes, "Generation Snowflake" was invented by boomers talking about their own children in that they grew up so "sensitive".

    I do think it being hurled out as an insult did probably simultaneously occur in both the UK and USA. Interesting that one first heard of it from the US and I first heard of it from the UK. LOL

    Regardless it is widely used as an insult primarily by conservatives against liberals. That's OK, I don't mind being snowflake if it means fairness, decency and equality.
  10. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Jeez, I always thought it just meant that a person was expecting special treatment as a matter of course. Like, the generation who all won first place and nobody lost ... that's what they absorbed in childhood, EVERYONE is special, and THEY are the specialestess of all. It's like the diametric opposite of those raised in the Great Depression, life is a struggle and you have to be vigilant and work hard and don't have any expectations, etc.
    I can't see it as a particularly liberal or conservative issue. It's a snarky thing that anybody can use when they are exasperated by the attention they don't care to give, but is, maybe even passive-aggressively, required by another.
  11. by   BrandonLPN
    There's just as much snowflakism on the right. I see an awful lot of people getting somehow personally offended by the clothing choices of a fictional television character (Roseanne's grandson on her new show). The habit of conservatives to get all in a tiz over who's wearing what or who's marrying who, when it has absolutely nothing to do with them is *very* snowflake-y
  12. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    From the snowflake it comes as a maybe unspoken whine: "it isn't fair...! "

    It's an "I" thing, not a "you" or "they" thing.

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