Ohio passes anti-abortion laws without debate or discussion.

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    (Reuters) - Ohio's governor signed a two-year, $62 billion state budget on Sunday that seeks to spur economic growth with a reduction in personal income taxes and includes a provision that critics say will tighten restrictions on abortions in the state.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...1?feedType=RSS

    This was passed without the normal debate or discussion.
    How it got there is not the biggest scandal...that the governor signed it without vetoing that language IS!

    I feel bad for my family and friends living in that state. Which Republican state is next? Michigan, Wisconsin?
    StNeotser likes this.
  2. 250 Comments so far...

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    176 views and no comments yet? Wow! I wonder why people feel afraid to talk about the topic?
    Last edit by StNeotser on Jul 2, '13
    tewdles likes this.
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    Sad. The party of small government passing a law requiring an ultrasound?
    I would hope they would mandate prenatal care with ultrasound instead.

    I'm pro life, but this is just going to send people who can afford it to go to another state.
    aknottedyarn and tewdles like this.
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    I believe they also defined a fertilized egg as "life" in the language, meaning that anything that prevents implantation falls into the category that could trigger the ultrasound requirement and may even meet their definition of abortion.

    Abortion may not be mentioned as an option during rape counseling or the clinic loses any state funding it receives.

    Health Professionals are required to verbally provide scripted information to patients considering abortion that many do not agree with.

    I wonder how many of the state's women, and the men who love them, would have approved of this law had anyone been given opportunity to discuss it. It is a done deal now.

    LAW.

    ALL OF THE "BACKWARD THINKING",
    INVASIVE,
    REPRESSIVE,
    BIG GOVERNMENT LANGUAGE IS now LAW...passed by a few white men for the betterment of society.
    Last edit by tewdles on Jul 2, '13
    CrufflerJJ, Elvish, and aknottedyarn like this.
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    Quote from StNeotser
    176 views and no comments yet? Wow! I wonder why people feel afraid to talk about the topic?
    I doubt anyone is afraid to talk about the topic....more like what's the use? Anyone who might agree with the Governor and Legislature risks getting soundly scolded. Why put oneself in that position?
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    Quote from tntrn
    I doubt anyone is afraid to talk about the topic....more like what's the use? Anyone who might agree with the Governor and Legislature risks getting soundly scolded. Why put oneself in that position?
    Some do think "whats the use"...after all, this VERY controversial topic just got legislated...under the radar of the Ohio citizens. THOSE voters/women have the right to wonder WTH? They are the ones getting soundly scolded by the legislation of the white christian males who know what is best for them.

    If you support the notion of that Governor, perhaps you could share some missed logic in his action/inaction. While I might not agree, I would appreciate SOME insight into what they might be thinking.
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    Quote from tewdles
    Some do think "whats the use"...after all, this VERY controversial topic just got legislated...under the radar of the Ohio citizens. THOSE voters/women have the right to wonder WTH? They are the ones getting soundly scolded by the legislation of the white christian males who know what is best for them.

    If you support the notion of that Governor, perhaps you could share some missed logic in his action/inaction. While I might not agree, I would appreciate SOME insight into what they might be thinking.
    I don't know any more about it than hat has been presented here and therefore I don't feel that is enough information to make any kind of judgment.

    I was responding to the question why more people were not participating in the discussion.
    tewdles likes this.
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    Quote from StNeotser
    176 views and no comments yet? Wow! I wonder why people feel afraid to talk about the topic?
    Because it has been done. to. death. It's been proven time and time again that many of us see this issue very, very differently, and that we will NEVER agree on it. Nor will the opposing sides ever change their minds no matter how much yammering goes on.

    I know I won't---abortion is black-and-white in my mind and there are no grey areas to dither over.
    Every living being has rights.......that is, until those rights interfere with someone else's. IOW: Your freedom to swing your fist ends where my nose begins, and your body is your own until another person occupies it. Plain and simple, end of story.

    At least, it is as far as I'm concerned. YMMV, of course.
    imintrouble, azhiker96, FranEMTnurse, and 1 other like this.
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    I have not entered the fray because as Viva says the subject matter is solid in our minds. I agree with Twedles that the real issue is not what was turned into law as much as how it was done. At the legislative level it needed to be discussed openly and have input from the citizens of the state.

    I am firmly against the state mandate about medical procedures. I believe medical decisions are to be made by PCP and patient. Recently SO had to make decision about health care needs. His decision was made based on best medical practice and personal input. There is no law dictating what needs to be done, or when. If there were a law I suspect he would be on the "wrong" side in terms of his decision. Only someone educated to explain real facts and an educated patient need to be included in any medical decision.

    I think we need to look at Ohio, North Carolina, and Texas as examples of legislators gone wild. They are to legislate for the best outcomes of their constituents. The manner and in some cases the decisions themselves, as done by these mostly men, will not be the best for the people they are to serve.

    In Texas we have seen a governor be very inappropriate in the way he responded to a legal maneuver done by one legislator in response to the governor's and legislature's failure to have important issues brought up in a special session. This governor talks about the sanctity of life the same day he has the 500th execution completed. This after allowing almost a non-regulated industrial state to form the backdrop for one of the worst industrial accidents that blew an entire town off the map. Sanctity of life has to include the living. Texas and North Carolina certainly have shown they do not value life once born. Ohio is just the tip of the iceberg of two-faced bold liars.

    Regardless of your position on termination of pregnancies we are educated to provide accurate health info to our patients and clients. In the case of these three states and perhaps others, nurses will not be able to give evidence based facts to patients who need and want this education. Instead we see non-medically educated legislators providing false info. The latest crazy one being that a rape kit removes the chance of pregnancy.

    These legislators are not using evidence based facts. That needs to be addressed.
    herring_RN, StNeotser, and Elvish like this.
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    HOW IS THIS PRO LIFE?
    ... The provision ...
    ... blocks public hospitals from arranging transfer agreements with abortion clinics ...
    Ohio governor signs budget including tax cut, anti-abortion provision | Reuters
    Why is the government putting restrictions on hospitals in a budget bill? They didn't outlaw abortions or provide an alternative to abortion. They did make it more dofficult to save the life of the woman if something were to go wrong.

    Earlier this year I had toe surgery. I made sure the surgery center had a transfer agreement so if I were to have a reaction to anestheticthere would be no delay at the hospital.

    Yes, it was a budget bill: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...95519E20130606
    tewdles and aknottedyarn like this.


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