RNs protest Gov. Snyder’s “Right to Work” corporate takeover - page 7

by herring_RN 5,328 Views | 110 Comments Guide

With their mouths taped shut, RNs protest Gov. Snyder’s “Right to Work” corporate takeover Michigan Nurses Association protests on the Capitol steps in Lansing against Michigan Right To Work legislation Monday, Dec. 10, 2012.... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from VICEDRN
    Actually, you make my point perfectly. It was a mistake for the President to involve himself in the Cambridge issue. It was misstep by a President with admittedly very little political experience (something that is both good and bad) and who was facing some very real pressure to respond to an incident that was racially charged as our country's first president of color. It was a difficult position and I think, from what I have read, he recognized his misstep.

    And yes, Presidents are also people. I recall Richard Nixon commenting on the guilt of Charles Manson. Obviously inappropriate but like every other American, he watched the trials. A presidency is colored by the man in office who yes, has opinions like the rest of us. Every president has his off color comment history.

    Your example is exactly why the President shouldn't involve himself. What if it turns out hot dog guy was sitting there heckling the protesters? What if he threw food at them and we find all that out in a few days? Then its just a bunch of guys behaving badly on both sides.

    Also, the fact that you cling to the apology issue proves my point about conservatives. You want justice EVERYWHERE even when its not the appropriate forum. The White House is the center of the executive branch. Hot dog guy will get his justice from the courthouses.
    So, heckling and throwing food makes it ok for the other side to respond with violence? That sounds a bit like a woman who wears a low-cut top and high heels and goes to a bar with rowdy drunk men shouldn't cry rape . . .

    My dad was a died-in-the-wool union man, ironworker and Democrat. He became very disillusioned with the ways unions were working today. My step-dad was a truck driver in So. Cal and a member of the Teamsters - I'm not a neophyte when it comes to some thuggish behavior by union members.

    It looks pretty obvious to me that there is thuggish behavior going on - but if the prez wants to wait a bit before talking, I'm ok with that. As long as when it becomes obvious that this was thuggish behavior, he condemns it.

    And how am I clinging to the apology issue? I don't want him to apologize. I said that.
  2. 1
    California ratio law written by and lobbied for by tens of thousands of organized nurses save lives.

    http://www.nursing.upenn.edu/chopr/D...fingRatios.pdf
    tewdles likes this.
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    Actually, I am condemning both behaviors if they are present here. I am just saying it is not so simple that the president can just watch Fox News, believe every word of some guys story and apologize. We can't judge either especially not by something on Fox News website!And yes, you want the president to "talk" about it but its obvious you would expect some kind of condemnation. Again, it's really not the presidents job to respond to every incident in every community. Your history colors your opinion.
    herring_RN and aknottedyarn like this.
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    Ok, so there was some violence at a protest rally.... so that just discredits unions or something? Can we stick to the real issues here?

    Making Michigan (my state) a "right to work" state is just opening the door to low wages and a lower standard of living. Do you know what the current "right to work" states have in common? THEY ARE AMONG THE POOREST IN THE NATION.

    Of course companies are attracted.... because they can pay wages slightly higher than developing countries. The southern states have embraced anti-unionism, and is it a coincidence they have the lowest wages, lowest literacy, lowest life expectancy,
    worst benefits all in exchange for what?..... Jobs that pay sucky wages with sucky benefits?

    Where I work now (a government unionized facility) the LPNs make up to 27 dollars an hr. Our CNAs make up to 20. And our cost of living is comparable to the south. How many of you in "right to work" states can compete with that?

    Or should we just embrace our slide
    into the third world as long as it "attracts business"? You know what other country's policies attract manufacturing jobs? Mexico.
    Last edit by BrandonLPN on Dec 13, '12
    tewdles and aknottedyarn like this.
  5. 2
    McDonald's $8.25 Man and $8.75 Million CEO Shows Pay Gap - Yahoo! Finance
    On a chilly November morning, Johnson interrupted his routine. He left his north side apartment and made his way to St. James Cathedral, just off Michigan Avenue, the so-called Magnificent Mile and heart of Chicago's high-end shopping district. There he gathered with other low-wage employees from Macy's Inc. (M), Eddie Bauer, Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. (CMG) and Victoria's Secret.
    He'd heard about an effort to form the Workers Organizing Committee of Chicago, a group pushing for a $15-an-hour wage. Johnson joined despite McDonald's previous efforts to prevent unions, which have left workers with lingering fears. The Big Mac seller has employed a group of experienced managers and executives to parachute into locations where union activity is suspected. In 1998, after workers at a McDonald's in Ohio went on strike to protest unfair wages and working conditions, the leaders lost their jobs, said Sonny Nardi, president of Local 416 Teamsters union in Cleveland.

    Strikers Fired
    "They took a stance," Nardi said. And "the boys did get fired that started it."
    Johnson doesn't talk about the union at work because certain co-workers would tell his manager, he said, and he's afraid he would be reprimanded or even fired. Off the job, though, he's comfortable discussing it. "I'm trying to fight for what I believe in," he said.
    Asked about McDonald's history with organizing, Becca Hary, a company spokeswoman, said in an e-mail that "We don't have a corporate policy" on whether store workers are allowed to form unions.


    Interesting article.
    herring_RN and tewdles like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Where I work now (a government unionized facility) the LPNs make up to 27 dollars an hr. Our CNAs make up to 20. And our cost of living is comparable to the south. How many of you in "right to work" states can compete with that? .

    I see that as part of the problem. In practically every thread on AN regarding where nurses seek information on possible employment, those who live in a particular area will highlight that the cost of living and the wages are tied together.

    So, just curious, if you live in an area where the cost of living is comparable to the south, why do you not get paid accordingly? What makes you worth more in dollars in an area where nothing else is worth more than what the cost of living there dictates?

    Simple answer, of course. The government has made it so. I find this a misuse of government funds, frankly. Now if you lived in an area where the COL is higher, I can see it. And in all my nursing union contract negotiations over the past 30 years, never once were we allowed to use wages levels of any hospitals other than those in our immediate area as comparables. Actually, never once did we even attempt to do so. We would have been laughed out of the room. But your government union not only did it but got away with it. As a taxpayer, I object to that.
    HM-8404 likes this.
  7. 0
    Well, I'm a taxpayer, too.

    And of course our union fought hard to get us the highest wages possible..... that's what unions do. It's called collective bargaining.

    With that said, I suppose I should backtrack a little here and admit that our cost of living IS probably a bit higher than the South. As a Midwest state we're well below the east and west coast's COL, yet where I work we make wages comparable to nurses in big cities on the coast, that's what our union achieved for us.
  8. 1
    And maybe this sounds cold, but if one is smart/savvy enough to get a plumb government job, than I say one deserves the pay and benefits that come with it. I had my sights set on this job early on in nursing school, and I worked methodically toward snagging it. I'm not going to give up my position without a fight. If I wanted a crappy job with crappy wages and crappy benefits, well, I would have taken a job at one of those crappy cooperate nursing homes.
    herring_RN likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Well, I'm a taxpayer, too.

    And of course our union fought hard to get us the highest wages possible..... that's what unions do. It's called collective bargaining.

    With that said, I suppose I should backtrack a little here and admit that our cost of living IS probably a bit higher than the South. As a Midwest state we're well below the east and west coast's COL, yet where I work we make wages comparable to nurses in big cities on the coast, that's what our union achieved for us.
    That makes it a little more acceptable in my view.

    Again, looking back on my years on our negotiating team, do you know what your union used as comparables during contract talks? Certainly they didn't use any local facilities from the sound of it. Sounds to me like the administration just caved because it was the government.

    And do the local, non government facilities try to use your wages as comps during their talks? This is very interesting to me, having the experience I have in two different states, with three different unions for 30 years of negotiating team experience.
  10. 0
    Quote from tntrn
    That makes it a little more acceptable in my view.Again, looking back on my years on our negotiating team, do you know what your union used as comparables during contract talks? Certainly they didn't use any local facilities from the sound of it. Sounds to me like the
    administration just caved because it was the government.And do the local, non government facilities try to use your wages as comps during their talks? This is very interesting to me, having the experience I
    have in two different states, with three different unionsfor 30 years of negotiating team experience.
    To be honest, I have no idea. They must have bypassed regional comparisons
    entirely, because our pay rates are quite higher. Especially for our CNAs. Our pay range for them starts at 14.70 an hour. Most CNAs regionally start at 9.00 an hr.


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